Female Huntsman

Cheshire

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When you abbreviate latin names, the rule is to write the first letter of the genus name, followed by the species name. Generally, you're supposed to italicize it (H. venatoria), as well.

That being said...how much do you feed that lady?
 

Jonathan

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Hey,
What size is she about?
Jon
 
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squamata99

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I do that because sometimes you can have two different species that have the same first name initial and same second name - like H. gigas for example. I abbreviate this way so people can have a better reference to look up the species on the net. or in books. Not every one will know H. stands for heterapoda, or hysterocrates etc. She doesn't eat that much, but she stays plump. She's eaten about 4 small wood roaches 1/4" in the past 2.5 - 3 months.

With T's mostly:

Spider sheds - starts to eat - I feed well initially - then lay off to one nice size meal every 2-3+ weeks.

True spiders fed less than my T's.
 

Cheshire

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I do that because sometimes you can have two different species that have the same first name initial and same second name - like H. gigas for example. I abbreviate this way so people can have a better reference to look up the species on the net. or in books. Not every one will know H. stands for heterapoda, or hysterocrates etc. She doesn't eat that much, but she stays plump. She's eaten about 4 small wood roaches 1/4" in the past 2.5 - 3 months.

With T's mostly:

Spider sheds - starts to eat - I feed well initially - then lay off to one nice size meal every 2-3+ weeks.

True spiders fed less than my T's.
She's huge. You feed her half as much as I feed my spiders. :?

Either way, that's the accepted abbreviation method that everyone else in the biology community uses and I've never seen anyone confused by it.

Most scientific journals require that the full scientific name, including author be spelled out upon first mention of a species, but the name can be abbreviated to the first letter of the genus and the species name in subsequent mention. Also, lists of species from the same genus can be abbreviated by writing the full name of the first species in the list and then abbreviating the rest. For example, the list of snappers from a previous section can be abbreviated to: "...the red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), the mahogany snapper (L.mahogoni), the dog snapper (L. jocu), the schoolmaster (L. apodus)...". Names are always spelled out if abbreviations can lead to confusion of species with similar names. In some cases, particularly in the mosquito literature, the genus name abbreviation consists of two letters, Ae. for Aedes, An. for Anopheles, Cx. for Culex, Cs. for Culiseta, and so on.
.

I'd imagine there's also restrictions in place against naming species similarly within families or orders.
 
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Mr. Mordax

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I'd imagine there's also restrictions in place against naming species similarly within families or orders.
Check the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature for the exact rules. But I can see what squamata means, especially for informal use -- I did a search for "A. gigas" once and turned up lots of stuff having nothing to do with millipedes. And half the inverts I own seem to have gigas or giganteus as the species name. :rolleyes:
 

konrad16660

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a spider is not going to die from overfeeding it with the correct food. some people disagree, but they will stop eating when they don't want too anymore. you'll just get faster growth with more feeding much of the time.
 

squamata99

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What other huntsmans are in the US hobby? Post some pics of what you have.
 

edie

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What other huntsmans are in the US hobby? Post some pics of what you have.
i've seen 2 types of huntsman here in AZ, i'm not sure if they're really in the hobby but i've kept an Olios giganteus that i caught outside for about 5 or 6 months now, and its doing well.
heres a picture of her



and heres a picture of the other huntsman i saw here, i don't have an id on it though

 

Dr. John

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Hello Edie ,

The spider on your second picture could just very well be the male version of the one on your first picture .

Dr. John
 

edie

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Hello Edie ,

The spider on your second picture could just very well be the male version of the one on your first picture .

Dr. John
from what i've read about O. giganteus they're leg span is 3"
the spider in the second picture had at least 5", much larger than any O. giganteus i've ever seen, i have never seen a male before though.
 

edie

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O. giganteus

Not the greatest picture, but the ID is correct.
i've been to that site, and the body size of the male is smaller than the size of a dime
the only reason i don't think the second huntsman i posted was an O. giganteus was because of how large it was, i wish i could have gotten a picture of it next to something for refrence but it seemed much larger than an O. giganteus

i'm not sure how reliable these sites are but they all say the leg span is 1-3 inches, which holds true to my female who is about 2"
http://cals.arizona.edu/urbanipm/spiders/giantcrabspiders.html
http://wc.pima.edu/~bfiero/tucsonecology/animals/arth_gcsp.htm
http://www.desertmuseum.org/books/nhsd_giantcrab_spider.php

i will look into it more, it definitely has some of the same markings my female has, and its almost warm enough to start seeing them out and about down here, i'll try to catch some more this spring/summer and get some measurements.
 

Cheshire

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i've been to that site, and the body size of the male is smaller than the size of a dime
the only reason i don't think the second huntsman i posted was an O. giganteus was because of how large it was, i wish i could have gotten a picture of it next to something for refrence but it seemed much larger than an O. giganteus

i'm not sure how reliable these sites are but they all say the leg span is 1-3 inches, which holds true to my female who is about 2"
http://cals.arizona.edu/urbanipm/spiders/giantcrabspiders.html
http://wc.pima.edu/~bfiero/tucsonecology/animals/arth_gcsp.htm
http://www.desertmuseum.org/books/nhsd_giantcrab_spider.php

i will look into it more, it definitely has some of the same markings my female has, and its almost warm enough to start seeing them out and about down here, i'll try to catch some more this spring/summer and get some measurements.
Let me know how it goes...we all know I'm interested :)

If I get the time, I'll try to see what species of huntsmen are found in AZ.
 

edie

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Let me know how it goes...we all know I'm interested :)

If I get the time, I'll try to see what species of huntsmen are found in AZ.
i've been looking and they only want to tell me about the O. giganteus, i might just be stubborn but i really don't think they're the same! even they way the big one moved, it just didn't seem at all like my female, i guess there are always exceptions though and maybe i just let a monster O. giganteus get away :( i remember i was going to try and catch it with one of those cups (like the one you sent the female rosea in) and i wasn't sure if all of its legs were not going to fit and i didn't want to harm it so i didn't end up taking it inside

you'll be the first person i tell when i start seeing them out here again
 
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