alternative t housing

Weapon-X

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
774
i know i posted about this before , but i would like to maybe see some other ideas especialy t enclosures that people have come up with on their own with a some imagination, so far i've been using 1) 10 gallon tank 5 medium deli cups, 3 large jars, 1 small kritter keeper, 1 medium kritter keeper, i would like to actualy use sterlite plastic shoeboxes, but heating them seems a problem, anyone ever think of bulding a rack system for arachnids?????, i looked around on the net for a good place to buy plastic shoeboxes but really did'nt find anything i was thinking, but i did find a few sites that can make and have containers in mind for t's some of them seemed a bit small to me though heres the site for anyone intrsted, www.pioneerplastics.com, not to bad on prices. so please let me see your different ideas for housing t's, thanks ahead of time----Jeff
 

Gail

Arachnopixie
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
521
Jeff, you mention that you feel heating would be a problem with the sterlite plastic containers. Do you keep your place at least 70 degrees in the winter? If you do and you place the cages where they won't get any cold drafts you really shouldn't need any more heat unless you have T's you want to breed. If you do want to heat the containers you can't, of course, put a heat mat right on them as it would likely melt them, but you can lay a heating pad down, place a cookie rack on that and then put the plastic box on the cookie rack. Rising heat will do the trick without melting the plastic. Another possibility are the heating mats sold specifically for seed starting as they usually are intended for the plastic seed trays to sit right on them so they obviously couldn't get so hot that they would melt plastic.
As for types of containers, I have many different inexpensive plastic storage boxes that I use. I just found something at, of all places, the grocery store last night which is fantastic. They are called "hit box" (Don't know why...) but they are perfectly clear - both box AND lid. There are handles that snap up over the top to lock it in place. About 12 x 18 x 8 inches they are perfect size for most adult terrestrial T's. At $2.50 each you can't beat it.
You mentioned a rack system and there is something that I have decided to make when I get the time which is like a rack system. I am going to go to Ikea and buy one of their tall, deep book cases with the glass doors on the front. I'm going to drill 1.5" holes in the shelves, probably about 4 to 8 per shelf to allow heat to rise up from the very bottom shelf where I am going to install two porcelean light bulb fixtures. I figure I can put in a couple of 100 watt bulbs which, with the doors closed, should generate enough rising heat to keep the whole thing at about 80 to 85 degrees. Of course I'll have to play with bulb size and such to get just the right heat level, but I intend to use this to keep those T's which I will be breeding in the future. I might also decide to try using wire rack shelves instead of drilling holes. This isn't my original idea, I actually read about this setup somewhere but I don't remember where.

Gail
 

atavuss

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
1,034
Originally posted by Gail
Jeff, you mention that you feel heating would be a problem with the sterlite plastic containers. Do you keep your place at least 70 degrees in the winter? If you do and you place the cages where they won't get any cold drafts you really shouldn't need any more heat unless you have T's you want to breed. If you do want to heat the containers you can't, of course, put a heat mat right on them as it would likely melt them, but you can lay a heating pad down, place a cookie rack on that and then put the plastic box on the cookie rack. Rising heat will do the trick without melting the plastic. Another possibility are the heating mats sold specifically for seed starting as they usually are intended for the plastic seed trays to sit right on them so they obviously couldn't get so hot that they would melt plastic.
As for types of containers, I have many different inexpensive plastic storage boxes that I use. I just found something at, of all places, the grocery store last night which is fantastic. They are called "hit box" (Don't know why...) but they are perfectly clear - both box AND lid. There are handles that snap up over the top to lock it in place. About 12 x 18 x 8 inches they are perfect size for most adult terrestrial T's. At $2.50 each you can't beat it.
You mentioned a rack system and there is something that I have decided to make when I get the time which is like a rack system. I am going to go to Ikea and buy one of their tall, deep book cases with the glass doors on the front. I'm going to drill 1.5" holes in the shelves, probably about 4 to 8 per shelf to allow heat to rise up from the very bottom shelf where I am going to install two porcelean light bulb fixtures. I figure I can put in a couple of 100 watt bulbs which, with the doors closed, should generate enough rising heat to keep the whole thing at about 80 to 85 degrees. Of course I'll have to play with bulb size and such to get just the right heat level, but I intend to use this to keep those T's which I will be breeding in the future. I might also decide to try using wire rack shelves instead of drilling holes. This isn't my original idea, I actually read about this setup somewhere but I don't remember where.

Gail
Gail, zoo-med makes a device where you can plug in your lights and the lights will be shut off and on to regulate the temp to whatever you set it to. you could even use red or blue bulbs so that if they come on at night to bump up the temps the lights wont disturb the t's.
Ed
 

Chris

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 9, 2002
Messages
284
I look at what these places are charging for thermal regulators and it makes me think I am doing the wrong thing for work!!

I am an electronics guru so I should start building these things... they are really quite simple now that I think about it.

I will build a prototype soon and see how much I can build them for then I will let you all know (I am thinking around 50 bucks)
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 27, 2002
Messages
1,258
I would think it could be done even cheaper than that. all you need is either a thermistor or the guts from a mercury/circular spring type wall thermostat. The wiring would be really easy to do. I would think the thermistor would be the superior choice because you could get the heat lamps to come on at varying voltages, and therefor varying temperaturs, rather than an on/off type of situation. Also, being level wouldn't be an issue.

Bill
 

Botar

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Messages
1,442
I've recently converted a bedroom to my "T room". I made a rack system using shelving purchased from Home Depot. There is a fan in the room to circulate the air, a humidifier on a timer that keeps the humidity at about 40% in the room, and an oil filled radiant heater that someone had recommended on this site earlier. The temp stays between 75 and 80 F. The fan keeps the temp fairly even throughout the room. I've got a digital heat/humidity meter (upper right) that reads from both the unit and a probe which is on the bottom shelf. Seems to be working great.

Botar

Edit: Yes Holley, it was Emma's play room. This room was one of the smallest in the house, so I took it over. Her toys have been moved to a larger room... although she has requested a paint job in the new room.
 
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Exodus

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
Messages
220
are you keeping one of your T's in that water Jug?If so, which species?
 

Botar

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 27, 2002
Messages
1,442
No, that's just for water for the humidifier. Also, ala Code Monkey, I've turned a brown orb weaver loose in the room and it has built it's web in the window.

Botar
 

mebebraz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 27, 2002
Messages
551
to much of my wifes dismay, I actually built a spider room in my living room, kinda like an addition inside the house. Its built on top of a heater duct thats adjustable, so I can increase or decrease the temp at will, underneath I put a pot of water for humidity, I have a door that I put that shink type plastic on, if it gets too hot in the summer, I take the plastic off, and its totally contained so no escapees.
 

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