First Timer!!

s6ola

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
0
Hi, I am looking to get my first Tarantula and wanted some advice about what one would be suitable? I have been advised on the Chillian Rose?

What is the best Tarantular that i will be able handle without hurting/being bitten etc (i would like to get use to handling them).

Thanks for your help!!!

Tom.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Hi, I am looking to get my first Tarantula and wanted some advice about what one would be suitable? I have been advised on the Chillian Rose?

What is the best Tarantular that i will be able handle without hurting/being bitten etc (i would like to get use to handling them).

Thanks for your help!!!

Tom.
Each and every tarantula will have its own personality that can/ will change from molt to molt, so no matter what you get; you risk hurting it/ being bitten when you handle. There are species that are typically more docile and better beginner tarantulas.

I would recommend an A. avicularia(pinktoe) which is arboreal and G. rosea(chillean rose) which is terrestrial. Like I said already though, it is not a guarantee of a docile T to choose one of these species.

If you do end up handling your future T, always keep it low to the ground while doing so. A fall can lead to a dead T.

And Welcome to the boards! :D There is a link to a fantastic sticky in my signature and take the time to wine and dine the advanced search engine, because it can be your best friend when looking for information! ;) If you search only in the tarantula chat and Questions & Discussions you will find more relevant threads. Once again, welcome to the boards! :D
 
Last edited:

Arachnos482

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
50
Wow, where to start, welcome to AB, what specifically are you looking for in a t? Size? Colour? I'd say a G. pulchra is a good starter t, E.campestratus is also a good choice, check them out.
 

s6ola

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
0
Thanks for your help!!!

I have looked at the different T's...the brazilian black looks like a real monster!! Im really liking the pinktoe, i have watched videos of them jumping from hands - after time that would be something i'd like mine to try.

How often can you pet a T (i know it probably depends on its personality), also, is it safe to let them roam free on the floor (obviously under constant supervision).
 

Arachnos482

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
50
To be honest, you must understand that no t finds pleasure in being handled, some species are just more tolerant to being handled than others, and you don't want a t jumping from your hands, they can injure themselves quite severely. And yes, every t is different, you'll learn that as you progress in the hobby, i'd advise that you buy Stan Shultz's tarantula keepers guide, all the info you want is in there, it's the t keepers bible, hope this helps.
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
I will let the others touch up on the subjects of handling and petting and the like.

I can highly recommend G. pulchripes (The Chaco Golden knee) They get large, have a nice coloration, are extremely docile, and quite hardy.

I personally wouldn't recommend G. rosea because they can be quite moody and psycho and dramatically change in behavior. I do love mine though and it is a staple for any collection.

Coming in second to G. pulchripes, is B. albopilosum (Curly hair). They are little bulldozers, constantly moving dirt around and always active, they don't kick hairs as much as other Brachypelma species, and from my experience are also really docile.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Thanks for your help!!!

I have looked at the different T's...the brazilian black looks like a real monster!! Im really liking the pinktoe, i have watched videos of them jumping from hands - after time that would be something i'd like mine to try.
I am glad I have not seen those videos. It is neat to see them jump, but it is also heart stopping/ scary. Tarantulas are basically blind and only able to see the difference between light and dark, so it is not something to encourage in my opinion. Once again, falling can rupture the Ts abdomen/ kill it. Tarantulas don't perform tricks.

How often can you pet a T (i know it probably depends on its personality)
You can not 'pet' a T. A T is not a mammal/ reptile and 'petting' it will probably result in itchy hands and maybe a little nibble to go with it. As far as handling, it is a heated debate here on the forum. Some say that you should never handle, some say every once in awhile is okay and some say as much as every day. The tarantula does not benefit from it in any way either. Doing a search on "handling" will yield you many opinions on the subject. Personally, we don't handle much at all. If when feeding, or rehousing they crawl around on our hands for a few minutes; we don't complain.


also, is it safe to let them roam free on the floor (obviously under constant supervision).
Tarantulas can be fast, even the bigger ones can put on big bursts of speed unexpectedly. If you have a room that you feel confident that it cannot get in anything/ under anything/ out of, or be stepped on, then it is at your own discretion.

I highly recommend that you pick up a copy of the Tarantula Keeper's Guide. It is geared at beginners/ people considering the hobby, just like yourself. If you don't have the money to buy it, then request it at the library and give it a read.
 
Last edited:

s6ola

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
0
I really APPRECIATE all the help, and i will certainly be getting the book for beginners.

I have just been told to get a Mexican Redknee, although these look slighlty dangerous, are they?
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
How do they look dangerous? They are no more dangerous than any of the others you have been recommended. They are also a good starter, but they frequently kick hairs. They will also cost you a little bit more depending on the size you get.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
I really APPRECIATE all the help, and i will certainly be getting the book for beginners.

I have just been told to get a Mexican Redknee, although these look slighlty dangerous, are they?
Brachypelma smithi(I recommend learning the scientific names;) ) are N(ew)W(orld) tarantulas, which means that they have urticating on their abdomen that they are able to kick off at will. Having the option to kick hairs first, usually makes them less prone to biting as a first defense; unlike O(ld)W(orld) tarantulas. There are 5 different types of urticating hairs and B. smithi is lucky to have all of them. This could mean that you have a greater chance at being allergic and having a more severe reaction to being in contact with the hairs, or like me, it could make no difference. It is definitely something to consider though.

I am unsure what looks 'more dangerous' about them.:? They are NW, so their venom doesn't pack quite the wallop of an OW. However, tarantula venom is not fatal to humans. It can be very uncomfortable depending on the species, but not deadly. (I have not been bitten, but have read plenty of bite reports to know that)

When you are picturing this tarantula that you want to get, is it itty bitty, or large? If you are picturing a large one, many of the species listed here in this thread will be a tad pricey to obtain. The 2 that I recommended are generally not. This may not make a difference to you, but once again is something to consider.
 

Scoolman

Arachnolord
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
613
Thanks for your help!!!

I have looked at the different T's...the brazilian black looks like a real monster!! Im really liking the pinktoe, i have watched videos of them jumping from hands - after time that would be something i'd like mine to try.

How often can you pet a T (i know it probably depends on its personality), also, is it safe to let them roam free on the floor (obviously under constant supervision).
G pulchra (Brazilian Black) is a beautiful tarantula. They do get large, I have one at 7" now. They are usually quite calm, and out in view.
Tarantulas do not "enjoy" interactions with any creatures, let alone a giant predator like a human. Some species will tolerate being manipulated. They are hermits, spending most of their lives in a single burrow.
As for B smithii (mexican red knee) looking dangerous, that is a normal reaction to the conditioning mother nature has instilled in the animal kingdom: red colors indicate danger. However, in this case it is just a rouse. The smithii is a great first T, they do have a tendency to kick urticating bristles, though.
Make sure you do your homework before you get a tarantula. Joining a forum is a good start, and your questions are very valid. Do not allow the nay sayers to sway you. If you do not ask, you will never learn. Welcome to the hobby.
Here is a shot of one of my G pulchras, Ebony
 

s6ola

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
0
Thank you for your advice curiousme and scoolman (and everyone else).

I am going to my local reptile shop tonight where they have a baby Brachypelma smithi ;) for sale (i will probably be putting a deposit on the T). I think i would like to get this T rather than an adult as i can see its growth and take the oppourtunity to learn about it as it grows to an adult.

Is there anything i should be careful of as its so young? Any advice to keeping it healthy and enjoying life?

Many thanks!!!!!!!
 

Sodaboy1978

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 25, 2010
Messages
8
Hi I am a newbie myself. I can tell you that I have a mild phobia of spiders, And that my best experience with handling a T is with my Pink Toe, all though it is fast and jumpy. My wife Seezilla is looking for a Pink Zebra Beauty, cause they are supposed to be the most docile T. We have a Rosie but its moody.
 

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
My G. rosea is a moody one too so i really don't reccomend it to beginners. Its a pet rock that bites.


+1 for G. pulchra mine is quite small 3" and really really docile. its Jet black already and my favorite of the 5 I have.

I second the motion to learn the scientific names because it makes it a heck of a lot clearer when the more experienced to girzzled ancients jump in to the conversations to help; as generic names change from region to region.

Additionally here are some terms to know (some one correct me if i'm wrong)

CB= captive bread
WC= wild caught
OW= old world (means its from asia)
NW = new world (north america / south america
T = tarantula
sling = spiderling
substrate = the soil/dirt in the bottom of the cage.
and a tonne more you'll pick up over your time on the forum

(I list these because i didnt know them when i started)
 

brian abrams

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
75
Safe T

Another vote for B Smithi, especially if you want to handle! Sure, pink-toes are innocuos, but they are fast and skittish! I have yet to have ever gotten a threat pose from my 40+ B Smithi!
 

madTparty

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 5, 2010
Messages
22
+1 for Grammostole pulchripes, or Chaco Golden Knee. They're gorgeous! And very sweet IMHO!:)
 

Salamanderhead

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
410
Most people point in the direction of a terrestrial (living on the ground) species.
I usually recommend an Avicularia. Avicularia though. Just not as a sling. If you can get your hands on a larger specimen do it. They're very nice looking and docile. They make fairly interesting webs and since they're arboreal (living high up in trees) you can make cool looking jungle theme enclosures.
Well I suppose you could for a terrestrial as well but you know... :cool:
 
Top