Dozens of Black Spots on Bald Abdomen

Danahan

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I've had this A. seemani for three years after rescuing her from a little "shop of horrors" pet store. She seldom leaves her log retreat, but still has a throughly large bald spot on her abdomen. When she left her retreat last night to pay her water dish a visit, I noticed a dozen or so strange black spots on her abdomen. I'm assuming they are from a new carapace growing underneath since she should be up for a molt. But could they be mites of some sort? Or could it be some sort of fungal infection? This is the best pic I could get, because of her ackward position, but I could try to get more!

 

RoseT

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Sep 20, 2010
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A closer picture could be more helpful. Could help tell if its a mite issue or not, although imo those spots look a bit too big for that. Im saying as long as your spider has no obvious signs that its bothered, other than the bald spot..Do you handle it much?.. It could be normal. Im not a professional though just my thoughts. Good luck, and beautiful T.
 

paassatt

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Clicking on the small picture will open a new window to the link in the gallery where the picture is. I'm also curious to know what they are. I've never seen that before.
 

RoseT

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I did see that, but still couldnt figure it out...Very curious to see what it could be, I too have seen nothing like it...
 

crawltech

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I've had this A. seemani for three years after rescuing her from a little "shop of horrors" pet store. She seldom leaves her log retreat, but still has a throughly large bald spot on her abdomen. When she left her retreat last night to pay her water dish a visit, I noticed a dozen or so strange black spots on her abdomen. I'm assuming they are from a new carapace growing underneath since she should be up for a molt. But could they be mites of some sort? Or could it be some sort of fungal infection? This is the best pic I could get, because of her ackward position, but I could try to get more!

the carapace doesnt form under the back of the abdomen.......

....kinda looks like freckels.....hmm, i have never seen that before.....maybe a type of tarantula skin cancer???
 

Danahan

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I just noticed in the last picture that there appears to be 3-4 white specks in the area above the bald spot. Could those be mites?
 

Abby

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I had similar spots with my P. scrofa. He molted out fine and the molt had the same black spots on the inside of it.
I don't know what they were, but my P. scrofa is doing well. :)
 

rustym3talh3ad

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not to give to much into an answer i have seen this before, it was on a few extremely old MM's that were well on their way out...but like i said it doesnt really answer anything, just saying i have seen it before. could age have something to do with these spots? or perhaps weak points in the exo where the T has kicked away the hair, but then continued to kick causing small lesions?
 

kean

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or maybe moles.. haven't seen that before.. that's interesting.. i hope everything is fine with your T..
 

esotericman

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They are not cancer or moles or any sort of over growth. These are not animals with a skin folks, no insult intended, we just have to think outside the mammal box.

As Abby points out, the next molt will be fine, as this is an external feature of the exoskeleton. I have seen these spots before, and always associated with animals which have flicked themselves bare and continue to flick. My theory is that the spots are similar to "scar" tissue where scleriterization has occurred were microabrasions have worn down the abdominal wall. As the spots occur on the inside to match the outside, but do not carry over to the new exoskeleton, it is only a surface issue. The best way to know is to take the exuvium, run it through paraffin sections, and see what the spots look like compared to the healthy areas.

In other words, they're "scabs" from a very nervous animal flicking itself too hard and will molt out of it.

Address the stress and you won't see it again.
 

Danahan

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Even after three years, this specimen is still strung out beyond belief -- she still hasn't settled down completely. The pet store I rescued her from had a reptile light on her with no retreat whatsoever, and her water source consisted of a dry sponge. I have a really nice enclosure for her with a retreat that she loves! She has only molted once since I've had her, and I'm looking forward to the next molt.
 
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