Bumba Cabocla not eating

JayEx3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
14
I got my Bumba Cabocla sling on June 1st. The seller has said that it was feeding off of b lateralis. Yesterday, June 8th, I attempted to feed it for the first time, and it seemed to be scared of the roach. I also tried feeding it dead lateralis and a dead dubia, it won't even go near them. The picture was taken right after I got it.
 

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Tittle13

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
6
That little one will likely give you a molt soon! Pretty dark patch on the abdomen. I don't know how how large the roaches were also but the only other thing would be too large of roaches. I had one of my slings 1/4 a. Genic slings running from a just slightly too large pinhead when I got it. Quickly decided to kill the thing and just left it for the spider to scavenge. Though has since gotten bolder and now taking live. I also received a bumba cabocla about the same size and it has been one of my best eaters. Always ready at the edge of its burrow for a meal. I would try leaving a pre killed in there for a night or two if its hungry it'll find it and make sure it has access to some water too.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Smaller prey items are best suited for spiderlings of that size. I would only feed it a prey item thats size matches the body length of your T.
 

Tittle13

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
6
Also just looked at the pic again and is that white spot at the bottom the dubia that was fed? It is wayyyyy to big if so. Definitely could be your issue. Not sure the size of the b. Lateralis but prey really should be too much bigger that the carapace of the spider or carapace and abdomen. Especially a quick roach like that could look like a huge threat to the little one. You could try chopping a piece off of a roach or putting a leg in there if you have no smaller prey options
 

Tomoran

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Messages
239
Awesome species. :)

I have three of these guys, and they are all great eaters. The only time mine don't eat is when they are in premolt. That said, the size of the dubia in there is a bit large, even if it's dead, and I have have some tarantulas that don't seem to go for them. It's also worth noting that even if a sling that size did feed on a much larger prey item, it wouldn't consume the entire thing and it could be difficult to tell if it ate at all.

It sounds like you tried feeding it a few different things yesterday when it didn't show interest at the first. It could have been bit spooked by the constant activity and therefore didn't eat. With dead prey, they often don't jump right on them. They'll wander out at night when it's dark and they feel more secure and find the pre-killed prey. I would drop part of a cricket in let or cut off a piece of roach and leave it in their overnight and see if it has been moved in the morning. If it doesn't eat, then it could be in premolt. When slings, my guys would usually get a bit more plump than that (and that dark spot is hairs) when they were in premolt, so yours may still eat.
 

Richard Stewart

the_tarantula_collective
Joined
Oct 3, 2016
Messages
5
I also have a B. cabocla that is just over 1/2". I feed it small pieces of a freshly killed small cricket or a small cut off piece of a mealworm. Like was previously mentioned, the piece I feed is no bigger than the T...usually i try for half the size. I have had more success with it eating med-large cricket legs or the back half of a small cricket. Just make sure that whatever you feed it that been pre killed is removed within 24 hours of feeding if not eaten or partially eaten because it will begin to rot, smell, and possibly foster the growth of mold and/or mites. Sometimes I find it hard to distinguish in the small spiderlings when their abdomen hints that they are in premolt...so I just keep detailed records of their feeding and use that as a determination and that has proved to be effective. I have an A. chalcodes sling (very small) that seems to eat only twice, maybe three times..then burrows and remains hidden for days, emerging maybe once a week to feed a little...then seal itself off again. It has been a slow process feeding and waiting for a molt. Patience, a delicate hand, and good record keeping is key in rearing slings (in my opinion)
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,028
Theyre very good eaters...if its not eating, its pre-molt.

That little guy looked pretty fat.
 
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