Ephebopus uatuman Questions

ChrisTy

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I have been keeping my eye on buying an E uatuman juvie lately. I found this species extremely breath taking and am super interested in obtaining this one. I wanted to make sure I did as much research as possible though before obtaining. So far I am seeing that they are more defensive, obligate burrowers and have a higher moisture requirements (sub needs to be kept damp). Anyone have any tips, experiences, or more info to share? Also I was thinking of picking up some zoomed jungle mix for the substrate. Does this hold moisture well? Any input is greatly appreciated.
 

Chris LXXIX

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While I prefer on a personal level E.murinus, they are great. My set up is lots of inches of moist substrate -- never be a 'Scrooge' with substrate, btw :angelic: a couple of fake leaves, a piece of cork bark, water dish, done.

Never used 'zoomed jungle mix' so I don't have a clue.

I don't consider those defensive, they are speedy and just a bit nervous but that's all.
 

ChrisTy

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Ephebopus has definitely caught my interest, especially the uatuman. I will definitely be bringing this one home!
 

Andrea82

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Ephebopus has definitely caught my interest, especially the uatuman. I will definitely be bringing this one home!
Another newly fan of Ephebopus here :)
For a couple of months now i have been keeping E.murinus and E.cyanognathus, and i am definitely planning on getting the uataman as well.
Keeping these is fairly easy, if you have the moist substrate down. They need to be kept slightly warmer than other T's. Because of the humidity and warmth, i have added springtails to both the enclosures to deal with leftovers, bolus and such to prevent mold. This works very well :)
I can see both of them almost every night, sitting at the entrance of the burrow, showing their feet and fangs off :D
They're good eaters, and make it very clear when food is unwanted, they just kill it and drop the feeder in the waterdish.
They're little speed demons, like Psalmopoeus is, going from slow and stubborn to fast and flighty in the blink of an eye. I haven't seen any threat displays yet, but since mine are barely juvies i expect that to change, especially the E.murinus.
Even with the springtails, be alert to mold forming. According to another experienced keeper, Storm76, these species are actually bothered by it.
 

Timc

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I had a MM cyanognathus that wasn't messy in the least. He was so clean in fact he would shoot his poop outside the enclosure! I got home from work one day and noticed white stuff all over the book shelf I kept them on and it wasn't hard to figure out what it was. Upon closer inspection the little jerk didn't have one bit of poop in his enclosure. Fun genus. I'd love to get another.
 

Andrea82

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I had a MM cyanognathus that wasn't messy in the least. He was so clean in fact he would shoot his poop outside the enclosure! I got home from work one day and noticed white stuff all over the book shelf I kept them on and it wasn't hard to figure out what it was. Upon closer inspection the little jerk didn't have one bit of poop in his enclosure. Fun genus. I'd love to get another.
I think it is the trait of this species/genus. Murinus and cyanognathus both poop on the lid of their enclosures..funny creatures :)
 

ChrisTy

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Another newly fan of Ephebopus here :)
For a couple of months now i have been keeping E.murinus and E.cyanognathus, and i am definitely planning on getting the uataman as well.
Keeping these is fairly easy, if you have the moist substrate down. They need to be kept slightly warmer than other T's. Because of the humidity and warmth, i have added springtails to both the enclosures to deal with leftovers, bolus and such to prevent mold. This works very well :)
I can see both of them almost every night, sitting at the entrance of the burrow, showing their feet and fangs off :D
They're good eaters, and make it very clear when food is unwanted, they just kill it and drop the feeder in the waterdish.
They're little speed demons, like Psalmopoeus is, going from slow and stubborn to fast and flighty in the blink of an eye. I haven't seen any threat displays yet, but since mine are barely juvies i expect that to change, especially the E.murinus.
Even with the springtails, be alert to mold forming. According to another experienced keeper, Storm76, these species are actually bothered by it.
That is great info thank you. I completely spaced off that I would need to get springtails for the enclosure. You just made me even more excited to add this one to my ever growing collection.
 

ChrisTy

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Poor E. refuscens, always being left out. Seriously though, you should look into these guys as well.
Just looked this one up! Wow that one is amazing as well! With this ever growing wish list I'm going to have to invest in a second house just to store my collection! Lol!
 

ChrisTy

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Where can I find some good info on springtail care and stuff. I have never used them and really don't even know where to find them, or what to do with them. Completely clueless honestly. I tried looking up some info but keep pulling up pest control info. Also I would imagine any care sheets might be as reliable as those found for theraphosidae.
 

boina

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Springtail care is about as easy as it gets: Moist substrate (never let it dry out, they'll die immediately!), and then throw in any rotting veggies you can find - in small amounts, though, otherwise the mould will win. Old leaves and such is fine, too. Room temp. No water dish - they'll just drown. Just keep really moist!! Any old bucket will do, you don't even need a lid since the springtails don't willingly leave the substrate.
 

ChrisTy

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Springtail care is about as easy as it gets: Moist substrate (never let it dry out, they'll die immediately!), and then throw in any rotting veggies you can find - in small amounts, though, otherwise the mould will win. Old leaves and such is fine, too. Room temp. No water dish - they'll just drown. Just keep really moist!! Any old bucket will do, you don't even need a lid since the springtails don't willingly leave the substrate.
How many would I put into an enclosure for a 3" uatuman? Do I feed them while they are in the T enclosure? Sorry for all of the questions but like I said I am clueless here.
 

Andrea82

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How many would I put into an enclosure for a 3" uatuman? Do I feed them while they are in the T enclosure? Sorry for all of the questions but like I said I am clueless here.
That's okay ;)
Once the springtails are in the enclosure, you won't have to feed them, since they'll be eating leftovers from the T.
How many, there is no set rule about. I got a tub of them and just scooped some in with the murinus and cyanognathus. They quickly established themselves and are selfsufficient now. The ones i didn't use are still in the tub and are kept moist, and i throw in pieces of mealies, some oats, or even leftovers from other T's.
The springtails are also a good indicator of the substrate being wet enough or not. If they die off, it is too dry. And they help you spot bigger boli that need to be removed.
Very useful little critters. :)
They are used as food for tiny frogs and such, so searching for them in webshops who sell supplies for them should have them.
 

ChrisTy

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That's okay ;)
Once the springtails are in the enclosure, you won't have to feed them, since they'll be eating leftovers from the T.
How many, there is no set rule about. I got a tub of them and just scooped some in with the murinus and cyanognathus. They quickly established themselves and are selfsufficient now. The ones i didn't use are still in the tub and are kept moist, and i throw in pieces of mealies, some oats, or even leftovers from other T's.
The springtails are also a good indicator of the substrate being wet enough or not. If they die off, it is too dry. And they help you spot bigger boli that need to be removed.
Very useful little critters. :)
They are used as food for tiny frogs and such, so searching for them in webshops who sell supplies for them should have them.
Thank you again! Feeling much more confident now.
 

ChrisTy

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Well I finally got it! Boy oh Boy did this one keep me on my toes! Very fast and very quick to stand its ground, but I am loving it! was only able to get pics through the enclosure since it was pretty adamant DSCN0036.JPG DSCN0033.JPG DSCN0035.JPG DSCN0037.JPG about me not messing around with it any further....
 

Andrea82

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