Cavedweller's Basic Millipede Caresheet

7Fin

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 22, 2017
Messages
164
Wait, so I shouldn't use a heat mat? My house gets pretty cold in the winter, can I use it then? I know they are dangerous if you put them at the bottom of the tank though >w>
 

Ruvaaa

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
4
I NEED HELP!!!!! I ACCIDENTALLY DROPPED MY MILLIPEDE!!!!! SHE WAS ON MY HAND AND I WAS OUTSIDE AND SHE FELL OFF ONTO THE CEMENT SHE STARTED LEAKING FLUID FROM THE TOP PART OF HER TAIL AND ALSO HER HEAD HAS A LITTLE FLUID COMING ON TOP AS WELL NOT ALL JUST A TINY BIT! I'M FREAKING OUT IT'S MY FIRST TIME OWNING A MILLIPEDE AND I'M FRANTIC! IS SHE GOING TO BE OKAY? WHAT DOES THE FLUID MEAN. I'VE TRIED LOOKING IT UP BUT NOT A LOT OF INFO POPS UP. HELP PLEASEEE.!!!!!
 

terribletrexx

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
10
Thanks for the care sheet it helped keep millipedes alive one died because of Eucalyptus leaves in the terrarium it saved the other one.
 

terribletrexx

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
10
I NEED HELP!!!!! I ACCIDENTALLY DROPPED MY MILLIPEDE!!!!! SHE WAS ON MY HAND AND I WAS OUTSIDE AND SHE FELL OFF ONTO THE CEMENT SHE STARTED LEAKING FLUID FROM THE TOP PART OF HER TAIL AND ALSO HER HEAD HAS A LITTLE FLUID COMING ON TOP AS WELL NOT ALL JUST A TINY BIT! I'M FREAKING OUT IT'S MY FIRST TIME OWNING A MILLIPEDE AND I'M FRANTIC! IS SHE GOING TO BE OKAY? WHAT DOES THE FLUID MEAN. I'VE TRIED LOOKING IT UP BUT NOT A LOT OF INFO POPS UP. HELP PLEASEEE.!!!!!
Maybe try to stop up the wound with something.
 

maxpede

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 7, 2018
Messages
11
Cavedweller’s Millipede Basics
Care tips are generalized and may vary by species.
Last updated 05-21-14

Introduction: Millipedes are slow moving, peaceful detritivores, organisms that eat dead plant matter and turn it into soil. They are not insects, but rather of the class Diplopoda. Millipedes share the subphylum Myriapoda and a similar shape with the fast, predatory centipede, but have little else in common.

Millipedes As Pets: They are not the pet for everyone. They don’t like being handled too often. They spend most of their time underground, and usually emerge at night. However, they are quiet, don’t need much space, and are very cheap and easy to care for. Millipedes can be housed together in groups, and come in a variety of colors. Some species can live a decade or more.

Diet: Rotten leaves and rotten wood. “Treats” can be offered once or twice a week (dog kibble, cucumber, melon, apple, mushroom, carrot, ect). Fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed and pesticide-free. Uneaten treats should be removed within a day or two. No water bowl is needed, millipedes get moisture from the substrate.

Substrate: 50% dead leaves and crumbled rotten hardwood (oak, aspen, maple, ect), 50% coconut husk bedding. Add an additional inch or two of dead leaves on top of the substrate. Never use conifers or aromatic plants such as pine, cedar, or eucalyptus, as they contain toxic resin. As the old substrate is eaten and converted to waste, add more leaves/wood. Replace with fresh substrate once or twice a year. Chemical-free hardwood sawdust or aspen shaving pet bedding can be mixed into the substrate as an additional food source, but will take some time to decompose.

Enclosure: The enclosure should be twice as long as the biggest millipede. Substrate should be at least as deep as the length of the biggest millipede. Millipedes can be kept in plastic tubs with airholes in the lid (make sure the holes aren’t big enough for the millipedes to escape). Millipedes don’t need cage decorations as they spend most of their time underground.

Environment: Room temperature (69 to 78°F/21 to 25°C). Heat pads/lamps are dangerous for millipedes. Keep the substrate moist and mist every few days as the top layer of substrate dries out.

Handling: Always your wash hands before and after handling. Don’t handle millipedes too often to avoid excessive stress. Millipedes will coil up when frightened, but can also secrete a foul-tasting poison to deter predators. This substance may stain the skin but isn’t dangerous to humans (barring an allergic reaction). Wash it off immediately and keep it out of your eyes and mouth.

Sexing: A male millipede is missing the legs on his 7th segment, instead possessing reproductive organs here. A female has normal legs on the 7th segment.

In some species, such as Narceus americanus and Chicobolus spingerus, the male's 7th segment is also noticeably enlarged.

Life Cycle: Some millipede species breed readily in captivity. The egg capsules often look like fecal pellets, so be careful throwing out waste. Newly hatched young emerge tiny and colorless, and some species take years to mature. In addition to the typical diet, the young also feed on the adult’s waste to obtain necessary gut bacteria.

Molting: Millipedes grow by periodically shedding their exoskeleton. This is usually done underground and may take several weeks, so don’t worry if your millipede retreats underground for an extended period. Do not disturb your millipede during this time.

Mites: Millipede enclosures can host a variety of mites, some beneficial and some not. Larger mites that travel over the millipede’s body or wander the substrate are usually helpful, helping to keep the host and enclosure clean. However, one must watch out for the dangerous grain mite. These tiny, white, slow-moving mites can cover a millipede and infest its enclosure if supplementary food is left in too long or the leaves/wood provided are too fresh. Grain mites can be controlled by replacing the substrate and withholding supplementary food such as fruit. A heavy infestation of grain mites can be managed by introducing the predatory mite Hypoaspis miles (available for purchase at gardening websites). Parasitic mites are rare in captivity and not covered in the scope of this caresheet.

Further reading/Sources:
Millipedes in Captivity by Orin McMonigle
petmillipede.weebly.com

---------- Post added 05-21-2014 at 09:10 PM ----------

Here's the caresheet, if you guys have any corrections or suggestions for stuff to add please let me know! I've also made a version for print but I'm not sure where to host a PDF file for sharing, you know where I can do that?
Straight to point
Cavedweller’s Millipede Basics
Care tips are generalized and may vary by species.
Last updated 05-21-14

Introduction: Millipedes are slow moving, peaceful detritivores, organisms that eat dead plant matter and turn it into soil. They are not insects, but rather of the class Diplopoda. Millipedes share the subphylum Myriapoda and a similar shape with the fast, predatory centipede, but have little else in common.

Millipedes As Pets: They are not the pet for everyone. They don’t like being handled too often. They spend most of their time underground, and usually emerge at night. However, they are quiet, don’t need much space, and are very cheap and easy to care for. Millipedes can be housed together in groups, and come in a variety of colors. Some species can live a decade or more.

Diet: Rotten leaves and rotten wood. “Treats” can be offered once or twice a week (dog kibble, cucumber, melon, apple, mushroom, carrot, ect). Fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed and pesticide-free. Uneaten treats should be removed within a day or two. No water bowl is needed, millipedes get moisture from the substrate.

Substrate: 50% dead leaves and crumbled rotten hardwood (oak, aspen, maple, ect), 50% coconut husk bedding. Add an additional inch or two of dead leaves on top of the substrate. Never use conifers or aromatic plants such as pine, cedar, or eucalyptus, as they contain toxic resin. As the old substrate is eaten and converted to waste, add more leaves/wood. Replace with fresh substrate once or twice a year. Chemical-free hardwood sawdust or aspen shaving pet bedding can be mixed into the substrate as an additional food source, but will take some time to decompose.

Enclosure: The enclosure should be twice as long as the biggest millipede. Substrate should be at least as deep as the length of the biggest millipede. Millipedes can be kept in plastic tubs with airholes in the lid (make sure the holes aren’t big enough for the millipedes to escape). Millipedes don’t need cage decorations as they spend most of their time underground.

Environment: Room temperature (69 to 78°F/21 to 25°C). Heat pads/lamps are dangerous for millipedes. Keep the substrate moist and mist every few days as the top layer of substrate dries out.

Handling: Always your wash hands before and after handling. Don’t handle millipedes too often to avoid excessive stress. Millipedes will coil up when frightened, but can also secrete a foul-tasting poison to deter predators. This substance may stain the skin but isn’t dangerous to humans (barring an allergic reaction). Wash it off immediately and keep it out of your eyes and mouth.

Sexing: A male millipede is missing the legs on his 7th segment, instead possessing reproductive organs here. A female has normal legs on the 7th segment.

In some species, such as Narceus americanus and Chicobolus spingerus, the male's 7th segment is also noticeably enlarged.

Life Cycle: Some millipede species breed readily in captivity. The egg capsules often look like fecal pellets, so be careful throwing out waste. Newly hatched young emerge tiny and colorless, and some species take years to mature. In addition to the typical diet, the young also feed on the adult’s waste to obtain necessary gut bacteria.

Molting: Millipedes grow by periodically shedding their exoskeleton. This is usually done underground and may take several weeks, so don’t worry if your millipede retreats underground for an extended period. Do not disturb your millipede during this time.

Mites: Millipede enclosures can host a variety of mites, some beneficial and some not. Larger mites that travel over the millipede’s body or wander the substrate are usually helpful, helping to keep the host and enclosure clean. However, one must watch out for the dangerous grain mite. These tiny, white, slow-moving mites can cover a millipede and infest its enclosure if supplementary food is left in too long or the leaves/wood provided are too fresh. Grain mites can be controlled by replacing the substrate and withholding supplementary food such as fruit. A heavy infestation of grain mites can be managed by introducing the predatory mite Hypoaspis miles (available for purchase at gardening websites). Parasitic mites are rare in captivity and not covered in the scope of this caresheet.

Further reading/Sources:
Millipedes in Captivity by Orin McMonigle
petmillipede.weebly.com

---------- Post added 05-21-2014 at 09:10 PM ----------

Here's the caresheet, if you guys have any corrections or suggestions for stuff to add please let me know! I've also made a version for print but I'm not sure where to host a PDF file for sharing, you know where I can do that?
Short sweet and do the point. Awesome
 

Luc

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2019
Messages
5
Wait, heat lamps and pads are dangerous? Is there any other way to keep my millipedes warm? Because our room temp is 18*C!
 

anders2001

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
27
Wait, heat lamps and pads are dangerous? Is there any other way to keep my millipedes warm? Because our room temp is 18*C!
headmats are okay. but place them on the side of the tank. Not under the tank. Millipedes start digging when its to hot. If the heat mat is under the ground they will stay digging while its to hot.

I got a question as well. Why do you recommend feeding only once a week with treats? I do it daily and it seems to work.
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
2,251
Wait, heat lamps and pads are dangerous? Is there any other way to keep my millipedes warm? Because our room temp is 18*C!
headmats are okay. but place them on the side of the tank. Not under the tank. Millipedes start digging when its to hot. If the heat mat is under the ground they will stay digging while its to hot.

I got a question as well. Why do you recommend feeding only once a week with treats? I do it daily and it seems to work.
I think I can field these questions since they relate to husbandry suggestions in https://www.amazon.com/Millipeds-Captivity-Diplopodan-Husbandry-Reproductive/dp/1616461438

1. Heat mats and lights normally cause point of contact or pinpoint heat radiation resulting in moisture stratification that can harm or kill adults of most species over time and immatures quickly. Use a space heater and pay attention to the placement (height and proximity to vents or cold walls) if your home is 18C/64F. Consider getting a thermometer. There are many different temperatures in a structure that is "18C."

2. Feeding daily will result in mite and other pest problems unless you are fully removing uneaten food every day.
 

MillipedeTrain

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
51
A good care sheet but my only complaint is the coconut Fibre. I would never recommend anyone to use it if they enjoy their millipedes being alive. Coconut fibre in my personal experience kills millipedes. I hate the stuff. Especially never keep baby millipedes on it either.
 
Top