Do slings normally die this much?!?!?!

JRGreen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
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13
Ok… looks like I am about to have my 3rd sling death out of 5 in the next couple of days. I started on Ts in July, so am a noob, but have read quite a bit so I do know a little bit.

The first died by crushing (we think) when attempting to burrow in coconut husk.

The second died unable to complete a molt, with part of body out, part in.

Now my G. Pulchra is walking funny, suggesting to me it somewhere go exposed to pesticides. It lives in my office, so I am not total master of the environment, but don't know of any spraying which has been done. I did bring it home and place it in ICU, and am hoping for the best.

Bad luck, common losses with 1/4-1/2 inch slings, or do I need a new hobby?

Thanks!
Jorin
 

Hobo

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
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Don't think it can die by getting "crushed" by digging coco husk, at that size they can easily dig their way out of anything, including cave ins.

How cold does it get in the office at night?
Mine shuts off all heating and stuff to go green, and it's absolutely frigid by morning. If not, the constant heating in the winter weather might be sucking all the moisture from their vials/sub/enclosures.

Pesticides might be a problem too; My office has these sprayers that go off intermittently in the bathrooms, for instance. Who knows what else they do on weekends pest wise.

The office isn't the best place for tarantulas (or any other pets) IMHO.

Good luck though, don't give up! Maybe try a juvie or adult instead.
 

spiderslight

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 15, 2008
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42
The Real questions that i have coming to my mind is how is the water situation in the tanks? All T's need some form of water in the tank to survive. And depending on the Type of T is going to depend on home much water they need. but they do need some and babies are more likely to have problems without water. The flip side is to much can hurt them too.
 

Widowman10

Arachno WIDOW
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my first thought was something to do with water. whether that be access to drinking water, internal humidity, etc.
 

GPulchra

Arachnoknight
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Jul 21, 2010
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279
I think you guys are over-analyzing this situation. JRGreen, here is the answer you are looking for: no.
 

KoriTamashii

Arachnobaron
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Nov 21, 2009
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Yes, but my intent was to be humorous.
Love ya, kiddo, but I don't think the OP came here looking for jokes.

It just sounds like you've hit a spot of bad luck, JR.

Perhaps its time to try just keeping the T's at home, and out of the office, where chemicals are EVERYWHERE.

Either way, good luck!
 

barabootom

Arachnolord
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Mar 1, 2008
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617
Perhaps its time to try just keeping the T's at home, and out of the office, where chemicals are EVERYWHERE.
I agree with this completely. Chemical deaths could be a likely culprit. Where my wife works they spray pesticides twice a year without warning and the weekly cleaning crew uses all kinds of chemicals.
 

Bill S

Arachnoprince
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Oct 2, 2006
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1,399
I've raised lots of slings, and the mortality rate you're suffering is high. Following along with Hobo, Barabootom and a couple others - The office environment is somewhat out of your control, so you'd be better raising the slings at home.

Moisture/drinking water could be an issue, at least in the molt problem. Temperature too. Night temps might be much cooler in your office than is good for slings. (I lost an emperor scorpion that I kept in my office once due to this. Over Christmas break someone decided to save energy by shutting off all heating and power to the building, but didn't bother to notify any of the occupants.) Pesticides could be an issue - if your office shares an air handling system with other offices in your building you could get pesticides drifting in from a neighbor. But frankly, I'd bet on temperature and humidity issues first.

Good luck.
 

JRGreen

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
13
Update, and thanks

Thank you all for the responses (yes, even the "no" was, in fact, helpful and reflective of my humor, too.)

Checked on Robbie (yes, that is the T's name), and he isn't moving. I don't think he is dead, as feet are still gripping and he isn't in death curl yet, but I don't think this looks good. The funny walk suggested chemicals to me, too, as he just molted about 10 days ago.

My office is on independent heater, and I keep it a touch warm for his comfort. Chemicals aren't likely, but I am going to check. My office is in a small building on our campus, and it is pretty tight community, so it will be easy to check. Think the replacement will be in the 1-1.5" range. Our other 2 seem to be fine, even if they like to burrow. B. alpos, and the larger one likes to disappear for days.

As for water, I don't have a dish for them, as they are still too small, but am watering peat to keep humidity up. This year, our humidity is high, too, due to rain, so I don't think that is the issue. Robbie is in humid ICU, and not helping.

He is G. pulchra, if that sheds any light on the water issue. Checking his cage 1-2 times/week, usually needing to add a bit of moisture for him/her (too small to know yet).

So if I am understanding correctly, attrition rates are high among the little ones? How big to get them past the most dangerous phase?

Thank you all again. Much appreciated.
Jorin
 

Bill S

Arachnoprince
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So if I am understanding correctly, attrition rates are high among the little ones? How big to get them past the most dangerous phase?
I have not had high attrition rates among the little ones, but they do need a little more care than big ones. (Or at least I fuss over mine much more as little ones.) For me (living in a desert) dryness is the major concern - tiny spiders are more subject to dessication than big ones. Also, it can be more difficult to find the right size food for little guys. By the time they're big enough to take adult crickets, they are very easy to take care of.
 

2oCHEVYo0

Arachnosquire
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Aug 29, 2010
Messages
67
Get em out of the office would be my suggestion and try them at home... If you are losing so many there is something going on at that office you may not know about. The chemicals people use to clean are all VERY deadly for insects. So, get em out of there and try raising them at your house for awhile to see if things change.
 

madamoisele

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 28, 2010
Messages
141
I had a Trinidad Chevron sling die on me, and the guy who gave it to me replaced it. And then the replacement died. I'm left scratching my head, because the other two slings (one a Trinidad Chevron, one a H.B.B.E.) are fat and sassy.

So far, at any rate. Really worried the Trinidad won't be making it to even juvie.
 
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