Bit by a weird creature.

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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I just moved into a new place, there are some pine trees around, and I was outside smoking and a bug bit my leg.
I looked down and saw it brushed it off but what in the heck,
Its got bits of pine tree covering its back like a shell or something and nice little mouth parts. Anyone have a clue as to what it is. Its about 5mm.maybe a bit bigger.
I can try and take a picture if no one knows what it is.
 

Widowman10

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yeah try a pic i'll see what i can do. it would help the rest of us out as well.
 

Talkenlate04

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Sort of, not nearly as big as the ones in those pics. And the one that bit me had larger mandables. (I know I spelled that wrong.)
 

Drachenjager

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Sort of, not nearly as big as the ones in those pics. And the one that bit me had larger mandables. (I know I spelled that wrong.)

no you spelled "that" correctly , you misspelled mandible lol... go ahead thump me

i think ive seen something like that before tho
 

Scythemantis

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A lacewing larva? They have big mandibles and many species cover themselves in detritus (sometimes the corpses of prey!)
 

Mr. Mordax

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Last time I checked, we don't have those in Oregon. Botflies don't have much in the way of mandibles, either.
 

Talkenlate04

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So what the heck do they turn into? I mean I guess I am asking what the adults look like. I am thinking of keeping a bunch in a jar or something. But I have no idea what to feed them.

BTW that area he bit me got infected. It was nice and gross. I had to pop it and do the sterile rub down with alcohol.
I still am surprised how bad it hurt. Much worse then a mosquito. It's like he was trying to bore into my leg and live there.
 

Mr. Mordax

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The boring is something that botflies do, but they're tropical -- very unlikely that you'd find them in Oregon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botfly

Lacewing larvae have huge mandibles that they use to skoosh their prey to make it nice and juicy, then they suck the juice through the mandibles. Adult lacewings are slender, green, delicate-looking insects in the order Neuroptera.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroptera

Green lacewing larva: http://is.tc.cc.tx.us/~mstorey/lacewngl.jpg

Like someone mentioned, they sometimes stick the remains of prey onto the hairs covering their bodies.
 

Taceas

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I had one of those lacewing larvae to bite my toe last summer. I was sitting on the couch watching tv with my feet on the floor and it felt like a horsefly bit me on my toe, I look down and there's that ugly little creature chewing into the side of my little toe. I pick it up, duh, and it bites my finger by the fingernail pretty good.

Both spots ended up getting a large infected pimple looking thing and burned like a cigarette burn. :eek:

Needless to say, the little creature was not recognizable by the time I got done with him.
 

Mr. Mordax

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Heh . . . we had a "pet" one in the lab I work in for a couple days last summer. :D We named him Jaws and fed him aphids and large mites. {D

It may suck to get bitten by one, but one of their favorite foods are aphids.
 

myrmecophile

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Interesting, I have been bitten many times by lacewing larvae and never had a bite get infected.
 

Talkenlate04

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Ok well I found another one and got the best picture I could. Can I maybe get a 100% id on this little bugger?

 

Mr. Mordax

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Lacewing larvae for sure. I recognize the jaws. He covered himself in the dead bodies of his fallen adversaries (snacks). {D

Don't kill it -- these guys are really beneficial.
 

Cheshire

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Lacewings and Antlions are both in the order neuroptera. They're actually very closely related, being in the same sub-order and all.

Lacewings, antlions and the rest of their relatives are the most primitive group of insects to undergo complete metamorphoses. Interesting critters, really. If you like bugs, they're worth a google ;)

Info
 
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