Caiman Lizards, Dracaena guianesis

Philth

N.Y.H.C.
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Has anybody here ever successfully kept one. If so can you share your experience. I've heard of little success in keeping them I've heard of problems with parasite's in there blood that's hard to treat. Anybody here have experience this or keep one?

Later, Tom
 

tikbalang

Arachnoknight
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i've heard of locals that keep those lizards. but not able to see them personally, i heard its not easy to take care.
 

VinceG

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From what I've heard, they are quite difficult to take care of, on of the main reason is that they would only feed on snails, which can be quite difficult to find. They are one of the most impressing lizard IMO though.
 

Jmugleston

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We're setting a cage up for a group of these. If purchased from a reliable source they are not supposed to be too bad. No unusual issues past your run of the mill imported reptile parasite possibilities. Nothing a trip to a vets office can't handle.
Though they prefer snails, most I have talked to have been able to get them to switch to a high quality cat food. Care seems to be similar to Shin's crocodile lizards (Shinisaurus crocodilurus) except the teids like it a bit warmer. For ours we're preparing a large cage (4X8 footprint) with a pond taking up about half that with branches adding climbing space.
 

VinceG

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We're setting a cage up for a group of these. If purchased from a reliable source they are not supposed to be too bad. No unusual issues past your run of the mill imported reptile parasite possibilities. Nothing a trip to a vets office can't handle.
Though they prefer snails, most I have talked to have been able to get them to switch to a high quality cat food. Care seems to be similar to Shin's crocodile lizards (Shinisaurus crocodilurus) except the teids like it a bit warmer. For ours we're preparing a large cage (4X8 footprint) with a pond taking up about half that with branches adding climbing space.
Interresting, keep us updated about your project!
 

Dyn

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I was actually looking into them recently. The hardest part seems to be their diet. I think its zoomed that actually came out with a Can-o-Snails food that I heard they will eat. I'll have to find the care sheet i was looking at before.
 

arachnidsrulz12

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my uncle has one of those caiman lizard and he also has a caiman iguana

I saw it and it look awesome
 

Jmugleston

Arachnoprince
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I was actually looking into them recently. The hardest part seems to be their diet. I think its zoomed that actually came out with a Can-o-Snails food that I heard they will eat. I'll have to find the care sheet i was looking at before.
They would go through a ton of those cans in a sitting (at least once grown). Apple snails aren't too hard to raise, but canned dog or cat food are much easier to obtain....and cheaper.
 

Dyn

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It was only a part of their diet and being mixed with some other stuff being dog or cat food it could get them to eat it more readily than without.

I think I remember reading they need some hard food to help grind their teeth down? This was along time go. It was the reason you give them crayfish and snails with shells or something. I could be completely wrong though.
 

Jmugleston

Arachnoprince
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It was only a part of their diet and being mixed with some other stuff being dog or cat food it could get them to eat it more readily than without.

I think I remember reading they need some hard food to help grind their teeth down? This was along time go. It was the reason you give them crayfish and snails with shells or something. I could be completely wrong though.
Eating tougher food is probably a benefit to the overall skull musculature and the bone development more than it is beneficial for their teeth. So either way it wouldn't be a bad idea to supplement the diet.
 

Dyn

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I cant seem to find any information on it so apparently im just crazy. Was just something I thought I remembered reading.
 

Philth

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Thanks for the input. I work for a veterinary office that specializes in exotics. We are considering this sp. for an office "pet". The animal will have a top notch set up with all the husbandry requirements met.

With that said, all the ones my office has seen over the years were heavily loaded with parasites, that were stubborn to get rid off...flukes ect. Most of the animals were stressed , didn't do well and eventually died.

My friend who owns a small reptile zoo here, has never been able to keep them alive for more than 2 years. I understand that some of the parasite problem comes from the diet. With all the sick ones I've seen over the years , I'm wondering if anybody has had long term success with them? For sure there are plenty of youtube video's that show ones that appear to be healthy, but I've never seen one :rolleyes:haha.

Is anybody in the U.S. captive breeding them or is it safe to assume that any small wild caught animal is just tagged as "CB"?

Later, Tom
 

Matt K

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Most of the parasites they get are from the snails they eat, ironically, if the snails are wild caught. This is easily overcome by culturing your own snails, which is very easy to do with Helix aspersa which grow like weeds in the USA. Cultured snails will ensure parasite-free food items. I often have surplus in the late spring / early summer that I sell to some gecko keepers and Abronia keepers.
 

dtknow

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Matt: If you could start another thread on snail culture it'd be much appreciated.
 

tikbalang

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out of this world idea (sorry).. there's a probability that the parasites are part of their system, and removing them is leathal. or not actually removing them, but the by means that their diets don't have to produce this parasites is also leathal.
 

H. laoticus

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I was lucky enough to see these guys in person at Prehistoric Pets in Fountain Valley, CA just a few months ago.

Here are 2 pics I found from The Reptile Zoo's facebook page (you'll need an account to see them):
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=432428427499&set=a.102839682499.91588.101389252499

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=438241422499&set=a.102839682499.91588.101389252499

Jay, the owner, is a busy guy, but maybe you can contact him or one of his staff members to ask about them. Their site is prehistoricpets.com
 
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