Hadogenes troglodytes

dennis

Arachnodemon
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Jan 2, 2003
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Hi all,

I am planning on expanding my arachnid collection a little, and I want to buy some scorps. I already did some research, and asked some ppl here about what would be a good beginner species. Pandinus imperator and Hadogenes troglodytes came out as good beginners. But here's what's up.

I have a large enclosure, well, not really large, but kinda, larger than normal. It's 12x20x12 inch. And I like to put in a small group of scorpions. I read that Pandinus imperator can go quite well in a group, but I havent read anything about the Hadogenes troglodytes doing well in a group...

Furthermore I think that the Hadogenes troglodytes is somewhat easier to take care of than the Pandinus imperator, because the Hadogenes troglodytes doesn't need that high humidity...

Anyway, I hope you guys can help me out.


Dennis
 

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
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Originally posted by dennie
I havent read anything about the Hadogenes troglodytes doing well in a group...
That is because they tend not to. In fact, I've heard reports that they are among the worst for canabalism. Don't know if I quite believe it -- but I only have the one, so can't really say.

Cheers,
Dave
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
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Jan 6, 2003
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Hadogenes are horrible with cannibalism. My female tried to eat my male while they were breeding!!! Only time I had ever heard of scorps doing that, though I know praying mantids do. She also attempted to eat her young as they were coming off her back on the second breeding. I had to stuff her so full of crickets and grasshoppers to prevent it. I'd rather not have to do so again because I lost one scorplet from that group, but she'll be having more soon, so we'll see what I can come up with this time to keep all of them.


adios,
edw. :?
 

dennis

Arachnodemon
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770
Thanks guys. I'm sure I won't put that one with more then one in one enclosure. Then I'm thinking about maybe a small group of emperors... But I read they live to burrow and to not-showing their selves. I also read Pandinus imperator gets pretty big, so will 12x20x12" be big enough to hold 2 or even 3?

Dennis
 

Kugellager

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If you can get Centruroides vittatus in Holland they make excellent communal species, are visible at many times of the day, and you would be able to keep quite a few in the enclosure you describe.

They are also not very nearly as mosture sensative as emps. The sting is reported to be quite painful but is not deadly by any means. This species also readily breeds in captivity which would allow for a self sustaining colony. They are also quite small (3-6cm)

John
];')
 

Botar

Arachnoprince
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Aug 27, 2002
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As opposed to starting a new thread, I thought I'd just post this here. This picture was taken at the ATS conference in June 2003. It is a Hadogenes troglodytes and, needless to say, it really sparked my interest in the species. I have 4 coming on Tuesday.

Suggestions on set up from the gurus of scorpion husbandry would be appreciated. I'm already set on the individual enclosure thing, I just need to know the basics... peat vs. sand. Humidity on the Emperor side or a bit drier. Also, would housing be the same for the East African Flatrock (Hadogenes sp.)? I've seen the species name of the East African before, but I cannot remember it right now.

Anyway, thanks for the help.

Botar
 

Diao

Arachnoknight
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Jun 22, 2003
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Hadogenes live in a drier area than the Pandinus. Low humidity (50-60%) will do just fine. A buddy of mine keeps his on some of this shredded coconut, which is more or less a sand-like substrate. There are several pieces of supported slate in there, and the scorpion will gladly take hide in there. An interesting species, very habitual. It takes it's even strolls when the lights go out, and it eats like a PIG. Good luck!
 

skinheaddave

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H.paucidens is probably the name you've seen.

What Diao described sounds pretty darn good. Since flatrocks don't really burrow, substrate is of little importance. We use sand, others use dirt or peat etc. It can be kept dry. The key is to provide some flat rocks for the flatrock. Use stacks of slate done in such a way that there are places for it to hide. Be sure to use silicone or whatnot to keep them in place so you don't have a collapse. Add a waterdish to the setup, and you're set. Temps should be moderate for a scorp (85 or so) and humidity should come in the form of misting on occasion (maybe once a month). Keep the water dish full, provide a few crickets and that's all there is to it.

I will warn you, though, that while all are harmless, some flatrocks can be pissy. Thus, if you are going for a handleable scorpion, it is a good idea to check out the candidates from the outset. Also, careful planning is needed if you want to be able to see your charge. But then, you know me and my policy on seeing scorps. :)

Cheers,
Dave
 

neveragain

Arachnobaron
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Jan 15, 2003
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For substrate, I use a mixture of playsand, gravel, and broken up pieces of slate. I keep the temps at around 80 degrees, and keep the waterdish full at all times. Its in a 5 gallon tank with stacked slate for a hide (as everyone else has mentioned you should do)

Here is a picture of it.
 

Attachments

P070

Arachnopeon
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Even though this is an old thread Im curious to how having your H.paucidens in the same enclosure turned out?
 
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