Can anyone ID these two spiders?

Bunyan van Asten

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
265
Hey everyone! I'm pretty hyped because i found 2 wolf spiders (although i'm not sure about the second one).
I found them in a forrest right beside a tree.
1. 14887108062712129419495.jpg I would like however to know what species this is in particular, if you need better pictures, i'm able to make those later tonight.
2. 1488710918194542393978.jpg
Any tips on how to care for them are appreciatet too!
(These are temporary enclosures!!!!!!!!!)
 

9darlingcalvi

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 6, 2016
Messages
112
The first one looks like the one I just caught today, it was 30 yesterday and 45 right now. Guess it's spring time for spiders today
 

Toff202

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 10, 2016
Messages
201
The second is a Pisaura (maybe Pisaurina) species. The first one I don't know, maybe Pardosa spec.?
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
Hey everyone! I'm pretty hyped because i found 2 wolf spiders (although i'm not sure about the second one).
The first one is a wolf spider, likely belonging to the genus Pardosa.

The second one is a nursery web spider (Pisaura mirabilis). It looks a little plump, possibly gravid (pregnant).


Any tips on how to care for them are appreciatet too!
Wolf spiders should be set up terrestrially. You should provide a hide, a water dish, and substrate. (Some wolf spiders like to burrow; others do not.) Decorations like leaf litter and moss might help it feel more secure.

Nursery web spiders prefer wet environments but can live in other habitats. In addition to the above recommendations for wolf spiders, you will want to provide climbing objects where they can set up an ambush.
 

Bunyan van Asten

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
265
The first one is a wolf spider, likely belonging to the genus Pardosa.

The second one is a nursery web spider (Pisaura mirabilis). It looks a little plump, possibly gravid (pregnant).




Wolf spiders should be set up terrestrially. You should provide a hide, a water dish, and substrate. (Some wolf spiders like to burrow; others do not.) Decorations like leaf litter and moss might help it feel more secure.

Nursery web spiders prefer wet environments but can live in other habitats. In addition to the above recommendations for wolf spiders, you will want to provide climbing objects where they can set up an ambush.
Alright, i'll begin a soon as possible, thanks for the help!
 

Bunyan van Asten

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
265
The Pisura mirabilis molted last night and now has really fat pedipalps, does that mean it's actually a male? 20170315_100817.jpg
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
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Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
The Pisura mirabilis molted last night and now has really fat pedipalps, does that mean it's actually a male?]
It's a boy!

Juveniles and females have slender palps. Males in the final (and sometimes even the penultimate) instar have palpal bulbs that look like little boxing gloves. (During the penultimate instar, you may see swollen palpal bulbs on some male spiders, but they are not yet sclerotized and will look translucent.)

Unless you have plans to breed him, I'd release a mature male back outside where he can find a mate and fulfill his life's purpose.
 
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1Lord Of Ants1

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 9, 2010
Messages
312
A little tip for catching wolf spiders - head to the nearest likely habitat such as a small clearing near the woods, a grassy patch, etc., equipped with a bright flashlight or headlamp. Go on a dry night to avoid interfering dew, and simply turn on your headlamp or hold your flashlight to the side of your head at eye level. Sweep the light around and follow the lights. Wolf spiders posses tapeta and as such produce an eye shine. In prime areas the ground lights up like the night sky. You can find some pretty big spiders by following the largest sets of eyes glowing back at you.
 
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