Beginner Species

kellygirl

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Would you recommend any of the following as good beginner species?

Millipedes:

Aphistogoniulus sp. (Fire)
Archispirostreptus gigas

Centipedes:

Ephibolus puchripes
Lithobius forficatus
Scolopendra morsitans
Scolopendra polymorpha
Scolopendra sp. (Eastern Bark)
Scolopendra subspinipes
Scolopendra viridis
Trachycormocephalus sp. (Neon Blueleg)


Please forgive me... I know nothing about pedes...YET.

Are there any other species that are typically inexpensive that you might suggest to me? Thanks!

kellygirl
 
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Theraphosa

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I don't know if there are beginner centipedes. I'm also a beginner but I'm very careful keeping a Scolopendra subspinipes (viet. Pede), Haitian Giant (Scolopendra sp.) and a small texas redhead. If you want a centipede that is active, get a Scolopendra subspinipes and if you want something that nice looking, get a Haitian Giant but this one isn't very active. Only active when it's dark. they like to dig too.. ok then the texas redhead.. wow... they are fast...
 

MrDeranged

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Don't know anything about millies, but for the centipedes I can say:

I would go with either the morsitans, polymorpha, or viridis. They all get to around the 6 inch range which is a decent sized pede. Subspinipes I would stay away from as they have really nasty venom. The lithobius and Eastern bark don't get very big and you could probably did up lithobius in your backyard. The Trachy also wouldn't be a bad starter pede.

Scott
 

skolopender

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Hi Kelly,

S. morsitans are definately a good choice to start - i started with that species too and they arn't as fast and aggressiv as the other mentioned species like subspinipes etc.
So it's easier to "handle" them but note, that the morsitans are living in the substrat - so you won't see them very often (i didn't saw one of my morsitans for the last 4 months....)
 

Mister Internet

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There is another pede that I've seen Glades offer every once in awhile that is a smaller, more "docile" Scolopendra, which is S. alternans... it's about 5-6" full grown as well... My personal favorite is S. heros castaneiceps, but the adults are really hard to find sometimes (read: expensive), and they get BIG... they are also a bit more demanding than some of the other species... they are overall fairly even-tempered... however, if your concern is for DISPLAY, then the heros castaneiceps is your best bet, hands down... they are the most strikingly colored pede out there, IMO...
 

Valael

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Do you know where to find S. heros castaneiceps for sale?
 

Mister Internet

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hehe... they're not available terribly often as adults... if I did know, I'd buy them myself :) Just keep checking around... every once in awhile, there are juvies and the occansional adult available.
 

Gillian

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Kelly,
I have the African Giant Black millie. Very, very shy, (but, I'm working on it). Eats like a horse. They do require humidity similar to a blondi.
Peace,
Gillian
 

Valael

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Heh, I did a Google search and it came up Swift Inverts -- But it was out of date and he no longer has them listed. Google lies.





I'm just wanting a fairly large 'pede that's pretty easy to take care of in terms of care requirements -- aggression is the last thing I'm really worried about as I don't plan on sticking my hand in there anytime soon.
 

danread

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To be honest, if you aren't worried about venom or agressiveness, the i would definitely recommend the Scolopendra subspinipes. As long as you are well aware or the dangers and keep in it an escape proof enclosure with high sides, safety need not be an issue. My subspinipes has been fascinating since i bought it, reguarly active during the day and never turns down a meal. Although it's aggressive, it doesn't go mental like my smaller Vanuatu. Here's a pic of my subspinipes, it's presently about 8 inches


Cheers,

Dan
 

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Theraphosa

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Hey Dan,
your Scolopendra subspinipes looks like my Vietnamese Centipede. Now i'm not sure if mine is a Vietnamese Centipede or a Malaysian Centipede. How different between a Viet pede and malay pede?
 

danread

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Hi Theraphosa,

Both the vietnamese and the Malaysian centipede are subspecies of Scolopendra subspinipes. It's a bit of a confusing species, as there are loads and loads of subspecies, all with slightly different colourations and markings, and it has a massive geological range. http://www.tarantulaspiders.com/pages/centipedegallery.htm states that they are found in SE Asia, Africa, India and Indian Ocean islands. From what i can make out, the Malaysian subspinipes has a more uniformly coloured orange/red legs, where the vietnamese has legs that fade from yellow nearer the head, to dark red nearer the caudal tail (at least mine does). Since there are so many variations, and the colours change according to the humidity of the environment they are kept in, i've been told the colour alone is not enough to identify centipede species.

Cheers,

Dan.
 

Mister Internet

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In addition.... they are probably not all "subspecies" so much as color morphs of the same species...
 
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