Constant rehousing

Petah Parkah

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 18, 2017
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54
I just got a new T and I need to rehouse him a few times this week because of habitat issues, is this going to be a problem?
 

TownesVanZandt

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Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,034
What kind of habitat issues will make it necessary to rehouse it a few times in a week? Most Ts will need some time to adjust to its new environment. This might take anywhere from a couple of days to several months. If you rehouse them too often, they will never have the time to settle down and you will have a constantly stressed spider.
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
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Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,583
Perhaps do it right the first time? I don't understand why you would need to rehouse so many times in one week.

It will be stressful to to the spider but it should be perfectly fine in the end.
 

Tatarita

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 4, 2016
Messages
96
Please dont rehouse him so often in one week. He's probably already stressed out from the new environment. All he needs right now is a properly ventilated enclosure, a hide, adequate substrate and a water dish. It took my T a long time to adjust to a new enclosure and even changing the substrate in her existing enclosure stresses her out.
 

Tomoran

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Messages
239
The short answer is, yes...it'll be fine in the long run. That said, rehousings can be very stressful for them, and your new acquisition is going to take some time to settle in when you finally finish changing its environment. You really want to try to limit the amount of disruptions after the initial rehousing. Personally, when I know I'm going to get a new T, I try to set up the enclosure well in advance so it's ready to go by the time the animal arrives. That way, if I need to swap out bad substrate, increase the ventilation, or rearrange it, I can do so before the cage is inhabited.

Just out of curiosity, what type of habitat issues necessitated the need for all of the rehousings?
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,693
Keep in mind an important thing, you live in the Philippines... you have already a somewhat perfect 'natural' parameters, so I suggest to not exaggerate with humidity, especially with your G.pulchripes.
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
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Sep 14, 2014
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2,007
Habitat issues? Do you have mites or some sort of pest you're trying to eradicate?
 

Petah Parkah

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
54
The short answer is, yes...it'll be fine in the long run. That said, rehousings can be very stressful for them, and your new acquisition is going to take some time to settle in when you finally finish changing its environment. You really want to try to limit the amount of disruptions after the initial rehousing. Personally, when I know I'm going to get a new T, I try to set up the enclosure well in advance so it's ready to go by the time the animal arrives. That way, if I need to swap out bad substrate, increase the ventilation, or rearrange it, I can do so before the cage is inhabited.

Just out of curiosity, what type of habitat issues necessitated the need for all of the rehousings?
The first time I housed it my cat pissed inside the enclosure( i took off the lid because of some cat poop) when I came back the enclosure had a puddle at the side. Good thing my t was in the shelter. Then I placed her in a spare food container for a few hrs then I'm moving her back after I cleaned the other one out
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,034
The first time I housed it my cat pissed inside the enclosure( i took off the lid because of some cat poop) when I came back the enclosure had a puddle at the side. Good thing my t was in the shelter. Then I placed her in a spare food container for a few hrs then I'm moving her back after I cleaned the other one out

:wideyed:

Lol, what did I just read? Better keep that cat away from the enclosure in the future! :rofl:
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,759
Why is the OP keeping a T where another animal can get to it....that's poor husbandry. Someone else should own that T perhaps.
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
88
:wideyed:

Lol, what did I just read? Better keep that cat away from the enclosure in the future! :rofl:
These are some sound words of advice but on top of this you should never leave the lid of your Ts enclosure unattended, if the cat had enough time to mark the enclosure enough time also elapsed that some very bad things could have happened. You cat could have swiped at it, unless your cats declawed a good swipe is quite capable inflicting a wound that your new pet would not have recovered from. Another likely scenario was your T could have fled attempted to escape and finding a lost T is not a easy feat and is often failed attempt.

My goal here is not to lecture you, but bring to your attention how badly this could have gone to so something like this does not happen again with worse results
 
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