Could the Tannins in Tea Be Toxic?

Amanda

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
652
I'm setting up a new vivarium, and would like to darken the color of a branch of grapevine. Tinting it with tea seems like the safest option. My guess is that the tea should be completely harmless, but I'm throwing it out here just in case. Any expert input??
 

DrAce

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
768
I'm setting up a new vivarium, and would like to darken the color of a branch of grapevine. Tinting it with tea seems like the safest option. My guess is that the tea should be completely harmless, but I'm throwing it out here just in case. Any expert input??
Completely safe... unless you have a tarantula that likes licking/sucking hard on the branch. Tannins like to be stuck to things. Even if the spider was sucking hard, those who have had tea stains know that they don't like to come out (why they make good stains for wood). Furthermore, they are all over the place naturally.

I can't see any problem.
 

Amanda

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
652
That was quick! Thanks for the definitive answer. :clap:
 

Arachnophiliac

Arachnosquire
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Aug 6, 2003
Messages
128
I'm setting up a new vivarium, and would like to darken the color of a branch of grapevine. Tinting it with tea seems like the safest option. My guess is that the tea should be completely harmless, but I'm throwing it out here just in case. Any expert input??
The tannins would be no problem, as they are not actually poisonous and as already pointed out the spider would not likely ingest any. As a side point, I often throw dried Oak leaves (which are rich in tannins) into my substrate mixtures with very positive results! Cheers,
Bruce
 

Arachnophiliac

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 6, 2003
Messages
128
Hmm... Positive how?
Oak leaves are a good soil conditioner, which promotes healthy soil. The issue of substrate is a hot one, with people on both sides of the organic/sterile fence. I am of the organic bent and make my soils healthy by promoting good fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms (like springtails). This makes for a self cleaning substrate that makes for not only healthy spiders, but happy ones too :) I have been keeping tarantulas for 21 years (and other invertebrates even longer!), and have had great success even with "difficult" species! Cheers,
Bruce
 
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