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Help! What to feed a baby common brown frog?

Discussion in 'Not So Spineless Wonders' started by MarcoVincelli, Jun 24, 2018.

  1. MarcoVincelli

    MarcoVincelli Arachnosquire

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    Will they eat dead or dried food? Looking for easy sources if possible, let me know!
     
  2. sschind

    sschind Arachnobaron Old Timer

    I'm not sure what a common brown frog is but I doubt they will eat anything that is not moving. Most anurans are sight predators and need movement to trigger the feeding response. You may get him to eat dead if you can move it around a bit with a long thing wire or piece of rigid plastic. The idea is to move the food without having too much of an intrusive presence that it frightens him so it should be pretty long but it has to be rigid enough to be able to move the item. Some frogs have a very strong feeding response and simply gently tossing the food item in front of them is enough to get them to eat.
     
  3. Liquifin

    Liquifin Arachnoknight Active Member

    I'm guessing you mean a Rana temporaria???? they are semi-aquatic and hibernate some time around October to February I think??? If it's wild caught, most likely won't eat anything dead. Sorry, I don't remember much about the frog hobby (I gave up on that hobby). But that's about what I can remember.
     
  4. MarcoVincelli

    MarcoVincelli Arachnosquire

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    Nevermind, sorry for the rush! Turns out to be a brown toad, very small. I’ve had success feeding it isopod babies.
     
  5. sschind

    sschind Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Isopods should work well but toads generally have a pretty good feeding response so you might get away with manually manipulating dead prey as well. The trick is to not get your hands too close to scare him.
     
  6. Beedrill

    Beedrill Arachnoknight

    I've had experience with larger toads, but the babies are the same. You shouldn't have any issue getting him to eat dead prey such as pre-killed crickets or roaches. Just wiggle them around sporadically and he shouldn't be able to resist. If he is wild caught, he may have some difficulties getting used to you, but given enough time, he should adapt to seeing you around meal times and such. Some species have even been observed following their owners as they walk by because they grow to expect food when they see you. If he's really small, like less than an inch, I would go with fruit flies or stick with the baby isopods until he puts on some size. You can get flightless fruit fly colonies for fairly cheap at Petsmart or Petco.

    I'm not sure that most toads will take dried/pellet food. As said above, they need to see some movement.

    Also, I would recommend dusting any food items with a calcium and vitamin supplement mix. While toads don't require the amount of calcium that reptiles do, they still need a good amount of it in most cases.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  7. MarcoVincelli

    MarcoVincelli Arachnosquire

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    Thanks :)
     
  8. MikeofBorg

    MikeofBorg Arachnosquire

    Make sure you powder the feeders with calcium supplement. They get a more varied diet in the wild which provides them calcium. In captivity feeders don’t have enough calcium to keep a toad healthy. Mostly because we only feed them a few different types of feeders with crickets being the favorite. Crickets lack a lot of nutrients that amphibians need. I lost a Anaxyrus americanus (formerly Bufo americanus) as a teenager because of calcium deficiency.