Critique, tips and suggestions for the quality of photos

Sterls

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 1, 2018
Messages
446
A ring light can be useful, especially for photographing Ts that aren't staying perfectly still (mine rarely seem to).

I use one and it allows me to keep the shutter speed up while also providing enough light to get a good picture. Only downside is most Ts will only tolerate so much direct light, and then they start moving even more. My light came with a soft white attachment that makes it less direct.
 

JPG

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
105
I can tell from reading your posts you don't have any knowledge of photography beyond automatic of substance- that's fine- most people don't anymore sadly. W/that said, I will also advise that you forget about focus-stacking. If you really want to get into focus-stacking you will need new lenses, special equipment and a working knowledge of basic photography in my opinion. I have a friend of mine who is an expert in focus-stacking, the images are impressive. Generally most people can't tell they are looking at a focus-stacked image. Thus they try to make a great image, using focus-stacking as their EXAMPLE. Not saying you are doing that, but if you are, it's a recipe for failure. There is no comparison between general, macro photo, and focus-stacking macro.

W/that said- take your time. I can't say how you learn, but I learned, and still learn, by taking my camera out, and shooting tons of images, different settings etc with 1 lens. I don't hop around.

Once you have mastered the limitations of your system, then see if focus-stacking is for you. I've done focus-stacking of a different type for over a decade, it's not trivial.
Yes I just got my first camera and never really been into photography in my life. Ever since I begun my tarantula hobby my interest in photography spiked up and I'm now willing to learn what I can for the rest of my life.

I'm not trying to be professional or anything but I do want to produce the best outcome with what I have. Past few weeks I've only figured out how to manipulate the f-stop and shutter speed and few other functions. Thanks to @basin79 I now have learned to take better quality photos with changing ISO as well.

Focus stacking isn't really a necessity for me at the moment but once I have nothing else to practice I would love to learn to enhance my photo that way. I've seen a lot of arachnid.addicted's photos and assuming majority of his are stacked images?

I'm mostly using my cheap 60mm macro lens (bought to see if photography is really my thing) for tarantula photos, sometimes 25mm to take photo of entire enclosure. I'm hoping to upgrade my lens and maybe a camera as well once I'm past the basic level, any idea when would be a good time to upgrade?
 
Last edited:

JPG

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
105
A ring light can be useful, especially for photographing Ts that aren't staying perfectly still (mine rarely seem to).

I use one and it allows me to keep the shutter speed up while also providing enough light to get a good picture. Only downside is most Ts will only tolerate so much direct light, and then they start moving even more. My light came with a soft white attachment that makes it less direct.
I'm currently using https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0859FD2QF/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Would ring light be better choice than this one? The tarantula doesnt seem to mind the brightness so far, it's giving me a decent result depending on the fstop and shutter speed.
 

Sterls

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 1, 2018
Messages
446
I'm currently using https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0859FD2QF/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Would ring light be better choice than this one? The tarantula doesnt seem to mind the brightness so far, it's giving me a decent result depending on the fstop and shutter speed.
One half dozen the other. I like the ring light because it moves with the camera, so the lighting is more consistent. Most of the time I have an overhead lamp pointed towards the enclosure too.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
13,766
Yes I just got my first camera and never really been into photography in my life. Ever since I begun my tarantula hobby my interest in photography spiked up and I'm now willing to learn what I can for the rest of my life.

I'm not trying to be professional or anything but I do want to produce the best outcome with what I have. Past few weeks I've only figured out how to manipulate the f-stop and shutter speed and few other functions. Thanks to @basin79 I now have learned to take better quality photos with changing ISO as well.

Focus stacking isn't really a necessity for me at the moment but once I have nothing else to practice I would love to learn to enhance my photo that way. I've seen a lot of arachnid.addicted's photos and assuming majority of his are stacked images?

I'm mostly using my cheap 60mm macro lens (bought to see if photography is really my thing) for tarantula photos, sometimes 25mm to take photo of entire enclosure. I'm hoping to upgrade my lens and maybe a camera as well once I'm past the basic level, any idea when would be a good time to upgrade?
Couldn’t tell you- can’t predict when you will need to upgrade- depends on how much time you have to become great with what you have.

What post-processing software are you using?

When I get a chance I’ll link you to the greatest macro photographer from AB, he’s been in National Geographic- he’s self taught.

Then I’ll link you to another AB member who was inspired by the first I’m alluding to.

They are the 2 best macro guys for Ts
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,784
Yes I just got my first camera and never really been into photography in my life. Ever since I begun my tarantula hobby my interest in photography spiked up and I'm now willing to learn what I can for the rest of my life.

I'm not trying to be professional or anything but I do want to produce the best outcome with what I have. Past few weeks I've only figured out how to manipulate the f-stop and shutter speed and few other functions. Thanks to @basin79 I now have learned to take better quality photos with changing ISO as well.

Focus stacking isn't really a necessity for me at the moment but once I have nothing else to practice I would love to learn to enhance my photo that way. I've seen a lot of arachnid.addicted's photos and assuming majority of his are stacked images?

I'm mostly using my cheap 60mm macro lens (bought to see if photography is really my thing) for tarantula photos, sometimes 25mm to take photo of entire enclosure. I'm hoping to upgrade my lens and maybe a camera as well once I'm past the basic level, any idea when would be a good time to upgrade?
AA's pics are single shot. Higher F stop and a greater distance you can get pretty much the whole tarantula in focus should you wish.

Then if you want a front on shot you could maybe hit down to F13. But again it's all about what YOU want. You can move around so those "selections" I typed about can be made to be more on the same angle so even though you're on a lower F stop there's still a good amount in focus etcetera. Some examples below.

F14
1817BEB2-C449-4184-B52B-4E420CFA47ED.jpeg

F20
68DE8A5B-F228-45E9-A07D-2CA2F31D0D4A.jpeg

F5
98210EEA-CBDD-4B22-8B1E-34500A2CF024.jpeg

F13
D43C3518-6F16-4D8B-8C0D-D427463CD64B.jpeg

F10
8DBC03C5-435F-40B5-824D-DFC624E7F337.jpeg

F8
FE83110D-5CE1-446A-A4A6-A2605E0CA7B7.jpeg

Decide what YOU want. What shot are you looking for? Then work to get it. And there will be loads of times you'll see your pics and think, "I should have done this or that different" or "I wish I'd have picked up on that detail" but that's all part of it. Sometimes I'll sit down and look through what I thought would be great pics to find the bloody camera screen has lied to me and they're all awful. It's annoying but they're easily deleted and I'll try again another time.

You will get frustrated at some point. What you want to achieve you just won't be able to due to X or Y. But then you'll see another angle and get something completely different that you'll love.
 

advan

oOOo
Staff member
Joined
Apr 11, 2010
Messages
2,062
Keep ISO as low as you possibly can.
I would not recommend a ring flash as there is no way to diffuse it properly and the reflections look terrible IMO.
Look for the flash/diffuser reflections in the subjects eyes of photos you like, you can normally get an idea of their flash set-up. ;)
Always get the eyes in focus, just like with people, we look at the eyes first. For a full spider shot, most won't notice or care the far legs are out of focus.
 

Scorpiobsession

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2021
Messages
251
AA's pics are single shot. Higher F stop and a greater distance you can get pretty much the whole tarantula in focus should you wish.

Then if you want a front on shot you could maybe hit down to F13. But again it's all about what YOU want. You can move around so those "selections" I typed about can be made to be more on the same angle so even though you're on a lower F stop there's still a good amount in focus etcetera. Some examples below.

F14
View attachment 376802

F20
View attachment 376803

F5
View attachment 376804

F13
View attachment 376805

F10
View attachment 376806

F8
View attachment 376807

Decide what YOU want. What shot are you looking for? Then work to get it. And there will be loads of times you'll see your pics and think, "I should have done this or that different" or "I wish I'd have picked up on that detail" but that's all part of it. Sometimes I'll sit down and look through what I thought would be great pics to find the bloody camera screen has lied to me and they're all awful. It's annoying but they're easily deleted and I'll try again another time.

You will get frustrated at some point. What you want to achieve you just won't be able to due to X or Y. But then you'll see another angle and get something completely different that you'll love.
These pictures are great. What mm lens did you use for pictures #3, 5, 6? About how far away were you from them when you took those pictures?
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,784
These pictures are great. What mm lens did you use for pictures #3, 5, 6? About how far away were you from them when you took those pictures?
I only have 1 lens. Sony's 90mm macro. I'll have been around 15-25cm away probably. I take their pics whilst they're in their enclosures so I'm governed by just how close I can get.
 

JPG

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
105
Couldn’t tell you- can’t predict when you will need to upgrade- depends on how much time you have to become great with what you have.

What post-processing software are you using?

When I get a chance I’ll link you to the greatest macro photographer from AB, he’s been in National Geographic- he’s self taught.

Then I’ll link you to another AB member who was inspired by the first I’m alluding to.

They are the 2 best macro guys for Ts
Sorry I didn't even realize this thread is still active, I'm actually not using any post-processing software although I do have Photoshop.
Been busy with a lot of non-tarantula things but now I'm back to start more photography practice.
 

JPG

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
105
AA's pics are single shot. Higher F stop and a greater distance you can get pretty much the whole tarantula in focus should you wish.

Then if you want a front on shot you could maybe hit down to F13. But again it's all about what YOU want. You can move around so those "selections" I typed about can be made to be more on the same angle so even though you're on a lower F stop there's still a good amount in focus etcetera. Some examples below.

F14
View attachment 376802

F20
View attachment 376803

F5
View attachment 376804

F13
View attachment 376805

F10
View attachment 376806

F8
View attachment 376807

Decide what YOU want. What shot are you looking for? Then work to get it. And there will be loads of times you'll see your pics and think, "I should have done this or that different" or "I wish I'd have picked up on that detail" but that's all part of it. Sometimes I'll sit down and look through what I thought would be great pics to find the bloody camera screen has lied to me and they're all awful. It's annoying but they're easily deleted and I'll try again another time.

You will get frustrated at some point. What you want to achieve you just won't be able to due to X or Y. But then you'll see another angle and get something completely different that you'll love.
Looks like I'm still gonna need to try alot of different things, they are looking amazing!
This was with F11 but seems like it's no where close yet.
DSCF1348.jpg
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,784
Looks like I'm still gonna need to try alot of different things, they are looking amazing!
This was with F11 but seems like it's no where close yet.
View attachment 393240
I read you aren't editing your shots. Editing makes all the different and is something you learn and get better at the more you edit. The difference is night and day.
 

JPG

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2019
Messages
105
I read you aren't editing your shots. Editing makes all the different and is something you learn and get better at the more you edit. The difference is night and day.
You are 100% right. I also changed to Raw instead of Fine image and holy carapace it's looking much better now.
Thank you all for your helps, looks like I'm making some progress.
 
Last edited:

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,784
You are 100% right. I also changed to Raw instead of Fine image and holy carapace it's looking much better now.
Thank you all for your helps, looks like I'm making some progress.
Oh definitely shoot RAW. Gives you much more scope to edit.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
748
Sorry I didn't even realize this thread is still active, I'm actually not using any post-processing software although I do have Photoshop.
Been busy with a lot of non-tarantula things but now I'm back to start more photography practice.
Even something as simple as a few minutes in adobe Lightroom can change a photo
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,784
Even something as simple as a few minutes in adobe Lightroom can change a photo
That's exactly what I do. Couple of mins in lightroom, export to my phone. Then a few little touches in the lightroom app and done. I absolutely don't take full advantage of all the features because I don't know how too. But to be honest if it takes me more than a few mins to edit a pic I just wouldn't be arsed to do it.
 
Top