complicated molts

T. blondi

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
23
We've lost so many to that, I was wondering if it's a common thing with T's.

Many of ours got out of their exuvia ok but the next day would be in the corner legs curled underneath. Others would come out of the molt and would move around fine, but then would starve themselfs to death. Which was the saddest part mainly becuase I had to watch their abdomen shrivel up and look like a raisin.

We can't understand it; the room temperature, humidity, food and substrate never changed from the day that they were eating. Their cages are always clean, and their substrate is sterile vermiculite. No sponges for contamination, nothing. We have a P. ornata right now in the other room dieing with it's legs curling underneath it. It's saddened my mother to the point that she thinks it's her fault and doesn't want to expand her collection.
 

kellygirl

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2002
Messages
1,056
i lost a curly sling that very way a few weeks ago. it was my first tarantula death. :( i get so excited when my little guys molt and it's so disappointing to come in the next morning to find a little dead one. :( i guess molting is just very stressful.

kellygirl
 

Midwest Art

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
280
Sheds

Yes sometimes despite all or the right conditions (humidity) , a T may have a bad molt. Some even have a hard time right after molt if the substrate is too humid (M. robustum, C. crawshayi) as they are succeptible to fungal infections.

T's are hardy little animals, one T. blondi 1 incher out of a large batch came in missing 4 legs. It could only crawl around, but it fed, I fed it waxworms. It shed shortly thereafter and regrew all legs and looked completely normal.

Never under any circumstances attempt to "rescue" a T that has a bad molt (legs stuck etc.) As it's book lungs haven't hardened yet, startling the T will surely kill it. It's hard to resist the temptation of rescuing a poor animal but even the best intentions can result in disaster. Always let a T harden up a few days (for spiderlings) to several weeks for larger T's (T. blondi, etc) before moving or startling the animal.

While it is shedding, a slight raise in humidity (bring it to a room next to a hot shower, add droplets of water around the T) is about the only thing you can do.

A bad molt (that results in twisted legs) will most like will result in additional stress that will kill the T.
 

Botar

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Messages
1,442
Originally posted by T. blondi
We've lost so many to that, I was wondering if it's a common thing with T's.

Many of ours got out of their exuvia ok but the next day would be in the corner legs curled underneath. Others would come out of the molt and would move around fine, but then would starve themselfs to death. Which was the saddest part mainly becuase I had to watch their abdomen shrivel up and look like a raisin.

We can't understand it; the room temperature, humidity, food and substrate never changed from the day that they were eating. Their cages are always clean, and their substrate is sterile vermiculite. No sponges for contamination, nothing. We have a P. ornata right now in the other room dieing with it's legs curling underneath it. It's saddened my mother to the point that she thinks it's her fault and doesn't want to expand her collection.
You've left to many variables unanswered to receive much of a response. With what species are you dealing? Temps? Humidity? Could there be outside factors that could be contributing to the mortality? Chemicals? Pesticides? Contaminated foods?

Just some things to think about.

Botar
 

Lycanthrope

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 10, 2002
Messages
624
Many of ours got out of their exuvia ok but the next day would be in the corner legs curled underneath.
on this single case here id suggest dehydration. i found one of my usumbara slings in a death curl after a molt. i prodded him gently, and he moved ever so slightly. in a last ditch effort, i gave a light spritz of water over him. an hour later he was up and webbing. just food for thought.
 

MrT

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 13, 2002
Messages
2,174
Re: Sheds

Originally posted by Midwest Art
Yes sometimes despite all or the right conditions (humidity) , a T may have a bad molt. Some even have a hard time right after molt if the substrate is too humid (M. robustum, C. crawshayi) as they are succeptible to fungal infections.

T's are hardy little animals, one T. blondi 1 incher out of a large batch came in missing 4 legs. It could only crawl around, but it fed, I fed it waxworms. It shed shortly thereafter and regrew all legs and looked completely normal.

Never under any circumstances attempt to "rescue" a T that has a bad molt (legs stuck etc.) As it's book lungs haven't hardened yet, startling the T will surely kill it. It's hard to resist the temptation of rescuing a poor animal but even the best intentions can result in disaster. Always let a T harden up a few days (for spiderlings) to several weeks for larger T's (T. blondi, etc) before moving or startling the animal.

While it is shedding, a slight raise in humidity (bring it to a room next to a hot shower, add droplets of water around the T) is about the only thing you can do.

A bad molt (that results in twisted legs) will most like will result in additional stress that will kill the T.
Art,
Thanks for the great info. I never knew that startling a newly molted T could harm it in such a way as to kill it.
Also, now I'm really worried about my King baboon.
How much is too much humidity?

Ernie
 

T. blondi

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
23
Originally posted by Botar
You've left to many variables unanswered to receive much of a response. With what species are you dealing? Temps? Humidity? Could there be outside factors that could be contributing to the mortality? Chemicals? Pesticides? Contaminated foods?

Just some things to think about.

Botar
Species : P. ornata
Temperature: 75-80 degrees
Humidity : 60% (going by guess work, can't afford to have hygrometers -$15.00's a pop- for all 13 spp.)

Chemicals : no, we get store bought feeders, and use sterile vermiculite as substrate
Pesticides : no (see chemicals)
Contaminated food : Doubt it ... petland has been good about giving us parasite-free crickets before, although they could have internal parasites. Don't know about that one. But we have been feeding our 5yr old A. avic , the same crickets we been giving the dieing ones; and she's five years old, so I'm not sure about that one

Sorry if this isn't much help, and if there are any spelling errors, It's hard for me to think, being up since 08:00 am (01/24), to 2:00am (01/25). Damn Insomnia
 
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