A. seemani odd behavior

MissHarlen

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
89
My SAF A. seemani is acting odd and I can't tell if it's premolt behavior or something else. She has dug out a burrow under her hide and walled off the entrance with webbing and substrate. She is not eating either. Her abdome is not showing the signs of premolt I'm used to (dark color, large) so I'm not sure she's in premolt. Any ideas?
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,026
Yes it is possible that it is premoult. Abdomens dont darken until the moult is imminent. It will spend a longer time in premoult as adult.
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
Joined
Sep 14, 2014
Messages
2,008
Could be pre-moult or just normal A seemanni behaviour.
A seemanni is one that loves to tunnel and burrow (even in captivity). Sometimes my adult will stay hidden in burrow for many weeks, and then suddenly -- she's topside again.
Yours sounds like a very normal A seemanni to me.
 

Tomoran

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Messages
239
I give my A. seemanni some depth to burrow, and she made a pretty elaborate tunnel. After a couple months, she filled in both entrances to the burrow and hunkered down below. About a month later, she opened up her burrow again and dragged out her molt. When my burrowing species cover their entrances in web or dirt, it's often a sign of premolt. They are done with eating for a while at this point, and the web/dirt is their way of putting up the "do not disturb" sign as they prepare for the molt. If yours has closed off the entrance, she may be doing the same. Keep water available and watch for the burrow to reopen. If it does, she might be ready to eat again.
 

MGery92

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
64
My A. seemanni is doing the same thing right now, and she molted one and a half month ago. She sealed her burrow, but I can see her through the sides. She is still plump and looks healthy, but her last meal was three weeks ago. I don't think she is in danger, as the others mentioned, they really like to hide in their burrows for long times.

However, if you could post some pictures of the T, that would be very helpful.
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,618
Sometimes it's not pre molt, I've had some burrowing species completely block off their entrance before only to resurface and take food again. I think they may close off their burrows as some kind of safety measure, that way if a predator is snooping around they go unnoticed.

I know this behavior is not always linked to pre molt, but luckily you have a NW so you can monitor the abdomen for any signs, my P.muticus kept doing this to me and it was confusing.

Sometimes if you aren't sure it's good to throw a feeder in and see if they eat, that gives you a more definitive answer, do you have a view inside the burrow? I would try and feed and if it refuses then leave it be and wait it out... could be molting soon or just isn't hungry.
 

JoshDM020

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
358
but luckily you have a NW so you can monitor the abdomen for any signs,
How do the abdomens vary between OW and NW that makes it easier to monitor in NW? I know the OW lack urticating setae, but is there more that i dont know of?
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,618
How do the abdomens vary between OW and NW that makes it easier to monitor in NW? I know the OW lack urticating setae, but is there more that i dont know of?
Well the OW abdomen's don't look any different in pre molt, they plump up but you can't really see the abdomen darkening as well. This is especially true with pokies, my large female regalis just molted on me by surprise, she was quite plump but there were no obvious pre molt signs other then her refusing food.

NWs often kick or drop hairs during the pre molt stage, this isn't always the case, but when they do it results in bald spots, these areas show the exposed exoskeleton and you can literally watch it gradually darken as the T approaches it's molt.
 
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