D. azureus Blue Poison Frog

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Arachnodemon
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I kept these and numerous other Poison frogs for a couple years. They are beautiful and surprisingly active, but I found them to be a little too demanding for my tastes. I just had too many pets and something had to go. Although, I still find myself looking at them at every reptile show...
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Very cool. They are beautiful frogs. I have no plans to keep them anytime soon, but I always stop to catch a glimpse of them at every show. Fascinating animals. :)

Bry
 

Philth

N.Y.H.C.
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I just got some of these. They are C.B. babies, they also seem to have trouble catching there food. What did you feed yours ?
 

Tangled WWWeb

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Originally posted by Philth
I just got some of these. They are C.B. babies, they also seem to have trouble catching there food. What did you feed yours ?

I fed them fruitflies when they were smaller along with pinhead crickets when they got larger. What size container are you keeping your frogs in? IME, younger frogs need a smaller, less complicated enclosure in order for them to capture prey more easily.
 

Ultimate Instar

Arachnobaron
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I've been keeping D. azureus for approximately four years. I feed them wingless fruit flies dusted with Herptivite and Rep-Cal. They seem healthy and have reproduced. I have not noticed any difficulty with feeding, even though they are in a 60-gal tank with a lot of wood and plants. If anything, they tend to wrestle with each other a lot (and I'm not just talking about mating!). They are territorial to some degree and females will sabotage each other's eggs by piercing the yolk with their tongues. Since I have seven frogs in my tank, I put about 200 fruit flies in at once, and I sprinkle them around. Otherwise, I notice that the larger (usually female) frogs will chase away the others until they have finished eating. A smaller, simpler cage might make it easier for the frogs to find the food; however, these frogs have been known to kill each other under certain circumstances.

Karen N.
 

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Arachnodemon
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The frog in my pic is in a 37 gallon aquarium that is very well planted. I also never encountered any problems with my adults finding their food. I did however, notice that as froglets, not all of them were as adept as others at hunting. At the breeders advice, I started mine in small simple enclosures and worked them up. This may have been completely unnecessary, but I did not encounter any problems. I definitely did not intend to imply for you to leave them in such a set-up when they are mature.


John
 
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