E. Longiceps caresheet

Ephesians

Arachnobaron
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Sep 12, 2002
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Does anyone have any care info on Eucrastocleus longiceps? I'm looking into some good species to aquire at the ATS. Does anyone have some suggestions? Bill, Dave? My list is blank on what to try and aquire, but I definately don't wanna come back empty handed. Most of all I'm looking for a few good display Ts, well in size and eating habits. I don't wanna limit my list to just those, because I wouldn't mind a King Baboon or a Featherleg. But other than suggestions and back to the main point...does anyone have info. on Eucrastocleus longiceps? Thanks in advance.

In HIm,
Marcus
 

Ephesians

Arachnobaron
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Ooh..ohh..what about Eucratoscelus pachypu? And yes, if anyone wanders...I'm going through John Hoke's gallery on e-spiderworld. hehe.

Marcus
 

RugbyDave

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This is the OTHER dave writing, but just the same:
Found the closest thing:

Range: The Tanzanian Stoutleg Baboon may be found in northern Tanzania and southern Kenya.

Habitat: Dry scrubland; savannas

Size: Small for a tarantula. Fully grown, they're about 4 to 4 1/2 inches in legspan.

Attitude: Somewhat more docile than their Pterinochilus ssp. cousins, but by no means a "hand pet."

Dwelling: Burrows in dry earth, but can make a webbed retreat

Ideal Setup: a 2 1/2 to 5 gallon container with enough substrate for digging in (fill it 3-5" deep). Supply a water dish, but there is no need for misting as this species likes it dry.

Food: Any bugs that haven't been exposed to pesticides (2-5 crickets a week).

not the longiceps, but closest to it. I'd say (if youre not sure as of yet), keep it as an Usumbara, untill you can find out for sure!
 

RugbyDave

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aha! I found this though, my friend:

Truly beautiful animals, Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas ("Featherlegs") can make amazing pets. With their interesting burrowing skills and their lovely appearance, keeping a Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula or observing one in the wild can be a fascinating experience.

Often found in dryer tropical areas or savannas with very short wet seasons, Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas can burrow into the earth. Often, Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas spin silk webs over the tops of their burrows and further block them with discarded earth. Usually, they hunt insects or other invertebrates and may also eat small vertebrate animals. Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas tend to be fairly aggressive, though they will give a warning display before releasing their defense mechanism, urticating hairs that can cause skin irritation and itching.

The Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula grows to about four inches in length at maturity. It is a stocky bodied tarantula with thick legs, as its name implies. Covered in grayish brown hair, the Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula can also range in shade from sooty gray to reddish brown. The thorax tends to have less hair than the rest of the body, making it lighter colored in appearance. Even the legs of the Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula are furry. This fuzzy appearance has given the Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula the name of Feather Legged Baboon Tarantula.

Native to the more tropical regions of Africa, the Stout Legged Baboon Tarantula is also kept in captivity as a pet. They are found in areas with soil that can allow them to burrow, where there is low humidity and moisture.


Specific Care Information: Relative Care Ease: 8/10

Because Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas are native to dry regions, they should be kept well ventilated. Any water bowls placed in the cage should be small enough that they will not soak the substrate if tipped, as excessive moisture can harm Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas. They may be fed insects or small vertebrates. Because they should be allowed to burrow, Stout Legged Baboon Tarantulas should be kept on a natural substrate such as topsoil. These tarantulas are deep burrowers that should be provided with a thick, compact substrate layer; vertically oriented enclosures nearly filled substrate work well. You should remember to leave enough space at the top of the enclosure to accommodate the tarantula when it is on the surface and the soil it will displace to make its burrow.
---

so there you go!
from centralpets.com

enjoy man!
great T!
peace
the other dave
 

rob

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Cool species...

urticating hairs that can cause skin irritation and itching
Are you sure this old worlder uses urticating hairs as a defense? My stoutleg has never done that and actually is much less temperamental than my Usumbara. It does like it dry though. It will place substrate inside of its water dish so I never mist and I clean fill the water dish twice a week at most. It uses a small flower pot as a hide and has used a combination of webbing and substrate to block off the front except for a small funnel shaped opening which it uses for access to its retreat, but it only comes out at night. Pretty cool species. Did I mention that it likes it dry?;)
 

RugbyDave

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I don't know -- like i said, i found that on centralpets.com

Yes, they do like it dry :)

peace,
dave
 

conipto

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That Central Pets site is chock full of misinformation. They even put B. vagans and H. lividum in the same class for temperant, and then stick A. genic in with the redknees, iirc.

Bill
 

RugbyDave

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geez. I just flipped back through the webpage and some of the people that post on there totally have it wrong, your right conipto!!! (like GBB is like a curlyhair?!)

I've never really gone there before, but the guy who wrote it is real into T's (it seems), and all his other info's pretty straight up...

Some of the people that post on there are also on here sometimes. There are people on there who know what they're talking aboutm but i guess they may be far and few between :)

At any rate, its a good look at how one guy keeps his longiceps. I'd venture that its not too bad untill you can talk to someone at ATS perhaps, if no-one gets back to you from on here...

good luck!
peace
dave
 

RugbyDave

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Although i must say that its the people who register and put info up, not a central source, you know.

And I suppose alot of people rate the aggressiveness/defensiveness based, it seems, on their own T's.

I don't know. I'd stay away from a source like that, but he seemed straight on the dot with his longiceps info.

ya know?
peace
dave
 

belewfripp

Arachnobaron
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In my experience E. constrictus (formerly longiceps) is one of the more mild-mannered Old World tarantulas. I have handled mine on several occasions and while they will sometimes rear up in threat posture, especially if bugged while in their burrow, they are usually pretty laid back. They do not possess urticating bristles and tend to like it fairly dry. They do not seem to be as tolerant to dryness as Usumbaras, but they are close. I keep a water dish in with mine and occasionally -- if it is really dry like in the dead of winter with indoor heating -- dribble a small amount of water into the substrate. That may not be necessary, but it seems like it helps some. They do not get very large, maybe about 4 and half inches in legspan.
A good choice but not really a display T as they will dig if you let them (though the sight of their bushy rear legs and abdomen sticking out of the burrow entrance, their typical pose, is interesting to see).

Adrian
 
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Ephesians

Arachnobaron
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Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
353
Thanks a lot, all of you. I appreciate the help and information, and expeically all the time Dave and...Dave? put into it. hehe. It was all very helpful whether on the bullseye accurate or not, it provided me with a general outlook. Thanks again, I appreciate the comments.

In Him,
Marcus
 
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