Bright Green Phasmid

Taceas

Arachnolord
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May 12, 2006
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659
I found one of these things munching on my Black-eyed Susans, any idea of the genus species?

It's about 4-5" in length and bright green. None of my bug books for my area list green ones, only brown ones.
 

beetleman

Arachnoking
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Jan 5, 2005
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could it be the giant walkingstick(megaphasma denticus)? just a guess,they are supposed to be common there.
 

andy83

Arachnoknight
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Nov 5, 2004
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187
Hey Taceas,

You should post a picture. Its always awesome to catch a native phasmid. You might try browsing through BugGuide.net...
 

ftorres

Arachnobaron
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Oct 29, 2004
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557
HEllo,
I agree with Beetleman,
M dentricus is the biggest US specie, they are super cool stick.
good uck with it.
regards
FT
 

Taceas

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I searched through Bug Guide for a few mins, but all I saw were brown ones.

I did manage to take a picture of it last night.



I'll just leave it be, I've no interest in catching or keeping another mouth to feed. But if its appetite continues, I may have to transplant it elsewhere so it can munch on something besides my flowers. ;)
 

Cheshire

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Jul 7, 2005
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I searched through Bug Guide for a few mins, but all I saw were brown ones.

I did manage to take a picture of it last night.



I'll just leave it be, I've no interest in catching or keeping another mouth to feed. But if its appetite continues, I may have to transplant it elsewhere so it can munch on something besides my flowers. ;)
If you happen to find more, please contact me.

I'm interested in native phasmids. I've been looking here in Iowa for nearly three years with no success :(
 

Mr. Mordax

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Oct 22, 2006
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Uh, Chesh? Just don't tell anyone you moved it accross state lines. ;) Even if it IS native.
 

Taceas

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May 12, 2006
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Good grief, what is the deal with phasmids and their legality? I can think of a LOT more damaging insects, and I don't see much regulation about them. Then again I don't think too many people are interested in Japanese beetles. However if they are, please contact me! =P

To be honest I was just lamenting that I've not seen a stick bug in years. This is the first live one I've seen in at least 5 years.
 

Mr. Mordax

Arachnoking
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Oct 22, 2006
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It bugs me too (no pun intended). Apparently, it's even illegal to transport native ones across state lines. I'm not sure if that includes ones that are native in both states in question, but I wouldn't take any chances.

I'd be excited too. I keep hearing that Oregon has a few native phasmids (and it wouldn't surprise me 'cause I know California does), but none of them are in the Willamette Valley! :mad:
 

Taceas

Arachnolord
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May 12, 2006
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I don't really know the life cycle of phasmids, but I don't really see them being a major threat to greenery like those Gypsy moths in New England are this year, or Japanese beetles are in my flowers this year.

In one day its eaten 3 two leaves...wooo. :p
 

Brad Ramsey

Arachnoknight
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Jun 18, 2007
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The biggest fear is that most are parthenogenetic and some can lay over a thousand viable eggs in a season.
It only takes one .............

-Brad

p.s. Yes, it is illegal to transport insects across state lines even if they are native to both states.

-b.

pss: Cool stick! Great find......move it to some wild bramble (rasberry) it's their favorite!
 
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