Androctonus SP? Need help!

Philip111375

Arachnopeon
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Jan 14, 2011
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Hi all,
I recently received some androctonus species. Some are bicolor and crassicauda. But there are few species which i doubt are crasicauda. Will appreciate any help. Thanks






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Michiel

Arachnoking
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I don't see any A.bicolors in the pics. Check out the leg of the scorp in the last picture, it has a bad mycosis spot......
 

Philip111375

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Thanks for the reply Michiel.
I didn't include the a. bicolor. Just wondering what androctonus species this is. Do you have any idea? Yes i also notice the mycosis on the leg, hoping that it stops spreading.
 
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Koh_

Arachnoangel
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it looks like australis with dumped or kept in wet peat moss for a while
 

Michiel

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Thanks for the reply Michiel.
I didn't include the a. bicolor. Just wondering what androctonus species this is. Do you have any idea? Yes i also notice the mycosis on the leg, hoping that it stops spreading.

Hi,

It's a male and it could be A.crassicauda, but I have never seen a specimen with such light pedipalps. These differences in coloration could be attributed to "intraspecific variation", but there is also a small chance that it is another species. Do you happen to the exact locality (country, city/ area) where they come from?

Regards, Michiel
 

Galapoheros

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I can't help on the ID but the black spot may only be an injury. Injuries usually turn black. I don't know if there have been studies but it's been my speculation that the black color caused by mycosis is not the color of the fungus but is the color of the damage it causes, whether it is caused by a fungus or from a more mechanical source, it generally turns black. Mycosis usually starts around joints and normally shows up symmetrically on the joints at first. Michiel have you come across any studies of the color of the fungus that causes mycosis compared to the color of simple injury to a scorpion? I do not see this brought up often and have wondered about it.
 
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Philip111375

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Hi michiel, The seller said it all came from morocco and has no idea what species he sent me. I now have 5 of them of the same coloration. Counted their pectines 3 are 31 and 2 are 24 and 26, but all have the same big light colored pedipalps

Thanks Galapoheros for that info.
 

Michiel

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I can't help on the ID but the black spot may only be an injury. Injuries usually turn black. I don't know if there have been studies but it's been my speculation that the black color caused by mycosis is not the color of the fungus but is the color of the damage it causes, whether it is caused by a fungus or from a more mechanical source, it generally turns black. Mycosis usually starts around joints and normally shows up symmetrically on the joints at first. Michiel have you come across any studies of the color of the fungus that causes mycosis compared to the color of simple injury to a scorpion? I do not see this brought up often and have wondered about it.

No I haven't and I don't keep desert species anymore. I have made some pictures in the past of black spots in scorpions, stumps of walking legs with a black end and soforth...These spots are always brownish, blackish and I have no idea, if the coloration of the healed exocuticle and the coloration of the fungus itself, is different. That is a both interesting and tough question. When I read your post a question popped in my mind: How did the OP's scorpion get injured?

@Philip,

If these are from Morocco it cannot be A.crassicauda because that does not occur there. Given the pectinecounts, you seem to have three males and two females, so that's very good so you can breed them. There are five more "dark"species: A.gonetti, A.sergenti, A.marrocanus, A.liouvillei,A.mauretanicus. When I look at the coloration and habitus it is either A.gonetti or A.sergenti and maybe A,marrocanus, but that is the least probable.

If have to run now, have an appointment, more later...
 
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