Euscorpius sp.

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Hi,

anyone have any care tips for Euscorpius? Would be interested to hear your experiences,

Thanks

Alana
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
George (a former member of the boards) was a very knowledgable chap but Im sure there are some others. Ive kept E.tergestinus for about 8 months now and found them very easy to cater for. Its the babies that are incredibly hard to rear in this species.
If you want to know anything specific then let me know. Ive kept them in small tubs on coconut fibre or soil with one or two pieces of bark, fed them once a week and sprayed one side when its almost dry. They're in a rack that has a heat cable but are to the outside of this; so they are the scorps that I keep the coolest.
 

Rigelus

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 12, 2006
Messages
235
I have a few adult E.hadzii that i've had for half a year os so. One of my females is gravid and i'm expecting her to drop anytime soon. The other is only recently mated so it'll be next year before they come along.
I keep them in the shade and on the bottom shelf where the temperature fluctuates between 20 -24C.
My substrate is cocofibre (80%) and sand which is mildly damp with small stones and pieces of bark as furniture. Some of them like burrow down the side of the container right to the bottom (10cm's) but more often than not they'll dig a scrape under a stone of peice of bark.
My Euscorpius are good eaters so what i do is feed them well until plump and then lay of a bit. They seem to do ok with this.
I keep them seperate as when i originally received them i housed them in pairs only to discover one dead male and another couple locked in deadly combat (they weren't mating!) the following morning.

When the gravid female has had her babys and they have left her back i will seperated them into small individual specimen containers with basically the same enviroment as the adults although it'll be slightly more humid than the adults experience as my scorpling specimen containers seal tight keeping a good humidity up.

If you keep them to warm you'll never see them as they'll dig down and stay down, even at night..

/Bryan.
 

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Thanks for all the info guys.

The ones I'm getting were collected in Italy but I'm not sure of the exact species yet. I'm hoping to ID them when they arrive and will post some pics.

Cheers

Alan
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
May 29, 2004
Messages
6,543
I have no experience with Eurscorpius personally but from others I know who do, they claim they seem to do better at cooler temps than your typical Buthid species
 

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Thanks for all the great info.
I have also found a paper -
'New data on distribution and Ecology of seven species of Euscorpius' by Marco Columbo
which has some really useful habitat info on the locations where the different subspecies are found. I think it will be useful once I know exactly what species I have.

Cheers

Alan
 

G. Carnell

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 27, 2003
Messages
3,611
Hey

Euscorps are a brilliant beginner species, you're lucky! :)

get yourself a UV lamp, and you can practically see them out every night :)


and as Charlie said.. the babies are a JOKE to rear, you get unexplained deaths all the time :(
 

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Heres one of them





will try and get some better pics later for ID purposes,

Cheers,

Alan
 

Vermis

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2005
Messages
191
Nice scorps! Enjoy them.

BTW, you wouldn't happen to have a link for that paper...?
 

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Not tried a key yet but they look superficially similar to the pics of E.italicus and E.concinnus. They are from N. Italy which would match the range of these 2 subspecies.
I think a couple of the females might be gravid too although I may need a magnifying glass to sex the others! I hear the young are a challenge to rear though and I can only imagine they are microscopic judging by the adults and the scorpling I have.

Alan
 

Nazgul

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 17, 2003
Messages
801
Hi,

there´s no way id´ing Euscorpius spp by pics, even if they are of much better quality than the ones above. Most of them are to determined by the trichobothrial pattern on the chelae. Some spp are pretty polymorphic when it comes to colouration.
 

ellroy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
23
Thanks Nazgul, I may attempt to have a look through the high-powered microscope at the university over the summer now I have a species key.

In the meantime I'm working on making them as comfortable as possible. A few people have suggested they might be ok communally although I reckon the risks are the same as always. I was thinking of trying a group of adults in this setup





Its about 30cm long with a nice bit of wood with loads of crevices to hide in, I reckon 5 or 6 could lose themselves in there ok.

Planning on keeping the gravid females and smaller ones separate.

Comments and suggestions welcome.

cheers

Alan
 
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