Abedus herberti

buthus

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Abedus herberti






Major change of plans late in the evening/early morning ...noticed these hatching and getting eaten like crazy!
From what I read, the young are eaten readily by adults. Also, they can have a large mortality rate because of molt problems..usually because of lack of structure for them to latch on to. I see a lot of dead nymphs, but it is hard to say what the cause of death is. I suspect (from what I observed in a short time) most deaths are due to cannibalism.

Anyway... :Rockon: I'm happy with whats going on and I hope I can raise a bunch of these! I've wanted to keep these since I saw them in some aquarium book I had when I was a kid.
Now I finally have a good use for tropical fish ... :Dancedevil:





Fights a breakin' out! Witnessed several battles between the male (one with eggs) and what I am guessing is a female.




My other male. Not eating as many young, but chewing some down nevertheless. Both the other adults are now in separate containers.


They molt very soon after hatching, but I have not figured out how long that is.
This pic shows the 2 stages that the young are in at the moment.


You can see "she" is eating one of the nymphs. I have a feeling she has been engorging all night.




Cute now but soon to be a ferocious terror!


Kind of cool I'd say.
Working on an "enclosure" for these ...now the fire is under my azs.


BTW... this page got me thinking about these again (and those beautiful water "scorps") and its info has been a godsend.
MantidsAssassins

Any other info or suggestions would be appreciated! Oh...and to be honest, I have not had the time to search VL or AB for info and of course i should be doing so. Must be more than a few members here that have kept these. (?)



Now to get all the nymphs into cups before they start hunting down each other.
 

HepCatMoe

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wow those are freakin cool. what do you feed the adults? after a little research i assume fish?

can you post some pics of them hunting/eating? seriously those guys are freakin awesome.
 

buthus

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wow those are freakin cool. what do you feed the adults? after a little research i assume fish?

can you post some pics of them hunting/eating? seriously those guys are freakin awesome.
Yeah, I think they are freakin cool to. I can see myself really getting into the realm of communal predatory insects!

They seem to eat just about anything thats 1/4 their size or smaller...though I have not had them long enough to experiment with larger food ...nor have I tried fish yet. Meal worms, spiders, crickets, earwigs, earthworms and roaches have all been taken.
Pics of feeding and hopefully other behavior will eventually be shot. I have collected and traded for far too many critters lately to keep up with documentation. :? :rolleyes:
 

HepCatMoe

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i personally do not think i could refrain from feeding a vertebrate to an invert. you know, just a guppy or something.

but dang that would be fun to watch.... :p
 

Mr. Mordax

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The young have very high mortality; I have a colony of A. herberti, and the grad student I know who did his research on them got at best a 10% survival rate.

The young need to be in individual containers with frequent water changes (within 8 hours of feeding) -- that's why they're dying. It's not always cannibalism.

Also, they aren't molting immediatly after hatching. They just darken is all. It'll be a week or two (at least) before they molt to second instar. The abovementioned grad student used hex head bolts standing on-end in 4-oz deli cups for them to molt on.

I fed my first instars 1/2 or 1/3 pieces of mealworm, but they have to be removed and be given a water change 8 hours or so later. Second instars can take whole mealworms (as long as they're small). Drosophilla spp work too, but it takes a few to make a meal.

Egg-bearing males usually have supressed appetites. It's more likely that the neighbors are doing the baby-muching. Really frustrating example: I offered all my adults food one day, and then the next one of my females (who refused food earlier) snagged a passing nymph. :(

Good luck with the babies, and if you have any other questions, ask me! :D
 

nepenthes

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Too cool!
What happens to the egg's do they just kinda fall off?
 

galeogirl

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Those are one of my dream inverts. Someday.

Great pics, thanks for posting them.
 

dtknow

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Holy cow! Are these adults from Wade? Also, what are you feeding them and how much/often? I've never gotten that many eggs from mine. In fact, the last batch a grand total of 12 nymphs hatched.

The nymphs are pretty difficult to raise. I am doing experiments with keeping them together a large plastic dishpan(also have a small preform pond I can use). It seems to be working so far but a few do get eaten. The adults do love to eat the nymphs. I suspect some of your nymphs drowned. I found keeping them in tanks thick with plants helps in that regard.

I've fed mine crickets, redworms(*yawn* not much success), a few B. lateralis, and the random craneflies or whatever crosses my path that is big enough. I don't think I feed them often enough based on your photos though! They will eagerly tackle goldfish at least half their size but are not quite fast enough to catch them easily.
 

Mr. Mordax

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What happens to the egg's do they just kinda fall off?
When all the eggs hatch, the cement binding them to the male's wings dissolves and a sheet of eggshells falls off. I had one male with several dead, unhatched eggs, who spent lots of time out of the water trying to aerate them (the grad student said he knew there were unhatched eggs and that he was still trying to get them to hatch). As per the advice I recieved, I left that male in a separate tub with no climbing stuff to get him nice and wet, then gently pulled on the egg casings while pushing down on the male. They separated easily.

Sorry if that sounded like a thread-jacking, but it's some good advice if you ever have that sort of problem. :)
 

buthus

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IHeartMantids, thanks for the info...much appreciated. :cool:

Ok.. I forgot to edit my bad info regarding molting here. Yes, they were just darkening and all of the empty shell (dead) were but victims of the hungry adults. They not only darken (fast) but they seem to increase in size as they do so. Anyway...bad info from a very tired observer. :rolleyes:

The second male's hatch is doing very well ...I cant even see any mortalities. Im leaving them together and power feeding the bunch. The first batch I separated (maybe 90%) into separate cups. Only one or two died after doing so. All the adults have feed a couple of times already. I love the fact that I can feed them by hand...literally! :D

Heres a nymph I found some 10 feet away from the rest ...wrapped up and being consumed by one of my Pholcus room mates.


Here are the egg casings...


And a little feeding time fun...
herberti nymph-feed

edit: IHeartMantids, have you or your friend had any success with young reaching adulthood within the community tank? Im thinking lots of cover and regular feeding. ??
I am working on an enclosure type tank ...if it holds H2O when its finished ... I figure Ill need a decent sized (docile) bottom feeder or two to take care of the carcasses and general waste. Any suggestions?
On that note, has there been any success with keeping large water beetles or any other species with these? Non-aggressive fish?

I desire other species ...soon ...hook me up! ;) :D
 
Last edited:

Gigas

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In the image of the eggs is on patch upside down?
 

Galapoheros

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Wow! I've kept these off and on as well as the giants years ago. But I've never observed them in detail like in this thread. It's motivating me to get some more of'em. I think I'm going to be a net scooping jesse when it warms up. Just so happens I've had a 10 gal set up for a few years, but the only things in it are Daphnia and little snails. I had a big salamander in there but I put it outside. Time for some water bugs I guess. Cool thread.
 

Mr. Mordax

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edit: IHeartMantids, have you or your friend had any success with young reaching adulthood within the community tank? Im thinking lots of cover and regular feeding. ??
Ye Olde Grade Studente thought of separating nymphs into a large container with lots of perches and letting the stronger ones "duke it out" to separate the weaker and help with feeding . . . in a communal tank with adults, I'd suggest LOTS of hidey-holes and some sort of filtration system. The adults handle "gross" water much better than the nymphs.

In the image of the eggs is on patch upside down?
Based on my experience, I'd say the one on the left is.
 

dtknow

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Great updates Buthus, would you be able to answer the feeding questions in my first post please? The number of nymphs you produced must be incredible. I'm guessing a few hundred.

I think raising the nymphs communally might be best. We know some weak ones are going to die, they might as well feed the ones that will make it. Currently out of 5 nymphs I put into a communal dishpan full of mozzies and scuds I think three are left.

I doubt the nymphs would last long in an adult tank unless you had some mechanical method of seperation. Perhaps if you had thickets of moss or similar plants it might work but the adults when hungry have no problem charging through the stuff after a morsel.

I'm hoping someone here breeds L. americanus.
 

buthus

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Great updates Buthus, would you be able to answer the feeding questions in my first post please? The number of nymphs you produced must be incredible. I'm guessing a few hundred.

I think raising the nymphs communally might be best. We know some weak ones are going to die, they might as well feed the ones that will make it. Currently out of 5 nymphs I put into a communal dishpan full of mozzies and scuds I think three are left.

I doubt the nymphs would last long in an adult tank unless you had some mechanical method of seperation. Perhaps if you had thickets of moss or similar plants it might work but the adults when hungry have no problem charging through the stuff after a morsel.

I'm hoping someone here breeds L. americanus.

Ive only fed the nymphs a few rounds ...mostly roach nymphs. I finally got around to feeding the ones I seperated ...roaches and a variety of other "bugs" ...earwigs, sows, spiders, beetles, etc. Adults will readily take anything thats half there size or smaller, but will take (hand fed )full grown lobster roaches.
The 2nd batch which is still with the adult have faired VERY well. Lots of cover though ...a mass of crab grass/roots. Im about to head out and buy a million and a half crickets for all my hungry killers. Hoping I will be able to keep one batch communally for at least awhile...just to test thoughs waters so to speak.

When you go out netting, show us what you come up with. I would love some other species (esp L.americanus)...and been hoping to get some water scorps.
I'd love to trade for or buy into some more fun. ;) If you are ever interested.
 

dtknow

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Thanks! what is the feeding schedule for the adults? Daily, weekly etc.


On the nymphs, a great live food that is free would be mosquito larvae. Just make sure you don't increase their population! The dishpan I mention actually had a population of mozzies and to put a stop to that in went the nymphs. They all got nailed as soon as they got big enough for the nymphs.

Scuds(gammarus) are also readily taken and can be collected/cultured.

I doubt I will find L. americanus,(CA also) but I do always keep my eyes open for big bugs. Someone in FL will have much better luck.
 

cacoseraph

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sweet dude!

i almost wonder if my toad bug is a baby one of those. guess that means i should take some pics and post 'em.
 

buthus

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sweet dude!

i almost wonder if my toad bug is a baby one of those. guess that means i should take some pics and post 'em.
As I was watching a few of the escapees hop aroun on the floor, I was thinking the same thing ...though your "toadbug" seemed a bit more speedy and agile on land ...at least thats what I remember. I hope its not the same thing ...cause I got plenty of these if you want some. :D

Twice weekly has been suggested, but mine rarely accept that much. I think they're old and lazy.
My adults ...esp theone that didnt have eggs, seem to eat and eat and eat. Ill have to ween them a bit, because I was having too much fun killing bugs. :D
 

Galapoheros

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Haha, "Toad Bugs".. I remember those hopping around on the edge of ponds. I find the water bugs in this thread every Spring when I'm dipping around looking for anything interesting. I usually just dump these out of the net but, since there seems to be some interest, I'll remember to hold on to them this time. I find a lot of other water bugs and beetles too like the Backboat swimmer type. I sometimes catch the big green diver beetles and the shiny big black ones. Sorry, I don't know the sci names of what I'm talking about. If I do get some, I'll hand them out cheap but I would at least want shipping costs and maybe a dollar or two. I'm guessing there wouldn't be a whole lot of people that would want one so, no big deal.
 
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