False Widow Spider Care

LoveMaster1995

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
9
Hello,

Me been me i am scared to death of been killed by venom and thats why iv been looking at false widow spider. Its not a toxic but i would realy like one. Theres one problem, everywhere i look theres no care sheets. Could someone please help me out plz :)
 

anthony k

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 17, 2006
Messages
16
Hi,

Steatoda species are very easy to keep, just pop them in a jar with some twigs to build a web on and feed once or twice every couple of weeks. They will do fine at room temp and you do not realy need to use a substrate or mist them.

I notice you are in the UK, I have currently got hundreds of S.grossa slings. If you would like some for free your more than welcome if you cover postage.

If interested email me at;

antkillick@tiscali.co.uk

Cheers,

ant.
 

buthus

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 8, 2006
Messages
1,380
Yes ...a coke can would be OK. :D

When u use the common name "false widow", what Steatoda specie are u referring to?
 

Tiefling

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
3
This is where I keep my girl. Idk if you can see her up in the corner I don't think she is full sized yet. I just found her in my new apartment next to a hole scheduled to be patched so I got her outta there quick having no idea what to do. I have to keep her up high (I have a large and fearless 3 year old human boy as well)
This plastic terrarium akin byn4in?) was 6 dollars. I just threw in some twigs and a couple of leaves. The crickets seemed to appreciate the leaves until... Kinda lazy spiders but they can eat a lot and fast.
 

Attachments

Gryphus

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 12, 2019
Messages
5
Yeah Steatoda are very easy too keep, care for these are very similar to that of the Latrodectus family. As the others said just place sticks/twigs in there for the spider too build webs. I have some sort of Steatoda which I believe to be triangulosa. For the enclosure I use a small acrylic box with twigs sand at the bottom so the sticks are grounded and more stable but that is optional.

 

Gryphus

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 12, 2019
Messages
5
It honestly doesn't matter for these spiders. No they do not need sand; I just use it as a base to keep the twigs in place as well for looks. I also added a curly leaf where she tends to hide in during the day. As long as she has a place to hide and feel safe its fine.
 

NolanRobertsIntrovert

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
45
Tbh my false widow has been doing fine without twigs in her cage to anchor webs, I did that once and all she did was ignore them she is a pretty happy spider

Yeah Steatoda are very easy too keep, care for these are very similar to that of the Latrodectus family. As the others said just place sticks/twigs in there for the spider too build webs. I have some sort of Steatoda which I believe to be triangulosa. For the enclosure I use a small acrylic box with twigs sand at the bottom so the sticks are grounded and more stable but that is optional.

Look on the booty
Do you see alot of brown and white dots?
If yes then Triangulosa
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:

Cororon

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
109
Yes, it's an old thread but people search and google for information, so the more info the better. :)

Clear acrylic boxes are great, and then something the spider can anchor the web on, like twigs, a wooden structure or even the metal wire from an old lampshade will do. These spiders are used to live indoors, so they aren't that particular. Steatodas have slow metabolism so feeding once every two weeks is enough, and a tiny mist of water once in a while (not directly in the spider).
 

NolanRobertsIntrovert

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
45
Yes, it's an old thread but people search and google for information, so the more info the better. :)

Clear acrylic boxes are great, and then something the spider can anchor the web on, like twigs, a wooden structure or even the metal wire from an old lampshade will do. These spiders are used to live indoors, so they aren't that particular. Steatodas have slow metabolism so feeding once every two weeks is enough, and a tiny mist of water once in a while (not directly in the spider).
I personally just make boring enclosures
I try adding sticks but my false widow just Ignores them
She seems happier without sticks and just anchors her web trip lines to the floor
Sadly I’m in winter and she is pretty derpy
I kill her prey and drop it in
Hopefully in April I will get her a boy and see some sexy time

I’ve had my false widow since she was just born from a eggsac
Sadly when I got her her mom tried to Eat her. I saved her but she was born with a broken back leg
But she still destroys crickets
She was 1 day old when I got her :)
She now 8 months old!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Feral

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2019
Messages
408
I've kept various wild-caught native Steatoda borealis and Parasteatoda tepidariorum and others. After reading articles and studies about the webbing strategies of Latrodectus and Steatoda and other cobweb-type spiders, I now keep them in much larger enclosures than the average hobbyist might think is appropriate to accommodate their natural instincts for layout of guy lines and web structure. I have a number of Steatoda borealis in my basement and it's easy to see the research is accurate. So I changed my enclosure size to be much larger. You may want to research their web strategies for yourself.

I find sticks and anchor points to be absolutely necessary, inarguably, as these types of spiders are terrible at walking on smooth surfaces/don't have the necessary anatomical features to enable them to climb smooth surfaces like glass and plastics.
 
Last edited:

NolanRobertsIntrovert

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
45
I've kept various wild-caught native Steatoda borealis and Parasteatoda tepidariorum and others. After reading articles and studies about the webbing strategies of Latrodectus and Steatoda and other cobweb-type spiders, I now keep them in much larger enclosures than the average hobbyist might think is appropriate to accommodate their natural instincts for layout of guy lines and web structure. I have a number of Steatoda borealis in my basement and it's easy to see the research is accurate. So I changed my enclosure size to be much larger. You may want to research their web strategies for yourself.

I find sticks and anchor points to be absolutely necessary, inarguably, as these types of spiders are terrible at walking on smooth surfaces/don't have the necessary anatomical features to enable them to climb smooth surfaces like glass and plastics.
I did make a tank for a false widow once
Instead of twigs I make her enclosure like some type of garage since the false widows I find are in my garage
I’ll add like a flooring with garbage everywhere and some old stuff to use as like anchor points like pieces of cardboard that were scattered all over my garage and piece of ugly nasty paper to make like some short of hide
I mimic it as a garage
 
Top