Anyone breeding Isometrus maculatus?

Hamburglar

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
585
I was just curious if anyone had a project going in the states? I have been interested in this species for a couple years but always seem to miss them when they come up for sale. '

I am not a huge scorpion guy. However, this relatively mild communal has always intrigued me.

I noticed the prices seem to be climbing for them so I would hope to get some before it gets too much higher.. :)
 

scorpionmom

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
349
Most people are looking for them as well. I have not seen them for sale in the U.S. within a year. I myself was looking for them until I got T. bastosi instead. You are right, they have beautiful patterns on them. The best thing to do is be patient and check the Classifieds section and scorpion sellers. Good luck!;)
 

rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
885
i am. i did last year too, problem with these guys is they arent worth jack or squat until they reach past the dreaded 4i hump. for some reason people arent capable of keeping them alive....i havent had any problems. my first clutch from two different pairs of parents are living together just fine and are breeding....so keep your fingers crossed and your eyes on the boards. should have some for sale sometime this summer early fall.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
3,479
I'll bet the problems are in the feeding. The other problem is "humidity" and "attraction of mites"....
The scorplings are very small and need to be fed live pinheads, dead microcrickets or the largest living Drosophyla you can get. Feeding live prey is great, but you can't always get these pinheads (you have to see what you get when ordering, sometimes they are somehwat bigger)...
When feeding dead prey, you need to take out the remains within 24-36 hours, to prevent mold or mites.
I have bred this species for some time a couple of years ago, and these young seem susceptible to the things mentioned above and easily intimidated by too large prey items (= not eating, thus not growing)..

It takes some time and effort to raise species with tiny young (Tityus ocelote, Neochactas sp. etc.), but with each instar, they become stronger!
 

voldemort

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 19, 2006
Messages
198
from my limited experience Isometrus maculatus do have small slings (about 1/2 - 1/3 of that of an HH) and feeding really is a problem. i have 3 moms that pop almost simultaneously this month.

try roach nymph and worker termites, i have some 2i that eats these nymphs while holding another. I try to speed up their growth up until 41 and then gradually diminish the prey item.

cannibalism is evident but not that rampant if provided with plenty of hides and climbs and suitable prey items.
 
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