G. Rosea sling kicking at nothing?

Cheo Samad

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 2, 2017
Messages
38
This may seem kind of weird, but my girlfriends very small G. Rosea sling (probably aboit 1/2 inch) seems to be kicking hairs at nothing.

I don't look at it very much (I'm sure it doesnt like a giant beast 10000 times its size looming over it for hours at a time) but I try to check on out animals 2-3 times throughout the day. Ya know, just to make sure they havent up and died out of nowhere.

Anyway, I caught my girlfriends sling kicking hairs at the ground in its deli cup. I'll be honest, the thing is so small and my eyes are so bad I can't really see the abdomen, so I have no real idea if its in premolt. It did refuse food very recently, but it's also a G. Rosea so they have a reputation for doing that.

Any insite would be appreciated.
 

BobBarley

Arachnoprince
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
1,480
Either you made some sort of vibration (walking, talking, bumping the table, etc) while watching it that for some reason scared it, or it is just spreading hairs around the enclosure as a sort of defense. I haven't known rosea's to do the latter, however, I wouldn't be surprised if some do.
 

Cheo Samad

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 2, 2017
Messages
38
Either you made some sort of vibration (walking, talking, bumping the table, etc) while watching it that for some reason scared it, or it is just spreading hairs around the enclosure as a sort of defense. I haven't known rosea's to do the latter, however, I wouldn't be surprised if some do.
Most likely the former. It may have heard/felt me enter the room and probably scared it a bit.
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 8, 2013
Messages
434
It might be premolt.. I notice the higher frequency of hair kicking when the molt is near... And then when they are making molting mats they usually kick around some hairs as a sort of a "barbed wire" :p to make themselves protected while they are flipped :p
 

Cheo Samad

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 2, 2017
Messages
38
It might be premolt.. I notice the higher frequency of hair kicking when the molt is near... And then when they are making molting mats they usually kick around some hairs as a sort of a "barbed wire" :p to make themselves protected while they are flipped :p
That was the reason I thought possible premolt, on top of the refused food (even though like I said, it's a G. rosea, so the planets not being alligned is a reason to not eat)

I havent seen any other premolt behavior, such as laying a web bed, or a 'noticable' dark abdomen, but my eyesight is terrible and I try to leave the Ts alone, so these are behaviors I could easily miss. All in all, time will tell.
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
Even though a different species, my B.smithi starts kicking a few weeks before she has a dark abdomen for molting.
Grammostola sp develop a less obvious darker abdomen so it doesn't have to be your eyesight;)

Laughed at the comment about the planets not being aligned :rofl:
 
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