Baby Rabbits I found

nepenthes

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
561


My dogs stole them from the nest, but didn't hurt them (might have broken ones leg but it still moves). We found the other one, and got them in an empty aquarium with some blankets. I got some Liquid baby supplement, some kitten supplement, and an eye droper and a small animal bottle. If they make it through the nite i will be happy, but i dont have high hopes. One fits just right in my hand.

The reason I havent put them back is because I cant really move them 10 feet from the orginal nest site, and the only safe place would be 40+ feet from the nest site it not more.

Dumb dogs.
 

Dark

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Messages
538
Good Luck, I have tried to help animals that dogs have taken from their nest's, most of time unsuccessful, but I never had rabbit babies taken from their nest so I really can't tell you what to expect, Once Again Goodluck and I hope they reach adulthood. ;)
 

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
2,731
Are they any places by you that take in injured wildlife? Their usually picky about injured/baby songbirds because people find so many of them, but rabbits are less frequently found.
 

nepenthes

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
561
Not that I know of Ill be asking friends tomorrow. I understand the bird one but The dogs would have killed them if i hadn't been their.
 

jr47

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
597
good luck, never had much luck with bunnies. most of the ones i would get totally refused to eat. but i always tried anyway. use to get them away from my cats all the time when i had outdoor kitties.
 

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
2,731
I understand the bird one but The dogs would have killed them if i hadn't been their.

I wasnt saying not to rescue them, I was saying wildlife rehabilitation centers are picky if someone brings in a baby bird because half the time the bird was just young and learning how to fly, so they turn alot of the "patients" down and send them home without taking them in for rehabilitation. But bunnies this age surely wont survive without human intervention.

Its true though, sometimes our pets make it tough because we cant always let young animals fend for themselves knowing our pets can hurt them, its frustrating because you want the animals to live a wild life, but our yards sometimes provide danger and we feel guilty if something happens to the wildlife.

Hopefully the bunnies will live, your doing good. :)
 

nepenthes

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
561
We have been feeding them every couple of hours.

They Made it through the night, one ate a whole dropper of food, the others not very much. My mom is taking them to work where she can feed them every few hours, I'm just worried she will get in trouble, I know at school at the Ag Shop I could keep them in one of the teachers room and Go down every few periods and feed them with out getting in trouble.

Oh well, just glad they made it through the night.
 

kitty_b

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 28, 2006
Messages
1,110
i was a rehabilitator up until a few years ago, so i wanted to just post the info i had to offer as far as care:

they won't eat much in one sitting. rabbits have very small stomachs as babies, and mother's milk is very concentrated (because they often feed only twice a day, or for very short periods of time).

formula: mix esbilac (puppy) formula according to the directions on the can (ratio for puppies older than 7 days). add 1/2 cup of heavy whipping cream to 1 cup of prepared formula to increase fat content. for the first few days, you can make the formula using pedialyte (unflavored) instead of water, to promote hydration. make sure the formula is always warm to prevent chilling the bunny or causing digestive problems.

housing: keep them in a dark, quiet place (away from drafts) and handle as little as possible. they are very prone to stress and subsequent heart failure. make sure 1/3 of the box has a heating pad under it (they NEED supplemental heat). it doesn't have to be hot, just warm. and with an unheated section so they can move if they get to warm. if their eyes are closed, feed every 2-3 hours from 7am to 11 pm. as they get older, feeding times can be stretched to 6 hours apart.

very young babies also have to be stimulated to urinate/deficate. a q-tip soaked in warm water does the trick. just stroke gently (front to back) for about a minute and they should "do their thing." this is ideal for post-feeding. (note: they may be hungry again now that their bladders are empty!) dark urine indicates that they aren't urinating frequently enough. rust-colored urine is common in rabbits. if they're over a week old, they don't need to be stimulated if you can tell that they're "going" on their own.

even if their eyes aren't open, make sure to provide clover, dandelion, and grass to promote nibbling of solid foods.

sorry if you know all this already, but i wanted to post just in case. feel free to PM me if you have any questions, and good luck. :)
 

Tleilaxu

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
1,240
good luck, never had much luck with bunnies. most of the ones i would get totally refused to eat. but i always tried anyway. use to get them away from my cats all the time when i had outdoor kitties.
clover.. they love it. We kept baby bunnies for a few days and they would not stop eating... about depleted the local clover and dandilion population. unfortunetly they need alot of maintance when they are that small or they will die or dehydration and hunger, I fed and watered them three times a day.
 

nepenthes

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
561
Thanks for that Information, I had wondered if I should get some pedialyte.
 

nepenthes

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
561
We got a camera I can use till I get a nicer one but this one isn't that bad for a P&S






 

Taceas

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
May 12, 2006
Messages
659
Sounds familiar. Our dog is infatuated with babies, babies of ANY animal. She takes them from their nest and brings them back to her bed and tries to mommy them like she did for her puppies years ago.

I nursed up 4 wild rabbit babies as well on kitten milk replacer. It took work, but they did do pretty good and I eventually released them. One thing I've learned is to add in some sugar to the formula as rabbit milk tastes pretty sweet in comparison to other animals milk (please don't ask how I know). ;)
 

kitty_b

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 28, 2006
Messages
1,110
they look so good! :D

i didn't realize their eyes were that "open."

i'd recommend slipping in a dish of high-quality commercial rabbit pellets, along with alfalfa (cubes or hay). they also love carrot tops, parsley, soybean, and green beans (along with the plants i already listed). it's also not a bad idea to provide a small, shallow dish of distilled water (or even distilled water mixed with some pedialyte).

i can't recall exactly how long it should be before you wean them off formula, but they should be moving themselves onto solid food very soon. {D
 
Top