Cedar Hides?

Arachnomaniak

Arachnoangel
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Hey Guys,
I was able to find a bit of info regarding the use as cedar mulch as a substrate and that it isn't a good idea to use for inverts. I have found a place in town that carries "coarse mulch" which is essentially large pieces of what I believe they said was cedar that was anywhere from 3"-7"+.
Would a good size piece of cedar bark have the same effect as cedar mulch? Just wasn't sure if you'd get the same problem with the oils etc if it was just a soild piece rather than ground up and shredded cedar.

Any thoughts on this? Anyone had any success or bad experiences using large pieces of cedar as hides etc?

Thanks in advance!
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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from what i have read other poisonous trees seem to concentrate "insect"icidals in the back. kind of like how our skin is a primary layer of our immune system, i would imagine.


i would say take a pass
 

WyvernsLair

Arachnobaron
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cedar contains a volatile oil in the wood that acts like a natural insecticide... you do NOT want to put it in any cage that has a living animal in it - especially a pet spider or pet bug.
 

Arachnomaniak

Arachnoangel
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Thanks for the suggestions, I figured it might be problematic. I knew never to use it for my reptiles/amphibians but had never tried it with my inverts. Good to know! Man, I wish I had my own mosquito and black fly repellent built into my skin :p
 

Lorgakor

Arachnomom
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If the tree is not alive, chances are it is not toxic any more. I know many people who mix cedar mulch in with their tarantula substrate with zero problems. Dead bark probably will be just fine.

Just so you know, my entire basement is covered in cedar. All the walls are covered in cedar, you know, it's very country lol! But I've never once had a problem with my inverts, nor have all of the native insects that live all over my basement, including the spiders that live in the walls. If it's dead wood, there are no oils left in it. Mind you this is all just my opinion but that's what I have found.
 

Merfolk

Arachnoprince
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What you could try is to soak it, even boil it in doubt, then dry it. Might remove some of this toxic stuff.
 

jw73

Arachnobaron
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Don't use cedar and pine wood. They don't like it.
 

WyvernsLair

Arachnobaron
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If the tree is not alive, chances are it is not toxic any more. I know many people who mix cedar mulch in with their tarantula substrate with zero problems. Dead bark probably will be just fine.

Just so you know, my entire basement is covered in cedar. All the walls are covered in cedar, you know, it's very country lol! But I've never once had a problem with my inverts, nor have all of the native insects that live all over my basement, including the spiders that live in the walls. If it's dead wood, there are no oils left in it. Mind you this is all just my opinion but that's what I have found.

Dead wood had nothing to do with whether cedar is going to be a problem or not. It has to do with the volatile oils it contains. Cedar takes quite a bit of time for the oil's to leech out of the wood naturally. I'm betting you didn't move into the house when it had fresh cut cedar for walls.... they are probably years old. If you can "smell" the cedar smell, then the wood still contains the volatile oils.

Pine also contains volatile oils that can cause similar problems like cedar does. However, due to the sap/pitch content of the wood, it's usually kiln dried before it's used for beddings and such making it a safer product than cedar as nearly all of the volatile oils in the pine have been burned off in kiln drying process before it ever goes to market.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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Dead wood had nothing to do with whether cedar is going to be a problem or not. It has to do with the volatile oils it contains. Cedar takes quite a bit of time for the oil's to leech out of the wood naturally. I'm betting you didn't move into the house when it had fresh cut cedar for walls.... they are probably years old. If you can "smell" the cedar smell, then the wood still contains the volatile oils.

Pine also contains volatile oils that can cause similar problems like cedar does. However, due to the sap/pitch content of the wood, it's usually kiln dried before it's used for beddings and such making it a safer product than cedar as nearly all of the volatile oils in the pine have been burned off in kiln drying process before it ever goes to market.
so my rough rule of it it smells strong don't use it is decent?

and by the way, i most certainly do not stand behind the like, negative corollary (if it doesn't smell strong you can use it)!

i mean, if i see a picture of a tree i might now whether it is cedar/pine family... but maybe not... when it is mulched no way. so i say, if it smells strong (which to me basically means i can smell it at all beyond trace amounts) don't use it. heh.
 

Lorgakor

Arachnomom
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Dead wood had nothing to do with whether cedar is going to be a problem or not. It has to do with the volatile oils it contains. Cedar takes quite a bit of time for the oil's to leech out of the wood naturally. I'm betting you didn't move into the house when it had fresh cut cedar for walls.... they are probably years old. If you can "smell" the cedar smell, then the wood still contains the volatile oils.

Pine also contains volatile oils that can cause similar problems like cedar does. However, due to the sap/pitch content of the wood, it's usually kiln dried before it's used for beddings and such making it a safer product than cedar as nearly all of the volatile oils in the pine have been burned off in kiln drying process before it ever goes to market.
My parents built this house, when we they first put the cedar up it did have a slight smell, but the house spiders and other species living down here didn't seem bothered by it. It doesn't have any odour any more though.
 
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