Would a pet snake or tarantula be better?

The Amazing Me

Arachnopeon
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Apr 1, 2017
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35
What pet should I get. Snakes could tolerate more handling while tarantulas really can't be handled but they are cheapier. Which in your opinion is better
 

Andrea82

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I think that depends on the T or snake which has your preference...;)
 

leaveittoweaver

Arachnoknight
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May 7, 2009
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Depends. Do you want something you can handle? Get a snake then. If low maintenance and cost is more important to you, get a tarantula.
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
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They literally couldn't be any different. If you want a snake get a snake. If you want a T get a T.

Either way do your homework and research, research, research. Anything you're unsure about ask on here.

Just remember though that cute little burm or retic will get BIG (unless the retic is a super dwarf). I know you haven't specified either of those snakes but it's just a little warning.
 

GingerC

Arachnosquire
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Feb 10, 2017
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117
It depends on what species of snake you want, what species of T you want, and what you're willing to put up with. But here's a general list of snake traits:

-Snakes need a larger, more complicated setup than a T
-They can be handled and you can boop their snoots
-Their food never chirps at night and is pretty convenient, but dead mice are gross; sometimes made more appealing by popping the brain case or rubbing them in litter, and also they can leak when you thaw them out. Live mice could be a pain to deal with if your snake is suddenly off food for some reason, and also you can form an emotional attachment to them.
-Snakes are lazy and they don't do much, but they do a heck of a lot more than a T

Here's some T traits:

-They hate everything. If tarantulas were cartoon characters, they'd be the grumpy old man always shouting at kids to get off his lawn. Whether you find their temper tantrums endearing or not is all up to you. :D
-They are extremely boring sometimes. If you only have one T, that's like having a pet rock. That's why most members here have 10+ Ts, so at least there's always something going on.
-Cannot be handled unless you want a face full of setae
-Extremely cheap to set up, easy to care for, and highly collectible...
-....except that you have to deal with crickets, and those are the absolute worst, filthiest, moldy, rotten disease burritos that make it their mission to infect their entire population with any virus or parasite that comes their way. They also smell bad and make a lot of noise. If you buy crickets frivolously and excessively, you tend not to run into these problems, but they're still disgusting.
 

Chris LXXIX

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To reduce the whole thing to 'handling' is a bit sad on my book... not even mention, like basin79 said, that we are talking about completely different animals.

Like comparing a car (no matter which) to a boat (no matter which, again).
 

basin79

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It depends on what species of snake you want, what species of T you want, and what you're willing to put up with. But here's a general list of snake traits:

-Snakes need a larger, more complicated setup than a T
-They can be handled and you can boop their snoots
-Their food never chirps at night and is pretty convenient, but dead mice are gross; sometimes made more appealing by popping the brain case or rubbing them in litter, and also they can leak when you thaw them out. Live mice could be a pain to deal with if your snake is suddenly off food for some reason, and also you can form an emotional attachment to them.
-Snakes are lazy and they don't do much, but they do a heck of a lot more than a T

Here's some T traits:

-They hate everything. If tarantulas were cartoon characters, they'd be the grumpy old man always shouting at kids to get off his lawn. Whether you find their temper tantrums endearing or not is all up to you. :D
-They are extremely boring sometimes. If you only have one T, that's like having a pet rock. That's why most members here have 10+ Ts, so at least there's always something going on.
-Cannot be handled unless you want a face full of setae
-Extremely cheap to set up, easy to care for, and highly collectible...
-....except that you have to deal with crickets, and those are the absolute worst, filthiest, moldy, rotten disease burritos that make it their mission to infect their entire population with any virus or parasite that comes their way. They also smell bad and make a lot of noise. If you buy crickets frivolously and excessively, you tend not to run into these problems, but they're still disgusting.

There are a multitude of snakes that are extremely active.

Opheodrys aestivus (rough green tree snake) are insect eaters taking crickets etcetera. Fantastic if you're not happy with having to buy vertebrates.
 

awiec

Arachnoprince
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Feb 13, 2014
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1,329
Depends on your budget, resources and what you want out of an animal. I have both reptiles (including a snake) and tarantulas and some of my tarantulas are more active than my reptiles and are more noticeable when I go to check on them. Granted I do have a sand boa but he occasionally comes out at night, though if I want to check up on him I do need to dig him up. I prefer frozen mice to crickets as they don't smell really unless your snake decides to not eat it and he doesn't hate my guts unlike the tarantulas. If you just want something pretty to look at with minimal costs, then a spider is the way to go. If you want something that can develop a relationship with you and are willing to put in the time and money to care for them than a snake is what you want. As for easy to care for snakes I will always recommend a sank boa even though they aren't visible all the time as they are simple to keep and very friendly. Corns and milk snakes are more sizable snakes but are also easy to keep and are probably more visible.
 

CWilson1351

Arachnobaron
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Jan 23, 2017
Messages
454
I have two snakes and 7 tarantulas, personally I find the Ts easier, but I love my Rainbow Boa more than all my Ts combined. Sacrilege on this site, I know.

Like everyone else has said, it comes down to your personal preferences. There are plenty of snakes that you shouldn't handle just like a tarantula. No tarantulas you can or should handle. Feeders, same thing everyone has said. Crickets are vile. Frozen/thawed or any pre-killed mouse/rat is less so IMO.
 

jreidsma

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Mar 27, 2012
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318
I have four sand boas, and I have to say that one of them is actually very active. The biggest one, which is a regular colored female, is around 250 grams (so pretty much adult size) and runs around the tank all the time. She has plenty of everything, but still does it. The smallest is a regular colored male, and he is probably the second most active. Also the most laid back when it comes to handling. The anery colored male squirms whenever you try to dig him up, and he is not active above the sand at all. While the anery female sits still once dug up, and comes out every once and a while.

In the end, they are all extremely calm. The sand boas stay pretty small for snakes to.

This doesn't mean that my 12 or so tarantulas are worse in any way. Having a bunch of fuzz balls is incredibly adorable. I say get one and then get the other after a while ;) if only one is possible, then I go with what everyone else says. Interaction vs maintenance.
 

Andrea82

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Re: feeding Theraphosids....you don't HAVE to feed crickets. You can feed mealworms, superworms, dubia roaches, red runners, banana roaches, locusts. All of these don't smell and don't make a sound.
I love snakes, and I would be thrilled if I could own one, but I just can't deal with feeding mice or rats or baby chicks. So no snakes for me....
 

Venom1080

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want to handle: Snake
dont care to handle: Tarantula

its all personal preference. and budget..
 

basin79

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Re: feeding Theraphosids....you don't HAVE to feed crickets. You can feed mealworms, superworms, dubia roaches, red runners, banana roaches, locusts. All of these don't smell and don't make a sound.
I love snakes, and I would be thrilled if I could own one, but I just can't deal with feeding mice or rats or baby chicks. So no snakes for me....
Like I already typed. Have a look at Opheodrys aestivus (rough green tree snake). They eat crickets. Could be the ideal solution for you.
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
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Jun 12, 2016
Messages
556
Late to the party, but this wasn't mentioned. When you walk into the room and there is a snake, you can smell it (even with a clean enclosure). When you walk into a room and there is a tarantula, there is no smell. Crickets, unless maintained in the room don't count, lol.
 

OliverWhatever

Arachnosquire
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Sep 14, 2015
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60
Late to the party, but this wasn't mentioned. When you walk into the room and there is a snake, you can smell it (even with a clean enclosure). When you walk into a room and there is a tarantula, there is no smell. Crickets, unless maintained in the room don't count, lol.
Been considering getting a snake now that they are finally about to be legal in Norway, but I've never heard anyone say anything about their smell. Is it in any way unpleasant? Something you wouldn't want in your living room?
 

basin79

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Been considering getting a snake now that they are finally about to be legal in Norway, but I've never heard anyone say anything about their smell. Is it in any way unpleasant? Something you wouldn't want in your living room?
It depends. I used to keep retics and you could smell them. However I also used to keep a GTP and an ETB and they're not smelly unless they've let go of a chocolate hostage.

Big snakes "smell" more due to what they let go. Small snakes are not an issue. You'd smell a cat or a dog before the snake.
 
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