Another what is this

myrmecophile

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
599
I am probably posting this in the wrong forum but I have been puzzled by this guy for a couple of years now, It was found in my backyard when I was living in Hesperia, in the Mojave Desert Calif. For all practical purposes it appeared to be a fully mature male Tarantula however it was only about 1 1/2 -2 inches. I was certainly no wolf spider I had ever seen but I guess it could be one. Any ideas??

 

Spaceman_Spiff

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Messages
222
It is a Mygalomorph spider, that's for sure.
The metatarsi on the first pair of legs look conspicuous, seems to have tibial spurs!
Maybe a Nemesiidae?
 

myrmecophile

Arachnobaron
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Dec 22, 2006
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599
It doesn't look at all like the No longer common Southern California Trap doors I am familiar with. I will post another pic I just relocated asap, it may help.
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
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Apr 6, 2006
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1,977
Either Barychelidae or Nemisiidae (Don't know the differences between the two yet) definately not a theraphosid.
 

lucanidae

Arachnoprince
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Jan 15, 2006
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1,081
It's a mature male Cyrtaucheniidae; either genus Aptostichus or Apomastus. The only Nemesiids found in that area are the 5 species of Calisoga, which is the spider in question is not. Also, there are no Barychellidae in North America.
 

myrmecophile

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
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599
Lucanidae, excellent many thanks. Based on the little I have been able to find Apomastus has an extremely limited range in California and I am barely outside of it, range maps indicate Aptostichus does occur in my area so my money is on that genus. Although like I say so often critters dont read the range maps.
 
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myrmecophile

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
599
Dr Jason Bond from East Carolina University and Dr Marshall Hedin of SDSU have taken a look at the picture and have given their input by email. They both agree that this is what this mystery bug is. Many thanks to all that offered their opinions.
 

myrmecophile

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
599
Good luck. As hot and dry as it has been up in the high desert you may not have very much luck except finding the very common stuff. Black widows are quite plentiful this as year as they usually are.
 
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