B. Vagans and the never ending appetite?

Binky/Carol

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So Johnnie, my B. Vagans juvie molted last week. Its abdomen is a little small.
But man.. talk about a walking vaccum cleaner...
And its been hanging out on its tip toes. Like "I am BIG!!"
Any way.. i waited to put in dinner for a couple of days.. It ate, then ate again..
I wanted to try some meal worms that have been taking up space in my fridge. He ate three. And then he ate a big cricket yesterday.

I feed twice a week, mostly due to having a small scorp, a B. smithi sling, and three smaller juvies.
So what would be a good amount of crickets/meal worms to feed this voracious T?:?

Thanks
Carol
 

Talkenlate04

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Ok well just so you know there is such a thing as over feeding. You would not think so but its true. So once a week if that is plenty. When you do feed a roach or a few crickets is plenty.
 

Mushroom Spore

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You're feeding it too much. :) 1-2 crickets ONCE a week is just fine for a juvie. For bigger Ts I usually feed 2-3 a week.

Tarantulas don't realize they aren't going to starve to death, so they WILL just keep eating and eating in case they don't see food again for six months (like could happen in the wild). It doesn't make it healthy.
 

moricollins

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You're feeding it too much. :) 1-2 crickets ONCE a week is just fine for a juvie. For bigger Ts I usually feed 2-3 a week.
How do YOU know what is too much for a specific tarantula you don't own?

As per your dictum I guess I feed mine WAYYY too much :rolleyes: , all my spiders get fed every second (or sometimes third) day, with as many crickets as I feel the need to feed (usually just one each feeding except with freshly molted specimens (once I start feeding them again that is) who will usually get two per feeding).

Tarantulas don't realize they aren't going to starve to death, so they WILL just keep eating and eating in case they don't see food again for six months (like could happen in the wild). It doesn't make it healthy.
And they'll also stop eating when they've had enough to eat and will fast for months at a time while in captivity ;).
 

Talkenlate04

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How do YOU know what is too much for a specific tarantula you don't own?

As per your dictum I guess I feed mine WAYYY too much :rolleyes: , all my spiders get fed every second (or sometimes third) day, with as many crickets as I feel the need to feed (usually just one each feeding except with freshly molted specimens (once I start feeding them again that is) who will usually get two per feeding).



And they'll also stop eating when they've had enough to eat and will fast for months at a time while in captivity ;).
You will find that Ts are healthier when fed a little less then you are feeding them. No one is saying that they wont eat if you feed them like that cause thats clearly not the case. However some species can get fat and that by nature is not a good thing. Like with the vagans it will eat and eat and eat but does that mean its good for it?
Once a week if that is plenty and your T will still grow and breed and thrive.
 

Mushroom Spore

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You will find that Ts are healthier when fed a little less then you are feeding them. No one is saying that they wont eat if you feed them like that cause thats clearly not the case. However some species can get fat and that by nature is not a good thing. Like with the vagans it will eat and eat and eat but does that mean its good for it?
Once a week if that is plenty and your T will still grow and breed and thrive.
Exactly. There are humans who eat a dozen meals a day, but that certainly isn't healthy either. Keep your shirt on, mori. ;) And really, feeding them multiple prey items multiple times a week means you're speeding up the molting process, making them age faster and shortening their lifespans. They're your Ts, do whatever, but there are people who are going to tell others that powerfeeding is massively unhealthy, and there's nothing you can do about *that*.
 

moricollins

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You will find that Ts are healthier when fed a little less then you are feeding them. No one is saying that they wont eat if you feed them like that cause thats clearly not the case. However some species can get fat and that by nature is not a good thing. Like with the vagans it will eat and eat and eat but does that mean its good for it?
Once a week if that is plenty and your T will still grow and breed and thrive.
Might I enquire as to how you have documented that the tarantula is "healthier" when fed less? Where was this information gained? If it is in an article I would love to read it (I'm a big reader), if not what documented proof is there of this claim of improved health?

Exactly. There are humans who eat a dozen meals a day, but that certainly isn't healthy either. Keep your shirt on, mori. ;) And really, feeding them multiple prey items multiple times a week means you're speeding up the molting process, making them age faster and shortening their lifespans. They're your Ts, do whatever, but there are people who are going to tell others that powerfeeding is massively unhealthy, and there's nothing you can do about *that*.
It's right cold where I live, my shirt and coat are on, thanks for worrying about my health.

How is powerfeeding tarantulas "massively" unhealthy? Can you provide some documented (in journals or other publications) examples please? If not, then the claim that it is unhealthy (much less that it's "massively unhealthy") ought not be be made.

So, decreasing the times between molts is a bad thing? I guess you must be maintaining your spiders in the 60's Fahrenheit as far as temperatures go to make sure they have as long between molts as possible :rolleyes: ;).

Those article references (or other sources of documentation) will be greatly appreciated :D

M.
 

Talkenlate04

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Might I enquire as to how you have documented that the tarantula is "healthier" when fed less? Where was this information gained? If it is in an article I would love to read it (I'm a big reader), if not what documented proof is there of this claim of improved health?



It's right cold where I live, my shirt and coat are on, thanks for worrying about my health.

How is powerfeeding tarantulas "massively" unhealthy? Can you provide some documented (in journals or other publications) examples please? If not, then the claim that it is unhealthy (much less that it's "massively unhealthy") ought not be be made.

So, decreasing the times between molts is a bad thing? I guess you must be maintaining your spiders in the 60's Fahrenheit as far as temperatures go to make sure they have as long between molts as possible :rolleyes: ;).

Those article references (or other sources of documentation) will be greatly appreciated :D

M.

Ok so you want written proof.............. do I have to write down that mcdonalds eaten three times a day 7 days a week 52 weeks a year is bad for you?
Here are some simple things that occur, its fact that a tarantula only has a certain number of molts in its life span. By feeding the way you do you shorten its life...... no matter how you look at it thats not healthy.
I personally feed slings more then I feed juvies and adults. But I do that so they get out of the tiny stage and are more managable. However I know this shortens the over all life of the T. If you increase growth rate you shorten life span.... there is just no way around that.
Another thing, I have seen this myself, when a T becomes fat...... obese a really short fall can cause the abdomen to break open. Regular set ups have to be modified because of that. Litterally something like a 3 inch fall can cause damage that might kill the T.

And lets be clear here I am fine with it. I am pro feeding whenever, however for the most part, but I acknowledge that its shortening the Ts life and could lead to other " undocumented" health concerns. I have said it before when it comes to a B smithi that could live 25-30+ years if I knock off a few years in trade for faster growth I am fine with that but some people are not going to agree that the trade is worth it. I see both sides, but you cant ignore whats common sinse.
 
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Binky/Carol

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Umm guys..
Back to the topic..
Perhaps you forgot that I mentioned my B. Vagans molted the week prior, and its abdomen is a little small...
I feed one cricket per feeding..But since it had just molted I gave it two.

I had to go to the store to get more, but had small meal worms.. I was trying to see if my Skink would eat them, so just happen to hold one with a pair of chop sticks and my b. vagan ate it...
I gave it a total of three 1/2 inch meal worms.. The next day when I had crickets I gave it one good sized one..
It seems a bit ravenous, more than its usual behavior.
I just thought it odd that it feels ravenous.
I feed twice a week to accomodate my sling and my baby scorp and my three juvenile T's. The rest get fed on the same schedule but with only 1-2 crickets per feeding.
I do have a larger T but only feed about 3 a week. And an A. Avic that gets 3 a week. And a rather ravenous Rosea who will eat a dying or newly dead cricket. I will be cutting her back.

But I was wondering if its a post molt thing with the vagans, or it has reached a time in its life where it simply thinks it needs to eat more.
With its leg span its a bit more than 2 inches.. perhaps 3.
Just wondering...
Lets leave McDonalds out of this and personal ethics about powerfeeding...
I don't over feed, or feel that I do..
I thought you were supposed to feed a little more after a molt..
Perhaps not..
That is why I posted the question..
Please read the question that a person posts...
and not go on a rant..
Thanks !!
Carol
 

Talkenlate04

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Threads tend to morph like that from time to time, its all in good fun. Word games are intersting especially when they are dealing with peoples opinions.

So to answer you no there is no set cycle that says ok now I am going to eat more. Its just their nature to kill whatever is hopping around in their area. Think of it this way. In nature they live litterally in holes in the ground. Some wander and search for food but thats extreme for the most part. They lay and wait for any suitable prey to come wandering by and WAM they kill. Now in the spring there is more food about so they might kill more, seemingly preparing for summer when they might be forced to fast because of less prey selection and supply.
So in our house they depend on us. They take what we give them just like nature, after a molt there is nothing wrong with dropping half dozen crickets in there and letting her kill them all. That first meal after a molt is a big deal I think and it gives them new strength and replenishes all that was used for that molt.
Hope this was somewhat helpful........
 

Vaul

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Post moult when my T's have decided its time to eat again, I feed them more slightly smaller meals at a rate of one every 2 days, before resuming my normal feeding reigme. Haven't a clue why, but it seems to work for me. I usually do that until the abdomen looks about right.

No scientific papers or anything to prove its in any way beneficial, just seems to work for me.
 

moricollins

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Name me one animal whose health is improved by obesity.
I highly doubt that Binky/Carol's B. vagans will be obese from feeding it several times a week after it moults ;).


Ok so you want written proof.............. do I have to write down that mcdonalds eaten three times a day 7 days a week 52 weeks a year is bad for you?
Here are some simple things that occur, its fact that a tarantula only has a certain number of molts in its life span. By feeding the way you do you shorten its life...... no matter how you look at it thats not healthy.
I personally feed slings more then I feed juvies and adults. But I do that so they get out of the tiny stage and are more managable. However I know this shortens the over all life of the T. If you increase growth rate you shorten life span.... there is just no way around that.
Another thing, I have seen this myself, when a T becomes fat...... obese a really short fall can cause the abdomen to break open. Regular set ups have to be modified because of that. Litterally something like a 3 inch fall can cause damage that might kill the T.
There's a HUGE difference between eating mcDonald's 3 times a day , 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year, and feeding a tarantula 3-5 crickets a week. Well, unless eating a single cricket a week would have negative effects on the tarantulas health (as eating mcdonald's once a day per year would I'm sure).

I still see no proof that for a tarantula to eat 3 times a week makes it less healthy. It will make it grow faster but that does not equal worse health.

@Binky/Carol : Feed your B. vagans as much as you will like provided that it eats what it is given. Remove food after a couple of hours if it has not been eaten. Your spider knows what's best (I've found them to know more about themselves than we know about them when it comes to feeding and watering anyways.)
 

Talkenlate04

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So you dont see how faster growth equals shorter life span???? If you dont see that then I guess I give up trying to explain it. :rolleyes: :cool:
 

Mina

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So Johnnie, my B. Vagans juvie molted last week. Its abdomen is a little small.
But man.. talk about a walking vaccum cleaner...
And its been hanging out on its tip toes. Like "I am BIG!!"
Any way.. i waited to put in dinner for a couple of days.. It ate, then ate again..
I wanted to try some meal worms that have been taking up space in my fridge. He ate three. And then he ate a big cricket yesterday.

I feed twice a week, mostly due to having a small scorp, a B. smithi sling, and three smaller juvies.
So what would be a good amount of crickets/meal worms to feed this voracious T?:?

Thanks
Carol
Your little one will eat more and be more hungry than usual because it just moulted. Moulting takes lots of energy, and most of mine look a bit thin in the abdomen after a moult. I feed more than normal after each moult.
My B. vagans was a vacuum cleaner for crickets until she got to be close to 3 1/2 inches. She has slowed down somewhat now, but she still eats 3 crickets a week.
Go to once a week feeding, and when you feed, watch the T. If I'm unsure how much to feed, I drop in crickets one at a time, as soon as one isn't snatched immediately, I stop with that many.
Its appetite will taper off after it regains energy and strength from the molt.
 
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