C.cyaneopubescens- Recently molted, just found in death curl

scorpionchaos

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Oct 15, 2012
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Hey guys

I know I vanished from these forums but I never stopped keeping T's- I don't really have any good excuses for my absence and I also can't guarantee I'm going to be back on here with any regularity but I will try!

Last week my C.cyaneopubescens molted and she came out great! Also I learnt from the molt that its a She (as mentioned before)! I board in residence at school and come home on the weekends, I saw her fangs where red and not black so I held off on feeding her but I did spray half the bin and topped up here bottle cap water dish. I just got home tonight and was going through all the bins when I saw her in a death curl. The bin didn't smell bad- nor does she so she is either very recently dead or just dehydrated. I really don't understand what happened- I was only gone for 4 days and she and although the dish appeared to have dried up in that time the moisture from the spraying didn't. I've refilled her water bowl and draped her fangs into it and the abdomen is out of the water and dry but looks quite shrivelled and deflated. I currently plan on removing her from the water dish in 20 minutes or so and checking back in on her in the morning. I haven't been able to see any movement but when she was in the palm of my hand as I looked her over I did feel what appeared to be fang movement but that could easily be my wishful imagination. The room temps stays in the mid to high 70's and no other tarantulas of mine are looking like her- even an LP that molted very near the same she did and has received the exact same treatment is totally fine.

Any advice or info on how to help her or what may have caused this to prevent from happening in the future would be much appreciated. Heres a photo of her the day after the molt and now as I have her set up.

 

Ghost56

Arachnobaron
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Is the second pic the way you found her or is that after you set her mouth in the water bowl? It looks empty so I'm assuming that's the way you found her.? And from what I see she looked skinny already in the first pic, and her abdomen looks almost non-existent in the second pic. Not sure if it's the angle or not.
 

scorpionchaos

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Is the second pic the way you found her or is that after you set her mouth in the water bowl? It looks empty so I'm assuming that's the way you found her.?
That the picture after I set her up- It doesn't look like there is water in there but there is an it is in contact with her fangs/mouth. I should have taken a photo of how I found her but I panicked. she was about 2 inches away from her water bowl facing away from it (actually in the exact position I saw her in- its as if she just stayed completely still the entire time I was gone and started deteriorate (although it could be a coincidence).
 

Ghost56

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That the picture after I set her up- It doesn't look like there is water in there but there is an it is in contact with her fangs/mouth. I should have taken a photo of how I found her but I panicked. she was about 2 inches away from her water bowl facing away from it (actually in the exact position I saw her in- its as if she just stayed completely still the entire time I was gone and started deteriorate (although it could be a coincidence).
I'm still pretty new to the hobby so take this with a grain of salt, but you could probably flip her over and drip some water on her mouth. I'm with cold blood though tbh, looks pretty bad, but I guess it's worth a shot since you think you felt movement.
 
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cold blood

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I just re read and saw that the misting had not dried in a few days (never mist a GBB enclosure). This is a bad sign. First, its a sign of inadequate ventilation, which for an arid terrestrial isn't always a big deal really, but add water, and its bad, and for a spider like a GBB that's basically intolerant of moisture, it could be fatal.

It doesn't really matter the species, condensation on the walls is pretty much always a bad sign.
 

Ghost56

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I just re read and saw that the misting had not dried in a few days (never mist a GBB enclosure). This is a bad sign. First, its a sign of inadequate ventilation, which for an arid terrestrial isn't always a big deal really, but add water, and its bad, and for a spider like a GBB that's basically intolerant of moisture, it could be fatal.

It doesn't really matter the species, condensation on the walls is pretty much always a bad sign.
If per say she was dehydrated, would my above advice be worth a shot or would that be a bad idea still?
 

cold blood

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If per say she was dehydrated, would my above advice be worth a shot or would that be a bad idea still?
flip it in its back and leave a drop of water at the base of the fangs.

I would not put an arid species in an ICU or on damp anything.
 

Ghost56

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flip it in its back and leave a drop of water at the base of the fangs.

I would not put an arid species in an ICU or on damp anything.
Alright thanks! I'll edit my post above, I don't want to steer anyone in the wrong direction.
 

scorpionchaos

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I just re read and saw that the misting had not dried in a few days (never mist a GBB enclosure). This is a bad sign. First, its a sign of inadequate ventilation, which for an arid terrestrial isn't always a big deal really, but add water, and its bad, and for a spider like a GBB that's basically intolerant of moisture, it could be fatal.

It doesn't really matter the species, condensation on the walls is pretty much always a bad sign.
Hey Coldblood, its been a while- I wish it was under better circumstances. I guess a novice is a novice- I always spray about 1/4 of the enclosure of all my T's before I go an never had a problem until now. Although it does't make a huge difference that wasn't dried condensation in the photo, it was just dried water after being sprayed there (the sides dry out within the day) but that doesn't really change anything as I was still adding moisture. I guess thats hard lesson learned. I find it strange she made it this far if that the case but I guess thats just a testament to how hardy they can be. She was just molting into her adult colours, I was really looking forward to watching her grow (I was lucky enough to grow her from 1/3. I was so excited when I found out she was female last week, I was overjoyed I would have her around for a while longer. Not the first time my arrogance has caused the death of a T but as always I hope it will be the last and I sure won't loose another for the same reason.

I'll do as you and ghost suggested and I'll pull out the dirt that has yet to dry incase it helps any but I'm pretty sure you both are right- she has likely been gone for some time now.
 

cold blood

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I was only gone for 4 days and she and although the dish appeared to have dried up in that time the moisture from the spraying didn't.
I didn't see moisture, I was referring to this. Moisture that remains for 4 days could put an arid t in a critical situation in short order.

Good to see ya back around.:) although yes, the circumstances suck.
 

Python

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A loss is always a hard thing to take. Sorry for your probable loss. I'm afraid I have to agree with the others. Your T appears to have been gone for quite some time. It does look dehydrated in the first pic too although it's possible there was something else going on to make it look so emaciated. It might be best to put it in the freezer to make sure. I've never seen one in that condition survive. Not saying it couldn't, I just don't think it could survive, if it's even alive. Once again, my condolences on your loss.
 

KezyGLA

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That second pic looks real bad. I would agree that its dead already. If its alive it probably wont be for much longer.

The first photo the abdomen was on the small side. Dehydration seems to be the factor that caused the death. Although these species can die if humidity too high. Maybe a bigger water dish and sub kept dry would have helped. And droplets of water on webbing instead of misting. As CB said, misting is not for GBBs. They are arid species

I absolutely love these Ts and I am very sorry to have read this thread.

Sorry for your loss :(
 
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