first molt

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
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Feb 13, 2011
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10
Hi, we have a sub adult Chilean Rose which we have had for 6 months. A couple of days ago she started acting differently, wouldn't eat, and stamping down on the earth in her tank. Yesterday at around 11.00 am she flipped over so we realised she was going to molt. This will be the first molt we have experienced.Its now 30 hrs later. During this time she has been alterating between wriggling and resting. The thing I am worried about is that her heat pad had broken sometime leading up to this and we only noticed when we noticed her flip onto her back. We went and got a new one and brought the tank upto humidity, but during the night we lost electricity and therefore the humidity in the tank. Its back to normal now but I'm really worried that his will have affected the molt. She just doesnt seem to be getting very far. Also I've been reading so many horror stories its worried me sick. Any advice?
 
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Madratter

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 30, 2011
Messages
22
My first T was a B.smithi whose first molt in my care happened during a power outage in winter. We moved her near a kerosene heater we had running for heat which sucked the humidity out of her tank with no ill effects. I don't think a short period of time with out humidity will affect it too much. Hope all goes well with your Ts molt as well.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
10
Thanks for you input, its hard watching her struggling and knowing that theres nothing I can do to help her! Its quite scary to see it for the first time. I'll just have to be patient I guess:wall:
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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Dec 11, 2008
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If the T was well hydrated when it started to molt, that is all the hydration it needs. Upping the humidity during a molt doesn't do anything to actually help the molting process, it is the internal hydration that matters. G. rosea do not need special humidity requirements either, most keep them in a completely dry enclosure with a large water dish. So, the loss of the humidity shouldn't be a problem and being a bit cooler shouldn't either.

However, I do have a couple of questions for you.

When you say it is a sub-adult, what does that equate to in size/ inches/ cm? And how much does the T have free from the old exo?
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
10
her(and i honestly am not sure if it is a she) body measures about 2 1/2 "-3" long by 1 1/2" wide with a span of about 6". ATM cannot see any of the old exo. I read that they normally make a web to moult on and she hasn't done that.It really shows you how vulnerable they'd be in the wild during a moult. It seem to be taking such a long time.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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her(and i honestly am not sure if it is a she) body measures about 2 1/2 "-3" long by 1 1/2" wide with a span of about 6".
At that size, I wouldn't call it sub adult. In fact, I am wondering if what you have is in fact a M(ature)M(ale) that is attempting to molt a final time. Unfortunately, most do not make it through that process and those that do, don't live long after. The front 2 legs, not the pedipalps, will have tibial hooks on the back of them and the pedipalps will have bulbs at the ends of them. With G. rosea the hooks are fairly easy to see, so a quick visual check can confirm or deny that for you.

ATM cannot see any of the old exo.
Is there any further change now?

I read that they normally make a web to moult on and she hasn't done that.
Normally, but not always and if it is a MM, then I don't think normalcy applies.

It really shows you how vulnerable they'd be in the wild during a moult. It seem to be taking such a long time.
Not really, it would be down in a burrow or otherwise hidden, not out in the open like they are kept in captivity. :)

I hope your T has made some progress, but since it was at 30 hours already when I last posted, I would think it would have made some at that point. Pictures always help if you are able, but you making a visual check for those hooks on the back of the front 2 legs will help you the fastest. If it has not managed to free itself from its molt by now, then I do not think it is going to though.:(
 

PitViper

Arachnoknight
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Dec 1, 2009
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grammostola sp usually take a long time to molt, especially adults, you also shouldn't use a heat pad.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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grammostola sp usually take a long time to molt, especially adults, you also shouldn't use a heat pad.
Since the OP is in Europe, they do not always keep their homes at the same temps that we do here in the states. The heat mat may be needed, or you may be right and it is superfluous.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
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THIS IS DOING MY HEAD IN!!!! Cant see any hooks on her? front legs at all, still moving, still no change have a couple of pics, will try to upload.
 

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curiousme

Arachnoprince
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THIS IS DOING MY HEAD IN!!!! Cant see any hooks on her? front legs at all, still moving, still no change have a couple of pics, will try to upload.
I would strike the possibility off that it is a male, myself. The abdomen isn't as diminutive as the males tend to be. That isn't a sure fire way to sex a T at all, but in a pinch in this situation I would venture to say it doesn't look like a MM. (feel free to correct me if I am missing something)

If it is still stuck and still moving, then you can research how to help the T out; but I don't know how to go about it when it is still so early on. I don't have the time to search for links for you like I normally would, but try using the advanced search in the Tarantula section, and use "help" "stuck" "molt" as your words to search for. That should hopefully get you some suitable threads to peruse, since this thread seems to be missing the eyes of the more experienced. I wish your T luck.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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Back after some searches and found this thread that states that 24 hours for a large T like yours is not unheard of, so maybe yours is taking it a bit farther. Ours is smaller than yours, so never takes that long.

And here is a thread with directions for helping it remove the old exo. Just do not get the soap on the book lungs if you do that.

The search criteria I gave you above needed to be shortened to "molt" "stuck", so I apologize that my suggestion did not yield any results.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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That substrate is way too wet for G. rosea.

It also doesn't look like a mature male, nor does it look like it's molting. That's not a typical molt position, even though the spider is on its back.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
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10
thought I'd just keep you up to date.Its now 3 days in and shes still on her back, still wriggling around, no exo. have moved her to a warm really quiet spot and am leaving her covered over. just dont know whats going on. some people say humid, some say dry,I really dont know what to do. if there was sign of exo moving i might try the links instruction but as yet theres nothing. poor thing dont know if shes suffering, its horrible, thanks for all your advice guys, will keep you posted.
 

PitViper

Arachnoknight
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201
3 days is way too long for a spider molting, doesn't sound good, the longest I've had a was my MM Rosea took about 15 hours for his mature molt.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
10
dont know what to say, as I said no sign of actual moult just plenty of wriggling. just have to wait and see.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
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Feb 13, 2011
Messages
10
don't believe this now people, if I wasn't confused before I really am now. I moved her to a quiet place etc, left her all mlast night and all tiday in peace in the dark. Could'nt bare it any more had to check. Shes back on her feet looking all fluffy but no sign of a moult. I think shes acting a bit odd as well, she was like it before she flipped over, a bit clumsy. I don't have a clue now. I've put her back in the dark for a while. Should I offer her food? She had two large crickets in the two weeks leading up to this.
 

msaerfen

Arachnopeon
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Feb 13, 2011
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she's still on her back. I'm just stumped now. I guess she knows what shes doing but I sure as s**t dont!
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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she's still on her back. I'm just stumped now. I guess she knows what shes doing but I sure as s**t dont!
How is your T doing now? I am at a loss for advice to give, but I am hoping that it has decided to molt.
 
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