Get it to be smaller?

El Pistolero GL

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
23
I bought an emp and he's pretty chubby, can I make it thinner/smaller by feeding it less? I know the answer is probably yes but will it affect its length? I want it a little smaller
 

Vfox

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
530
Depends on the size of it. If it's still a juvenile then it may be preparing for a molt...and honestly small emps are pretty chubby looking anyway. If it's an adult then I would ask how often, what food, and how much do you feed it?
 

El Pistolero GL

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
23
I usually feed it once a week but I was thinking of bringing that down to once every two weeks for a little while
 

Vfox

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Sep 1, 2007
Messages
530
Do you feed it crickets? How many? And how big is it?
 

ArachnoYak

Arachnoknight
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Jul 12, 2007
Messages
224
Why would you want it smaller? You want to restrict it's growth so it's more aesthetically appealing to you? Owner-induced anorexia on any animal couldn't be a good thing.
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
Why would you want it smaller? You want to restrict it's growth so it's more aesthetically appealing to you? Owner-induced anorexia on any animal couldn't be a good thing.
When we're speaking of captive animals, "anorexia" is probably the last thing we need to worry about. Our animals tend to be overweight or flat-out obese. Better to feed a bit less and maintain more natural proportions in my opinion.

I don't know if we're talking about a juvenile here though. In that case, it doesn't really matter. Feed more to get it big quick, feed less for a longer lifespan, whatever you want as long as it isn't being neglected.
 

Canth

Arachnolord
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Dec 16, 2005
Messages
655
When we're speaking of captive animals, "anorexia" is probably the last thing we need to worry about. Our animals tend to be overweight or flat-out obese. Better to feed a bit less and maintain more natural proportions in my opinion.
I agree with this 100%. It's amazing how much people overfeed when comparing animals found in the wild. I like the lean, healthy look much better than the overstuffed, almost popped look.
 

ArachnoYak

Arachnoknight
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Jul 12, 2007
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224
When we're speaking of captive animals, "anorexia" is probably the last thing we need to worry about. Our animals tend to be overweight or flat-out obese. Better to feed a bit less and maintain more natural proportions in my opinion.
My point was that aesthetics shouldn't be high on the priorities list when keeping animals, their well being is more important. Your opinion is merely your opinion, and we're all entitled to one of those. And if you feel it's okay for you to label an animal as "flat-out obese" then you can see how one could be labeled as "anorexic" as it's the same principle applied.
 

ArachnoYak

Arachnoknight
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I agree with this 100%. It's amazing how much people overfeed when comparing animals found in the wild. I like the lean, healthy look much better than the overstuffed, almost popped look.
Nobody likes that "popped" look, but everyone appreciates a healthy animal, the key is finding that balance without overfeeding.
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
My point was that aesthetics shouldn't be high on the priorities list when keeping animals, their well being is more important. Your opinion is merely your opinion, and we're all entitled to one of those. And if you feel it's okay for you to label an animal as "flat-out obese" then you can see how one could be labeled as "anorexic" as it's the same principle applied.
Aesthetics can be tied into the well-being of an animal, especially with arachnids. We don't know how large OP's scorpion is without seeing a picture, but if he feels it's overweight, it may well be a good idea to cut feeding. It doesn't mean he's restricting growth. You can switch that around and say he would be powerfeeding if he didn't get stop giving it food, which isn't a particularly good idea either.
 

Treynok

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
202
Aesthetics can be tied into the well-being of an animal, especially with arachnids. We don't know how large OP's scorpion is without seeing a picture, but if he feels it's overweight, it may well be a good idea to cut feeding. It doesn't mean he's restricting growth. You can switch that around and say he would be powerfeeding if he didn't get stop giving it food, which isn't a particularly good idea either.
He could also be a more inexperienced keeper and it could be approaching a molt. We just don't know from the little bit of info given. A question like this isn't a simple answer but I don't believe over-feeding is a problem or detriment to the health of the scorpion. Yes they have instincts to eat when food is available but they will refuse food, they won't eat to the point of damaging themselves. We don't even know the instar of mentioned scorpion and that is very important in how fat it should look / how often it should be offered food. I usually offer food once a week to all my mature scorpions, and 2-3 times a week to immature. Some of my scorpions like my communal C. sculpturatus almost always have food available to them but they don't eat to the point of death and really don't "look" over-weight.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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May 22, 2006
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3,479
Something superficial like esthaetics are clearly a human invention. That's the nice thing about all that is non human, it is what it is, or they are what they are: rocks, stars, goats, scorpions, they are there and doing what they are intended to do, no more, no less.

But, scorpions are like humans, some are fat, others are slim, some are docile, others are not.....
 
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