Aggressive or defensive Terrestrial OW Ts?

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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Dec 14, 2009
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I want to start keeping some OW terrestrials.I really like watching them eat,so I'd like some more aggressive species.what are some that fit this description?thanks for your help!
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
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Jul 18, 2010
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241
King Baboon, or a Pokie. Pokies aren't very defensive they would rather run than fight but their feeding response is great.
 

Ariel

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One thing you might want to be aware of are that most Terrestrial OW Ts tend to be obligated burrowers, though some more then other, with that here are my suggestions.

I'm biased, but I'd suggest some kind of baboon.

A good starter OW, with minimum defensive behavior, I'd have to suggest E. pachypus, the stout leg baboon. A gorgeous T with enlarged fuzzy back legs. I had mine for a month or so now and I have to say they make a great addition to any collection! They're notorious diggers, though I've found that they will also take to a hide. My girl never burrowed even though she has ample substrate, she finally settled down when I offered her a hide. So far she's proved to be a good eater, though certainly not an aggressive one.

Then there is the Pterinochilus genus. I have two from this genus, a 5" female P. murinus and a 3" male P. chordatus.

My P. murinus has taken more to the arboreal lifestyle, creating an awesome tube web behind some cork bark. She's very skittish when it comes to vibrations and air movement, but start poking around her lair and she becomes very defensive. Over all a gorgeous T, with a beautiful orange color and great carapace and abdominal patterns. Not to mention easy to find and super cheap!

P. chordatus seem to be a little less readily available. In my experience they're also more terrestrial compared to P. murinus. I've heard of them burrowing but mine never did, he simply webbed over everything in his enclosure and seems perfectly content. So far I've seen a little more attitude from this species then P. murinus, though I'd say it's pretty much even. They have an over all darker color then P. murinus, but have gorgeous patterns.

The other species in the Pterinochilus genus is P. lugardi. They have a lighter, tan, color about them, with similar patterns to the other two. I've heard these tend to web less and burrow more. I, however don't have any experience with this species yet, it's only a matter of time though. :)

Someone suggested King Baboon, scientific name Pelinobius muticus however you will find more information under the scientific name Citharischius crawshayi, the name change is really recent. Maybe it's just me, but these don't seem really all that available, and unlike members of the Pterinochilus genus, they grow agonizingly slow! However a full grown adult female is truly a sight to behold! They get large with the beautiful tawny color with those amazing enlarged back legs! these are notorious for being diggers, I don't think I've heard of one that didn't dig! From what I hear this species is very defensive, though I've never owned one. (always wanted to, but lack of availability and price have kept me from doing so.)

There are so many other species to consider as well, such as members of the Hysterocrates genus. Which are also burrowers. There's also the augacephalus genus. Members of this genus are amazingly gorgeous but difficult to find. :eek:

And if you choose not to go the baboon route, there's Hapalopelma, Chilobrachy, and Selenocosmia, for other genera to look into, I've never owned or really done research into these yet. And I know there are a few others but I can't think of them.

Anyway, on my ending note, I really suggest E. pachypus, I love my girl, if not one of those some kind of Pterinochilus.
 

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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i have a c.crawshayi that i;m trying to sell as it grows WAY to slow for my likeing.i really like faster growing species.i have a p.murinus,and i love it,but it is moreso arboreal.i really like my C.faciatum.i know she's not an OW,but she acts like it.she never kicks hairs,but she tries to bite constantly!and she's so pretty!
 

brian abrams

Arachnosquire
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First OW T

If you want an agressive and a good "starter" OW T, then I would suggest an OBT.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
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How about a type of Ceratogyrus? Those horns are pretty cool.
 

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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Dec 14, 2009
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i was thinking about them.i am getting a darlingi sling in a trade.i'm excited!

anyone know of any new worlds that are fast and aggressive?i know c.faciatum,but what else?i don't necesarily want only OW,i just want an agressive terrestrial T.

how about cobalt blues?i know they're OW,but how mean are they?
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
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Aug 15, 2005
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how about cobalt blues?i know they're OW,but how mean are they?
Mean if you go digging into their burrows looking for a fight. Shy and skittish otherwise. Once they've established a burrow, they won't be around the surface much. Your only chance to see the defensive behavior will be with rehousing.

My favorite OW are Chilobrachys species. I have two shy juveniles who hide in their web, but my female 7" Chilobrachys sp. "Guangxiensis" is the definition of "standing ground." Not skittish at all. You touch her, she'll wheel around, stridulating and slapping the ground with her legs. She doesn't hide much either.

It's best illustrated.
 

Scorpionking20

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May 31, 2010
Messages
158
Swifts has some interesting Australian Ts you may be interested in. Though since they are newer to the hobby not as much info may be available on them. Something worth considering perhaps!
 

Mack&Cass

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Oct 14, 2007
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My favorite OW are Chilobrachys species. I have two shy juveniles who hide in their web, but my female 7" Chilobrachys sp. "Guangxiensis" is the definition of "standing ground." Not skittish at all. You touch her, she'll wheel around, stridulating and slapping the ground with her legs. She doesn't hide much either.[/IMG]
I second the Chilos. Our mature female Chilobrachys sp. Guangxiensis is also a complete nutjob. She is our most intimidating and most unpredictable by far. She also does what you described about slapping the ground, she is best described by one word: explosive.

Cass
 

andy375hh

Arachnoknight
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Feb 13, 2007
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Get a Haplo species Ie Cobalt Blue, Longipies etc. They are the most defensive as well as agressive T's I own.
 

neubii18

Arachnosquire
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i am thinking about the cobalt blue as one.i have a trade offer for a 6" female,so i'll probably have to accept that offer.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
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Apr 11, 2007
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Pretty much anything but a E. pachypus should set you right.
 
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