C Crawshayi Advise

AubZ

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 19, 2007
Messages
1,125
Hi everyone,
I was just wondering if I could get the help of some experienced keepers of this T. I would like to know the following please :

1.) How long have you been keeping King Baboon's?
2.) Have you ever been bitten by your King?
3.) What do you feed him or her & how often?
4.) What is your personal opinion of this T?

Thanks for the help.
 

beetleman

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
2,872
been keeping them for years,never been bit by an adult, but a juvie yes it hurt but not for long.all around excellent spider!:clap: mine are fed crickets which they relish:drool: they are diggers,love to stay in their burrows all the time,they come out here and there. i have adults(2),1 was raised as a spiderling i just sold my other 2 adults:) had 4 definitly a must have.
 

G. pulchra

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
595
1.) How long have you been keeping King Baboon's?
***About 6 years
2.) Have you ever been bitten by your King?
***Never bitten by any T
3.) What do you feed him or her & how often?
***Large crickets, twice a week
4.) What is your personal opinion of this T?
***If you like them large and nasty then it's a good T. I have mine in a 10 gallon enclosure with about 6 inches of substrate so I don't see her very often.
 

Cirith Ungol

Ministry of Fluffy Bunnies
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
3,889
1 over two years (can't remember when I got it)
2 nope. never tried petting it
3 nope. it has closed itself up for 9 months now (is still alive and perky though, i can see it through the sides of the container)
4 It's a cool T, though a tad reclusive (who could have guessed I'd say that? ;))
 

pancho64

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
43
sorry to hijack the thread but could one keep a mf c. crawshayi in a 5.5 gallon tank with 6in of substrate or is that too small? i think they measure (16"L X 8"W X 10"T)
 

Alice

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 29, 2006
Messages
976
sure you can - ts survive in tiny cages. if you should is an entirely different point. for a t that gets that large and loves to build extensive burrows, i'd certainly use a 10 gallon.
 

Becky

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
642
1.) How long have you been keeping King Baboon's?

About a year

2.) Have you ever been bitten by your King?

Nah.. she had a gd go when i rehoused her though! lol

3.) What do you feed him or her & how often?
Mine had about 4 locusts a week. She was very skinny when i got her, so i fed her up.

4.) What is your personal opinion of this T?

I think these are awesome T's. My girl was about 8.5" legspan. She was in a big 10 gallon tank, with about 11" of substrate. These species in the wild burrow down about a metre. As long as they have plenty to burrow in they'll be fine!
Unfortunately my girl moulted, then died 2 months later :( Don't know why... just found her curled up in her burrow one morning. Could of been however old though as i bought her as an adult.
Have a little spiderling now. 1cm, and hes in a tall plastic container with 5" of subby and hes burrowed right to the bottom :D
 

AubZ

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 19, 2007
Messages
1,125
Thanks everyone. I have a small King at the moment. About 1in max i think. I got it as one of my first T's & used the theory of when it's bigger I will have enough experience to deal with it. I heard that they are very aggro. that's why I wanted your personal opinions. Thanks Alot. I think I will be rehousing mine soon though, as I only have about 1in of subby. He/she hasn't burrowed all the way down though.

Any other tips on these awesome T's is welcome.
 

treeweta

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 15, 2006
Messages
362
easily one of the most impressive tarantulas, a large old specimen makes a lot of noise, is rather intimidating and looks fantastic even close to a moult, there is genetic variation in the size of the rear legs but some old ones have massive legs, very striking.
 

julesaussies

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 15, 2007
Messages
577
there is genetic variation in the size of the rear legs but some old ones have massive legs, very striking.
i had read that it is simply the females that have the massive rear legs - is there more to it than that? How would one know if they had the genetic variation with the big legs - is there any way to tell before they get that huge or is this a special variation like some of the T's with different color variations (like red factored G. rosea or blue factored A. seemanni)??
 
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