Caeparia

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
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Feb 26, 2017
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486
In browsing the Internet looking for information about Deropeltis sp. "Jinka," I came across this website: http://cockroach.speciesfile.org/HomePage/Cockroach/HomePage.aspx. In the bottom right corner, you can see what appears to be a photo or painting of Caeparia sp. I can't seem to find any information about this species in English, but it looks beautiful. Does anybody know anything about it?
I also can't find any photos of it other than the one on this website.
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
Active Member
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Apr 18, 2015
Messages
2,274
In browsing the Internet looking for information about Deropeltis sp. "Jinka," I came across this website: http://cockroach.speciesfile.org/HomePage/Cockroach/HomePage.aspx. In the bottom right corner, you can see what appears to be a photo or painting of Caeparia sp. I can't seem to find any information about this species in English, but it looks beautiful. Does anybody know anything about it?
I also can't find any photos of it other than the one on this website.
Yeah, that genus is very nice, very closely related to Panesthia, and unfortunately none are in the hobby yet. :( If you look here, there are images for both Caeparia donskoffi and C.saussurei, just click on their names.

I assume they would have a diet of rotten hardwood, and would probably eat little else. Like Panesthia they are probably sensitive to high temperatures, take a few years to reach adulthood, don't produce a whole lot of offspring, etc.
 

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 26, 2017
Messages
486
Yeah, that genus is very nice, very closely related to Panesthia, and unfortunately none are in the hobby yet. :( If you look here, there are images for both Caeparia donskoffi and C.saussurei, just click on their names.

I assume they would have a diet of rotten hardwood, and would probably eat little else. Like Panesthia they are probably sensitive to high temperatures, take a few years to reach adulthood, don't produce a whole lot of offspring, etc.
Wow, they're absolutely beautiful. I would even take one of these over a Macropanesthia rhinoceros. They seem to be located mainly in Southeast Asia, which is not a very convenient place for capturing, though, so I doubt they'll be in the hobby (at least anytime soon).
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
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Wow, they're absolutely beautiful. I would even take one of these over a Macropanesthia rhinoceros. They seem to be located mainly in Southeast Asia, which is not a very convenient place for capturing, though, so I doubt they'll be in the hobby (at least anytime soon).
Yeah, we don't really get any imports from that area, at least not roach imports, they may find their way into the European hobby one day though, and then from there, get smuggled into the US. :)
 

VolkswagenBug

Arachnobaron
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Feb 26, 2017
Messages
486
Yeah, we don't really get any imports from that area, at least not roach imports, they may find their way into the European hobby one day though, and then from there, get smuggled into the US. :)
Legally, I would hope.
I eventually want to move to Europe, it seems to be far easier to get the more rare arthropods there than in the US. Just look at any European invert shop website vs an American one.
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
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Legally, I would hope.
I eventually want to move to Europe, it seems to be far easier to get the more rare arthropods there than in the US. Just look at any European invert shop website vs an American one.
Unfortunately, that's not how most species find their way over here, a good chunk of the roaches in the US hobby now were smuggled in, and then established in collections here.

Yeah, European keepers have access to a lot more cool species than we do for sure, since importing there is legal, and a common occurrence.
 
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