Breeding Question

arachnopunks

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2002
Messages
391
We have a pair of C. cyaneopubescens that we would like to breed. We have had the male for about 2 months. He was a little weakened after being shipped. He seemed almost stunned. We ended up putting him in an ICU for about 3 days and he has since eaten and acts like a normal spider. We put his small enclosure into the females 10 gallon and she has taken an interest. She has webbed over his enclosure is some areas. The reason we haven't introduced them yet is because the male has not made a sperm web yet in the time we have had him. His previous owner was not sure if he had ever made one before. Is it safe to assume that he probably has made one at some point and introduce them?? He seems to have an interest in her as well, standing on top of his burrow with his legs spanned wide looking quite large. To be honest, he seemed small and shriveled at first, but now, he is almost as big as she is. We just don't want to waste the male by introducing him too soon. On the other hand, the female recently molted and it would be the perfect time for her to breed. Any thoughts??
 

atavuss

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
1,034
how recent has the female molted? good rule of thumb IME is to wait two months after a female has molted.
unless you actually see the male making and using a sperm web it is almost impossible to know if he is "loaded". if he has matured recently I would just go on the assumption that he has made a sperm web and loaded his palps. most males will destroy their sperm web after it serves its purpose. how fresh is he?
Ed
 

arachnopunks

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2002
Messages
391
She actually molted just over two months ago. She molted about 3 days before he arrived. He has been mature for about 5 months, so I would imagine that he has built one. All of our other males usually leave some remains of the sperm web, but this one has not left a shred of evidence. It may be because of the initial trouble he had, but he has been fine for about a month now and we are surprised he has not made a sperm web. I guess we could introduce them and just keep a careful eye on them at first. I have read that these spiders need to cohabitate for a couple of days. We mated a pair of P. murinus last year, but the female ate the eggsack. They cohabitated for weeks at a time and the male survived to die months later of natural causes. I always thought New World species were more likely to canibalize than Old Worlds so we are hesitant to let them cohabitate for too long. Any thoughts??
 

Immortal_sin

Arachnotemptress
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 17, 2002
Messages
3,955
I have not attempted mating C cyaneopubescens, and am by no means an expert, but I'd go ahead and see if they wanted to mate under supervision!
I don't think I'd let them cohabitate though. Mating with her might induce him to make another sperm web also, or maybe he is making them, and utterly destroying them in the middle of the night!
I have a G rosea couple that has been cohabitating for months, which it's my understanding that that is very unusual, but it's working for them.
The male hangs out in one of the numerous hiding places I have for him, and spins his sperm webs, and the female hangs out in the middle of the container.
I also have a E campestratus couple, but they are not cohabitating. The male is very shy, and the female just molted last week, so they will have to wait for awhile.
And last but not least, the B smithi couple I have here are doing well as well.
She will actually CHASE the male down for mating LOL
Sometimes he wants nothing to do with her.. ;)
Anyway, I'd give it a shot anyway, and see what happens!
 

arachnopunks

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2002
Messages
391
Our P.murinus female would actually go into the males hide-out and retrieve him for mating, assume the position for him without coaxing, and then leave him alone. It was quite humorous.

Originally posted by Immortal_sin
I have not attempted mating C cyaneopubescens, and am by no means an expert, but I'd go ahead and see if they wanted to mate under supervision!
I don't think I'd let them cohabitate though. Mating with her might induce him to make another sperm web also, or maybe he is making them, and utterly destroying them in the middle of the night!
I have a G rosea couple that has been cohabitating for months, which it's my understanding that that is very unusual, but it's working for them.
The male hangs out in one of the numerous hiding places I have for him, and spins his sperm webs, and the female hangs out in the middle of the container.
I also have a E campestratus couple, but they are not cohabitating. The male is very shy, and the female just molted last week, so they will have to wait for awhile.
And last but not least, the B smithi couple I have here are doing well as well.
She will actually CHASE the male down for mating LOL
Sometimes he wants nothing to do with her.. ;)
Anyway, I'd give it a shot anyway, and see what happens!
 
Top