Active, visible T's

C L Coles

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 25, 2007
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13
Of the genus suggested for beginners, (Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Grammostola), which would be the most active and visible? Mostly i'm looking for T's that won't hide all the time (I do understand that they will hide at times, eg: during molting). By active I mean moving around a bit, not flying off the walls!
 

secular

Arachnosquire
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Jan 26, 2006
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well, here's my experience:

all of my Brachy's (smithi, emilia, boehmei) sit out in the open pretty much all of the time. you won't really see them moving around much but they certainly don't just sit in the same spot all the time. the boehmei is probably my favorite in terms of looks and behavior.

my Aphonopelmas include seemani, chalcodes, and sp. "Flagstaff Orange". the flagstaff orange sealed itself into a burrow months ago and has not come out since. the other two both spend most of their time visible. in particular i've read lots of varying reports on seemani, many probably consider them obligate burrowers. the chalcodes and seemani are both very active, curious, and like to eat!

i only have good old G. rosea. out all the time, but not really any less active than say, the Brachy's on the shelf below.. G. rosea is common but that was my first T so of course i wouldn't be without it. ;)
 

edesign

AB FB Group Moderatr
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I realize it's not on your list...but Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens (aka GBB) is a species I think a beginner could be comfortable with, grow to a decent size (and fast), eat a lot, are colorful, and are one of the more active T's I have owned.

Of the ones on your list...I have an A. seemani that was the first T I bought two years ago or so. Basically a pet rock for days at a time, but they are fun to watch when digging a burrow :)

Use the search engine here on the forums (top right corner, small white text)...search for the keywords you want "active" and "visible". You'll get plenty of results...you can add in the genus too if you want, but i suggest only doing one at a time or your results may be too confined.
 

Mushroom Spore

Arachnoemperor
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Oct 14, 2005
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By active I mean moving around a bit, not flying off the walls!
No such tarantula. Tarantulas like to sit, and they like to sit for hours or days on end.

If you want something visible, try C. cyaneopubescens.

EDIT: Curse you edesign! *shakes tiny e-fist*
 

secular

Arachnosquire
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Jan 26, 2006
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128
i have C. cyaneopubescens as well and that's a cool specimen. just be prepared because they are speedy little critters! maybe you could also consider E. campestratus (pink zebra beauty).
 

Bothrops

Arachnobaron
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Jan 6, 2004
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My Grammostola pulchra is always visible, she is almost never in her hide.
 

C L Coles

Arachnopeon
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Jan 25, 2007
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Thanks for the suggestions. C. cyaneopubescens has also recently been added to my list as i've heard that it is really colourful. I will be checking out availability of this and other species once I narrow my list down a bit. I'm not sure about lifespan of T's; if I buy a larger one (old enough to sex), will I have at least 10 years or so (assuming I get a female)? I know T's lifespan varies, but a larger animal will cost me a lot more, so I would like a longer lifespan in return.
 

patexan

Arachnopeon
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Dec 9, 2006
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i have C. cyaneopubescens as well and that's a cool specimen. just be prepared because they are speedy little critters! maybe you could also consider E. campestratus (pink zebra beauty).
My PZB is somwhat of a pet rock. Hardly ever moves.
 

edesign

AB FB Group Moderatr
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I'm not sure about lifespan of T's; if I buy a larger one (old enough to sex), will I have at least 10 years or so (assuming I get a female)? I know T's lifespan varies, but a larger animal will cost me a lot more, so I would like a longer lifespan in return.
depends on the species...lifespans are just that, from start to finish. So say a species' females live for 10 years...and say they mature in 2 years...if you buy it right after the maturing molt then it will live about 8 more years. If you buy a sexed female of such a species when it is a 2.5" juvenile...you would probably have it for 9 years, roughly.

GBB's grow really fast...without powerfeeding (a lil overfed probably, but not stuff to the brim or anywhere near it) my male went from around 1" to 4.5" (roughly) in just over a year. The slings of this species grow really fast and watching them progress through the color pattern changes is fascinating, plus as the T gets larger you grow with it and tend to be more comfortable around it. I HIGHLY suggest this species ;) They can be fast when startled...but they just run it short little bursts so they don't go far.
 

arrowhd

Arachnolord
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Dec 22, 2006
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My C. cyaneopubescens is about 1 inch in size. The growth rate of this thing is amazing. I purchased it in early December 2006 and after 2 molts it almost doubled in size. Looks a little bit different after each molt. Stays out in the open always and webs over everything.

My B. smithi is about 1 inch also. Almost always in the open. Very cool little guy too. I think about any of the species you are looking into are good choices for what your wanting in a T.
 

Merfolk

Arachnoprince
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Lasiodora Parahybana : Gave mine holes and hides... never even got inside, a real attention whore.

Pokie regalis : Mine is always out and runs all accros its enclosure. The hunt is quite a show.

Give a moth to any arboreal and you'll have plenty of kung-fu style stunts!!!:worship: :worship: :worship:
 

GartenSpinnen

Arachnoprince
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Well if i honestly had a choice in what Ts i have experience with that fit what you want i would say go for an L. parahybana. Mine is always out running about, its beautiful T, and its very active. Also they grow very quickly, up to 6" in just over a year from a tiny sling. Very nice T!
 

x-fan

Arachnosquire
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Sep 23, 2005
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i think you can try A. geniculata, it's not as active as L. parahybana i guess but is't great display T. Mine is never ever hiding, molting outside it's burrow ( doing it right now :)) ) and eating like a pig. And it is still 1/5" sling :)) I can hardly imagine what it will be once it reaches 8" :)))
From what i've read geniculata is more calm than parahybana ... i've got geniculata, and i'm gonna buy parahybana right after getting my H. maculata in monday :)))If i had enought money to support them .... there will be no T that i wont have but ... for now i'll have to make it somehow with only 8 ;-((
 

Selenops

Arachnoangel
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Dec 13, 2006
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In certain controlled conditions and kept snug as a bug in a rug, my three Haplos are quite active even during the daytime hours C/O flannel shirt draped over the terrarium.

Well, um, they're frequently visible ... often motionless or feeding.
 

dangerprone69

Arachnoknight
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Oct 18, 2004
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i have C. cyaneopubescens as well and that's a cool specimen. just be prepared because they are speedy little critters! maybe you could also consider E. campestratus (pink zebra beauty).
E. campestriatus is a great spider, EXTREMELY docile. But don't expect it to do much. Mine stays in her burrow and almost never ventures out.
 

darkness_falls8

Arachnosquire
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Nov 19, 2006
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Definately a L. Parahybana. They're hardy, excellent display spiders! mine usually sits out all day in plain sight. she also loves to move dirt around in the cage to the way she likes it. They also grow really fast. I bought mine about 2 months ago at 5'5" she's now around 7" I love my L.para... I wouldn't trade her for a P.Metallica.:razz:
 

seanrc

Arachnoknight
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Aug 2, 2006
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honestly out of all the T's i have .. My ROSEHAIR is the most active.. never staying still to long... she digs constantly .. moves stuff around. climbs all the time.. she somthing else..
 

Scott C.

Arachnofloater
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Sep 17, 2004
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IME the most visable, and active Ts, are the unhappy ones.
There are many good suggestions here already, but I suggest a different criteria for the choice of what to get..... Visable, and active aren't really very good descriptions of healthy Ts as far as I can tell.
More active/visable Ts have less to do with the sp., than with the set up, from what I have seen.
For example, my previously more active G. rosea, is now a burrow dwelling rock, after her cage change with a more appropriate substrate. My C. cyaneopubescens is a ghost, now that I have better simulated where they burrow in the wild. She seemed quite content in her web tubes built all around her cage, until I added the "exposed roots". No more GBB now.
You want visable, you can control it with many different sp.. I would speculate that if they are in control though, and the habitat is suitable, they will not be too visable.
 
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