B. smithi safe to handle!?

spider_fan

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I was browsing www.scottstarantulas.com and while reading the gallery entry on the B. smithi, I noticed it said, "experience reccomended prior to handling." This puts the red knee, which has long been hailed as one of the most docile T.'s on earth, in the same handling category as semi-agressive beasts such as L. parahybana and M. robustum on the web site. I first thought it was a typo, but when I checked all the other pics of B. smithi on the site they said the same thing. Is this because it flicks hairs more often than G. rosea and other starter species, or does Scott think B. smithi isn't as laid back as some make it out to be?
 

Talkenlate04

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I think he gears that more toward people that dont know how to handle if they choose to. I handle every now and then, and in my mind I think the only way you are going to get bit by a smithi is if you hold her in your hand and pin her down in your hand. Short of forcing her to bite you I just dont see a smithi biting for any other reason.........
I dont hardly ever hold my smithi's mainly because I have developed a nice little reaction to the hairs on them.
 

spider_fan

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I think he gears that more toward people that dont know how to handle if they choose to
I thought that at first too, but then I saw that he listed other beginner T.'s some that are quicker and more nervous/active than B. smithi, such as Avicularia avicularia and Aphonopelma seemani, as safe to handle. So I don't think that's why. I've never known anyone who was bitten by their red knee, so I'm leaning towards the urticating hairs(and Brachy's tendencies to use them more than other starters) as the reason for this listing.
 

Mina

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I think it could depend on the individual B. smithi. Maybe whoever rated the T's for Scotts site had one that was a real super skittish kicker. Mine is still a tiny sling so I couldn't guess what its temperment will be like when it gets bigger.
 

ErikH

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I would say it is safe unless you are hypersensitive to urticating hairs, or if you have an unusually aggressive/defensive smithi. I have never seen one that wasn't fairly docile, but I am sure someone out there has a psycho ;)
 

spid142

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urticating hairs

I can only guess the reason would be its tendency to flick the hairs, but unless you react badly to them, its no reason to say its not a beginners T. My Red Knee sling hardly ever flicks whereas my Giant White Knee sling flicks pretty often.
 

Thoth

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B.smithti's are not as a sure bet for a handlable t, as many would believe. Across the ones I've dealt with its been 50/50 as to being docile enough to handle. The others were skittish and hair kickers.

Personally, I don't handle any of my ts except a G.rosea I use in the rare demo.
 

spider_fan

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Across the ones I've dealt with its been 50/50 as to being docile enough to handle. The others were skittish and hair kickers.
See, I've handled a few red knee's and all were as calm as could be, they just walked onto my hand and chilled out.
 

spid142

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individual T

This just proves again that whether a particular species is handleable, or not, or calm, or not, depends on each individual specimen.
 

pinkzebra

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I would think it is because of their tendency to flick hairs. Mine has never flicked hairs and is as docile as they come, only wandering off to her hide when disturbed. But I think that is unusual for a B. smithi. Many will flick hairs when bothered and they get bothered easily.
 

phil jones

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i think its the hair fiicking you got to look out for but as one of my ones gives me the evil i should say eyes lol i do not hold any :embarrassed: but thats just me better safe then sorry:eek: -- phil
 

tequila

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Personally i would think that it just depends on the individual, again im a beginner but from everything i have read, and the few i have seen, they seem to be very calm for the most part, its up to you to judge for your specific t, and your experience with them.
 

BPruett

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I play it safe and only handle my T's when they decide they want to run onto my hand or up my arm when getting in the cages. Just observe and enjoy...
 

phil jones

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all ( t ) can be unpredictable and be a bit moody so i DO NOT handle ANY of my ( t ) at any time what with hairs and some will and DO BITE so its a big NO from me :eek: :eek: :evil: :evil: :( :( **** phil
 

cacoseraph

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i have adult female pokies that are more tractable than my ~penultimate male B.smithi.

i imagine the warning is more for the smithi's protection than the humans. i have some juvs that seem like they are sketchy enough to run off my hands and hurt themselves unless i pay attn to them

species might have general trends but each individual might not have read the species description if you know what i mean
 

Daniel_h

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i have a female smithi and i handle her every now and then and i cant see her ever biting unless she is hurt or forced to...she just walks onto my hand and just sits there lol
 

Cory Loomis

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To find out why Scott says this about B. smithi, why don't you e-mail Scott? Our opinions don't explain anything about his assessment. They are just our opinions.
 
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