Eurycotis floridana (Florida Woods Roach)

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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So after reading this thread, I figured I'd go out hunting for some E. floridana to begin a colony with. I have a couple friends who live in Weeki Wachee on just under an acre of land, out in the middle of nowhere. Found some millipedes, beetles, grubs, a centipede, and about 10-15 of these guys:







They're housed in a ten-gallon with some decomposing wood, soil, and leaf litter (taken from the collection site). I'm not necessarily planning on using them as feeders, although if they do end up reproducing (fingers crossed), I may entertain the idea if I get a large enough colony going.

Anyone keep these, or had success with them? I figure they should do just fine consuming the wood that's already in there, but I also figure I'd supplement with fruits, etc.

Found this, but it doesn't really have any info regarding them, just a couple pics and some cool info on other bugs we have here. ;)

I also found this, but didn't see anything I didn't already know in it.

Time to look at bugguide...

http://bugguide.net/node/view/33670#37398
http://bugguide.net/node/view/33678

Any other info is appreciated, otherwise I'll just update this thread as time progresses.
 

Anastasia

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so, those are size of B. lateralis? and looks like they climb smooth surfaces
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
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You will have babies. Oh so many babies will you have.
They are very prolific and excellent climbers.
If you keep them at 75-80 degrees with plenty of wood pieces to lay eggs on, and keep things moderately moist, the tank will be covered in them soon enough. (I keep a house gecko IN WITH my colony to help keep their numbers in check but they just keep breeding!)
Give them fruits and veggies, as well as dog/cat food to give the females extra protein for egg laying.

Did you spook one yet? I don't know why they're called skunk roaches; I absolutely love their defense odor. :p
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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Ana - they get to be close to 2" in body length; larger than lateralis. As Zeph said, they're excellent climbers, and can definitely climb smooth surfaces.

Zeph - right now the Florida room is at about 65F, so that'll probably keep their numbers low until it starts to warm up.

I spooked a few while collecting them, although most of them were pretty easy-going when I collected them. I'm aware of their odor, and definitely not a fan.

Thanks for the tips on their care. How well do you think chicken feed will work instead of dog/cat food?
 

ZephAmp

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I spooked a few while collecting them, although most of them were pretty easy-going when I collected them. I'm aware of their odor, and definitely not a fan.

Thanks for the tips on their care. How well do you think chicken feed will work instead of dog/cat food?
I read once that another fan of it says it smells like amaretto. :p

Chicken feed will work just fine.
 

Anastasia

Arachnoprince
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climbers that is a bit of a pain, have enough to watch out for escaped spiders
not talking chasing roaches on walls and ceilings, I'll though Am always looking for good source of feeders so far B dubias for large adults tarantulas and B. lats for everything else
but dubia is very smart and sneaky, they play dead is soon is they dropped in the cage, and then very very slow sideways backwards or any other way inch from under the spider, but always end up swimming in waterdish :rolleyes:
 

zonbonzovi

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Found some millipedes, beetles, grubs, a centipede:
Anything of note for us insect fetishists?:drool:

These were the beasties I was finding E. of Jacksonville. Some hick had dumped off a 55 gallon drum of oyster shells in the woods and these guys were all over it. I saw quite a few at my uncle's place up north...he kept calling them Palmetto bugs, which I guess is common?
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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I'll try to get some pics next time I see them. It's too cold for the millipedes right now, but the beetles should be pretty easy to photograph.

Yeah, the E. floridana are commonly called palmetto bugs around here, but so are all the other roaches larger than 1".
 

desertanimal

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You guys who keep climbing roaches, does fluon not keep them in? I've never seen it mentioned for containing roaches (though I don't frequent roach fora--just fora of things that eat them), and I've wondered why it wouldn't work for them.
 

Bugs In Cyberspace

Arachnodemon
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This really is a pretty species and though the photos are nice, they still don't quite do them justice. Under the right lighting they are partially translucent and their antennae are unusually long. Aside from their defensive odor they also squeak when disturbed!

They are a deeper, purer red than B. lateralis and adults have ~5 times the mass.

Love the photos and, like ZbZ, I'm interested to see what else you found. Thanks for sharing!
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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Sorry it's taken me so long to get more pictures. Finally got around to it last night and this afternoon.

If anyone has any ideas on the grub, I'd love to hear them. Very interested in knowing what it is.







Millipedes and a beetle:













There are also random isopods and snails in there.
 

zonbonzovi

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Nice haul, Joe...Narceus gordanus, Chicobolus spinigerus, Bess beetles(Passalidae family)...I think the Eurycotis floridana roaches will take to just about anything, but there are more informed keepers 'round here that may give a different answer. The grub looks similar to Dynastes tityus, but something seems off. At that size there are only a few other options in your area, to my limited knowledge.
 
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