a question I could not find an answer to

magda

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
4
hello everybody!
my name is magda and i am planning to get a tarantula although I am still a bit scared! :) :8o I just hoped that you can give me some recommendations for a beginner species that
1) is not too defensive
2) has a rather weak venom
3) does not have urticating hairs
4) maybe is not too fast

Please do not laugh.;) I know that this sounds as if I want to get a cat or rabbit but as said before I am still a bit scared and would like to start with something "safe".
Is there a tarantula that can live up to these points or is it just impossible.
I would appreciate if somebody could help me with these questions.

Best wishes,
Magda
 

Darwinsdad

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 23, 2004
Messages
339
Once you place the qualification of not having urcticating hairs you pretty well dismantle all the other qualifications.
No hairs puts it in the old world species and most if not all of the O.W's are darn fast at least slightly defensive and have more potent venom.
 

Scorpendra

Arachnoprince
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Feb 16, 2005
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1,518
H. incei and Psalmopoeus spp. are New Worlds with no urticating hairs.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
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Unfortunately, looking for a docile, non bitey tarantula without urticating hairs is like seeking the holy grail. New World species are generally more docile and less likely to bite BECAUSE they have the urticating hairs. The hairs are their primary defense mechanism hence they are less likely to bolt or bite. Likewise Old World tarantulas (Asia, Africa, etc) have not evolved this defense mechanism and are usually faster, more likely to give a defensive bite or dash away and generally just feistier.

The hairs are not necessarily as bad as you might think. Sure they can itch but the trick is to not aggravate them into kicking the hairs in the first place. Move slowly and calmly. No loud noises or sudden movements. Learn to read their body language and respect their moods and you'll be fine. And wash your hands as soon as you get done doing anything in the tank whether you've touched the spider or not.

G roseas in particular are usually extremely docile. Also known as Chilean Rose or Rose Hair they are just about the best tarantula to start with. Quite affordable and resilient as well as docile. As with most animals however there are exceptions. I've heard a few stories where people say their rosea's are the nastiest spider they own. Personally, i have 2 and they are both teddy bears.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
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H. incei is a New World with no urticating hairs.

True. They're super speedy though and kinda pet-holish. They are quite beautiful though, like a big emerald with legs.
 

Mushroom Spore

Arachnoemperor
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Oct 14, 2005
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4,596
I'm surprised you couldn't find the answer to "what are some good beginner species," since there's a sticky thread in this very forum titled "Beginner Info" which is full of lists of such species. ;)

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=40987

Also, yeah, either you get something with urticating hairs OR get something with the other three undesired qualities in spades, you can't pick and choose that part.
 

harrypei

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Oct 30, 2006
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289
all Grammostola ssp should be good. they have urticating hairs but they never kick them...or at least the ones that i have :eek:
 

Mina

Arachnoking
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Oct 4, 2005
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Unfortunately I have to agree with everyone else. Any T that does not have the hairs has speed and more potent venom.
You need to look at a New World T. My suggestions are a Grammostola aureostriata or chaco golden knee, or a Brachypelma albopilosum or curlyhair, the Grammostola pulchra or Brazilian black are wonderful, but hard to find and expensive, almost anything in the Brachypelma genus would make a good first tarantula, most are reasonably priced and hardy.
There are also some wonderful native to the US species in the Aphonopelma genus and most of them are docile and would make a good first time pet. My favorites among them are Aphonopelma chalcodes or desert blonde, Aphonpelma anax or Texas tan, and Aphonopelma hentzi or Oklahoma brown.
Congratulations on your soon to be new best friend, and I hope that helped.
 

AubZ

Arachnoprince
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Your best bet is a G Rosea, as it never flicks hairs (well at least mine doesn't). Very Docile. Personally I'd go with the Red Color Form. Stunning T.
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
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Uricating hairs aren't as bad as everyone says they are, although you'll eventually develop some sort of sensitivity. This can take years, though. I still can't feel them and I've been keeping for a bit over a year.

Basically, if they don't have uricating hairs in any capacity expect them to be defensive.
 

arrowhd

Arachnolord
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Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
657
My suggestions are a Grammostola aureostriata or chaco golden knee, or a Brachypelma albopilosum or curlyhair, the Grammostola pulchra or Brazilian black are wonderful, but hard to find and expensive, almost anything in the Brachypelma genus would make a good first tarantula, most are reasonably priced and hardy.
My thoughts exactly.
 

Drachenjager

Arachnoemperor
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I was thinking of a T. blondi, they are very mild mannered and very seldom kick hairs... then again it may be that i am being sarcastic
 

icenola

Arachnopeon
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Jun 9, 2007
Messages
30
LoL..a bit? G Rosea, especially one about 3" or better more fun to start with and easier to fool with. Moves pretty slowly. Hairs nothing to sweat so don't worry bout it. Saw one in Petco that looked really nice once. Slings (those under an inch) a bit hard to start off with, they good at escaping. Stick with something larger.
 

Psych0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 28, 2007
Messages
28
My suggestion is not to buy G.rosea. It lacks more features as a first T than provides. OK its docile, and thats it. Starters want to see them eat but it doesn't. Starters want to see them molt often but it doesn't. and so on...

My suggestion is to buy a brachypelma emilia, albo or smithi sling. It wont take 4 years to became a real T.

Anyay you will buy 20 more after 2 months cause it's addicive:):):)
 

AubZ

Arachnoprince
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Starters want to see them eat but it doesn't. Starters want to see them molt often but it doesn't. and so on...

Anyay you will buy 20 more after 2 months cause it's addicive:):):)
Regards to eating - I am fortunate to own a Rosea that is different. I always see my Rosea eat & never get tired of it. She attacks her crix like an aggro T. Really cool.
Regards to Molting - You are right about that, mine has'nt molted in the 3 moths I've had her. They do grow slow.

Addiction - That's right, so I uess it doesn't matter what you start with cuz in a month you will have at least 5 T's. In my first 3 months I got 15 T's and that's only cuz of a lack of availabilty here. If I had the options you guys have, I would have about 50 +.
 

magda

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
4
thanks for all that answers!
maybe I should just clarify my fear or urticating hairs. :)
there are basically two reasons. the first one is that is that i once suffered from glass wool in my right eye and I almost lost eye-sight. and I read that those urticating hairs can cause severe damage to your eyes. so i am probably a bit oversensitive about that issue.
the second reason is that I am an athlete (running) and I am in a way afraid that I breathe in the urticating hairs swirling around in the room and that these have a negative efect on performance.
maybe some of you understand those fears! :) or just think I am a coward (which is true ;) )

magda
 

TheDarkFinder

Arachnoangel
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Dec 18, 2004
Messages
910
thanks for all that answers!
maybe I should just clarify my fear or urticating hairs. :)
there are basically two reasons. the first one is that is that i once suffered from glass wool in my right eye and I almost lost eye-sight. and I read that those urticating hairs can cause severe damage to your eyes. so i am probably a bit oversensitive about that issue.
the second reason is that I am an athlete (running) and I am in a way afraid that I breathe in the urticating hairs swirling around in the room and that these have a negative efect on performance.
maybe some of you understand those fears! :) or just think I am a coward (which is true ;) )

magda
I have taken a Lasiodora difficilis, one of the berry bonds of hair kickers, in the eye and yes it hurt but it did not kill me. I still can see. Most people forget to tell you that benadryl will stop the reaction. As for the lung thing, trust me you are inhaling far worst things right now. No do not huff your tarantula, but actually having the hairs floating around. Could happen, but then you could also keep them in container with a hepa filter.


As for your fears then maybe you should consider not owning a tarantula at all, no tarantula exist with out its problems. Every thing you do is going to have risks. Including owning a tarantula. The above species could work, but if you are going to live in fear, then just move on.
 

YouLosePayUp

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 17, 2005
Messages
844
If you really are that afraid of the urticating hairs, maybe you should consider an Old World bitey beast.

They can't kick hairs and most of them stay put and throw magnificent threat displays. That said there are some risks and usually not nice ones when a novice is concerned.

Given the proper distance and respect you would do fine with almost any of them.

Here's a few choices of Old World that are usually better choices than other old worlders:

Poecilotheria regalis - cheap and usually prefers to run instead of bite.
Eucratoscelus pachypus - is usually in the safety of it's burrow, but if it comes out will threat instead of chase.
Heteroscodra maculata - this is the wild card one. These are flighty arboreals that can be tricky to deal with, but they absolutely hate light. If you are scared of it until you get a better handle on things you can pretty much control it with a flashlight. Just one quick shine should be enough to drive it to it's retreat and you can do maintenance safely.

Tools needed to be safer:

6" + 12" tweezers

water dropper or similar so you can administer water from outside the tank

soft bristle paint brushes all different sizes (used for moving stubborn T's)

assortment of deli cups and other containers to house T's while doing cage cleanouts

P.S. you can PM me any other concerns and I can help you out with those as well
 
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