Worse sling ever kept?

MetallicArachnid

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Jan 22, 2016
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Right now it's my N. tripepii. I've heard they're fast growers but mine has been anything but...no molts yet, barely eats, and I never see it because it constructed an underground labyrinth. Which stinks because it's one of the Ts I was most excited to own...
Never had a Nhandu that grew quickly, my carapoensis has grown less than 1/4 inch in a year.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
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Oct 2, 2016
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N. chromatus. little stinker wont eat or grow. I had it in a deli cup for a long time and finally moved it into a smaller condiment cup, I though this would help it feel more secure and it might eat but nope. :/ even my brachy sling is growing faster than this one. :confused:
Drives me nuts. I was torn when I bought my tripepii because I wanted the whole genus at the time...almost bought N. chromatus instead of my A. geniculata. At this rate my geniculata will be full-grown by the time my tripepii molts for the first time in my care :shifty:

Never had a Nhandu that grew quickly, my carapoensis has grown less than 1/4 inch in a year.
Why are we all under the impression they're fast growers?!
 

cold blood

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Tapinauchenius gigas!!!!

I've had this sling since like, late November last year and it has eaten (and tackled live prey as well) often... enough... but it hasn't molted, hasn't grown, no nothing. It's pretty tiny too. :/
Interesting seeing as how Taps are regarded as the fastest growing genus known to man.

Right now it's my N. tripepii. I've heard they're fast growers but mine has been anything but...no molts yet, barely eats, and I never see it because it constructed an underground labyrinth. Which stinks because it's one of the Ts I was most excited to own...
What???? My 3 eat like total beasts, and are molting every 26-30 days...I got them in December as slings of about 1/2", they've all molted 2 or 3 times and the smallest is already over an inch...the largest is 1.25"

N. chromatus. little stinker wont eat or grow. I had it in a deli cup for a long time and finally moved it into a smaller condiment cup, I though this would help it feel more secure and it might eat but nope. :/ even my brachy sling is growing faster than this one. :confused:
Just as crazy as the above tripeppii.:wacky: I've raised about 50 of these, and had exactly 3 slow growers as slings, the rest all molted about every 24-28 days until well over an inch....but even those few runts always ate well, they just exhibited less growth per molt.

Never had a Nhandu that grew quickly, my carapoensis has grown less than 1/4 inch in a year.

I'm amazed, Nhandu has, for me, been by far the most consistently fast growing terrestrial genus I have kept. In my house theyre like Psalms, eating or preparing to molt. In fact I have the genus in my "favorite slings to raise" list, for the exact opposite reasons people are sighting here...hilarious...I wonder is its just possible that Nhandu slings really show a preference for warmer temps, as my room is about 80 most of the year.
^^this tripeppii was just 27 days from its last molt.


^^freshly moilted as usual.:)
 

MetallicArachnid

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Jan 22, 2016
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Drives me nuts. I was torn when I bought my tripepii because I wanted the whole genus at the time...almost bought N. chromatus instead of my A. geniculata. At this rate my geniculata will be full-grown by the time my tripepii molts for the first time in my care :shifty:


Why are we all under the impression they're fast growers?!
Yeah I don't know maybe it is that they prefer warmer temps like cold blood suggested.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
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Interesting seeing as how Taps are regarded as the fastest growing genus known to man.



What???? My 3 eat like total beasts, and are molting every 26-30 days...I got them in December as slings of about 1/2", they've all molted 2 or 3 times and the smallest is already over an inch...the largest is 1.25"



Just as crazy as the above tripeppii.:wacky: I've raised about 50 of these, and had exactly 3 slow growers as slings, the rest all molted about every 24-28 days until well over an inch....but even those few runts always ate well, they just exhibited less growth per molt.




I'm amazed, Nhandu has, for me, been by far the most consistently fast growing terrestrial genus I have kept. In my house theyre like Psalms, eating or preparing to molt. In fact I have the genus in my "favorite slings to raise" list, for the exact opposite reasons people are sighting here...hilarious...I wonder is its just possible that Nhandu slings really show a preference for warmer temps, as my room is about 80 most of the year.
^^this tripeppii was just 27 days from its last molt.


^^freshly moilted as usual.:)
Let's see. I got my tripepii at the NE expo which was in mid-January. It looked like it was ready to go into premolt. Ate like a champ for about a month and then stopped...didn't eat for about 3 weeks and ate again for the first time the day before yesterday. Unless she molted without me seeing and gained no size (which I doubt), she is overdue according to your schedule. I keep her about 75 degrees. It's just not feasible for me to keep it in the 80s in the winter since I live in a studio apartment and they don't have their own designated room. But my next Nhandu I will get, I will keep much warmer to compare.
 

Andrea82

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E. campestratus.
It came as a 2i freebie with my very first online order of Ts and I was absolutely NOT ready for it. I unwrapped it and had a panic attack. Then I proceded to house it in a much to large box where it prompty burried itself, never ate and never grew... well, nearly never. It did grow eventually, but it took years off my life in stress.
Why weren't you ready for E.campestratus, the size? Your post surprised me since they are docile as can be...
 

cold blood

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Let's see. I got my tripepii at the NE expo which was in mid-January. It looked like it was ready to go into premolt. Ate like a champ for about a month and then stopped...didn't eat for about 3 weeks and ate again for the first time the day before yesterday. Unless she molted without me seeing and gained no size (which I doubt), she is overdue according to your schedule. I keep her about 75 degrees. It's just not feasible for me to keep it in the 80s in the winter since I live in a studio apartment and they don't have their own designated room. But my next Nhandu I will get, I will keep much warmer to compare.
I would think 75 would be just fine. I can't say that I have ever had any Nhandu sling fast for 3 weeks...maybe 1 week is the longest, and it always ends with a molt.
 

boina

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Why weren't you ready for E.campestratus, the size? Your post surprised me since they are docile as can be...
Yes, but that thing was tiny! And up to that point I had kept only adults and larger juveniles... he was my 4th T and I really had no clue what to do with this dot with legs.
 

Andrea82

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Yes, but that thing was tiny! And up to that point I had kept only adults and larger juveniles... he was my 4th T and I really had no lue what to do with this dot with legs.
Thanks for clearing that up! I can relate, got a D.pentaloris as a freebie a while ago...it was like you said, a dot with legs. I thought the seller pulled a prank on me, but
then i saw something moving :D
 

YagerManJennsen

Arachnobaron
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Jan 3, 2016
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Interesting seeing as how Taps are regarded as the fastest growing genus known to man.



What???? My 3 eat like total beasts, and are molting every 26-30 days...I got them in December as slings of about 1/2", they've all molted 2 or 3 times and the smallest is already over an inch...the largest is 1.25"



Just as crazy as the above tripeppii.:wacky: I've raised about 50 of these, and had exactly 3 slow growers as slings, the rest all molted about every 24-28 days until well over an inch....but even those few runts always ate well, they just exhibited less growth per molt.




I'm amazed, Nhandu has, for me, been by far the most consistently fast growing terrestrial genus I have kept. In my house theyre like Psalms, eating or preparing to molt. In fact I have the genus in my "favorite slings to raise" list, for the exact opposite reasons people are sighting here...hilarious...I wonder is its just possible that Nhandu slings really show a preference for warmer temps, as my room is about 80 most of the year.
^^this tripeppii was just 27 days from its last molt.


^^freshly moilted as usual.:)
My T room is always right around 70, maybe keeping it warmer would stimulate it's appetite. Though nearly everyone else is eating and rowing just fine.
 

boina

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I wonder is its just possible that Nhandu slings really show a preference for warmer temps, as my room is about 80 most of the year.:)
Can't be that alone. My Nhandus (chromatus/carapoensis) have been growing reasonably fast - not as fast as yours, since they are kept at lower temps, especially in winter, but they eat great and have molted in a consistent 6-8 week rhythm until juvenile. And I tend to oversize their containers a bit, too, but they didn't care, they just ate and molted. But they did fast like 3 weeks before a molt in winter at about 72 degrees - they just had a longer premolt at that temp, but in summer, at 75+ F they just stuffed themselves and molted a week or 10 days later.
 

Jeff23

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I really don't have any slings that I would say are bad ones based on species. I love raising slings so most aspects of the process are a lot of fun for me regardless of growth rates or maintenance needed. But I did make a mistake myself.

I bought several Cyriocosmus leetzi in 1/8" - 1/4" size. I guess when you order a really small tarantula and you are inexperienced you don't realize how small it is until you get it. I currently have five 5.5 oz deli cups that I have been maintaining moisture and providing cricket pieces to for four months and I haven't seen these slings since I released them. Since they are so small, I suppose they haven't burrowed up next to the plastic yet. I am hoping that I can see one of them soon or I suppose I will be going on a digging expedition into one of the cups.
 

EulersK

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That's funny, because of all the Brachypelma I have raised, my B. smithi was the fastest grower and best eater....lol She's like 5" and maybe 4 years old.
What about B. vagans? So far, my B. smithi's aren't exactly fast growing. I've had a sling for the better part of half a year. In the same amount of time, my B. vagans have become decently sized juvies.
 

user 666

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Since we are talking about slings, I have a question on care.

I am thinking of getting a few quarter-inch arboreal Ts. Should I house them like arboreals (climbing room but little substrate) or like terrestrials (a hide plus lots of substrate for burrows)?

My slightly larger arboreals (1" to 2") are housed with enough substrate that they can burrow if they want. Does the same apply to all sul-adult arboreals?
 

cold blood

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What about B. vagans? So far, my B. smithi's aren't exactly fast growing. I've had a sling for the better part of half a year. In the same amount of time, my B. vagans have become decently sized juvies.
Until 1+", my vagans have always grown glacially...real similar to albiceps...although once they get over that 1-1.25" hump, they grow like mad...but as slings, a total PITA IMO.

I think any time you get a Brachy you could get a glacially slow grower, or a faster grower, seems pretty random almost with the genus.
 

Jeff23

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Since we are talking about slings, I have a question on care.

I am thinking of getting a few quarter-inch arboreal Ts. Should I house them like arboreals (climbing room but little substrate) or like terrestrials (a hide plus lots of substrate for burrows)?

My slightly larger arboreals (1" to 2") are housed with enough substrate that they can burrow if they want. Does the same apply to all sul-adult arboreals?
What species in particular?

I use 32 oz deli cup with about an inch of substrate and a slab of cork bark along with some type of plastic plant in mine. But if it is certain Psalmopoeus species I may up the substrate to slightly more. If it is an Avic I don't put anything close to the lid (else it will keep trying to web up the lid).
 

cold blood

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Since we are talking about slings, I have a question on care.

I am thinking of getting a few quarter-inch arboreal Ts. Should I house them like arboreals (climbing room but little substrate) or like terrestrials (a hide plus lots of substrate for burrows)?

My slightly larger arboreals (1" to 2") are housed with enough substrate that they can burrow if they want. Does the same apply to all sul-adult arboreals?
yeah, knowing the species is critical to any help you receive.
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
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What species in particular?

I use 32 oz deli cup with about an inch of substrate and a slab of cork bark along with some type of plastic plant in mine. But if it is certain Psalmopoeus species I may up the substrate to slightly more. If it is an Avic I don't put anything close to the lid (else it will keep trying to web up the lid).
I don't know, yet.

What i would like to do is build a "show case" arboreal enclosure in the smallest Hobby Lobby display case:
http://www.hobbylobby.com/Crafts-Hobbies/Model-Kits/Display-Cases/6-Piece-Display-Case-Pack/p/903

But I can't do it until I know that it can house a T safely in it (else, why even bother).
 

Jeff23

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I don't know, yet.

What i would like to do is build a "show case" arboreal enclosure in the smallest Hobby Lobby display case:
http://www.hobbylobby.com/Crafts-Hobbies/Model-Kits/Display-Cases/6-Piece-Display-Case-Pack/p/903

But I can't do it until I know that it can house a T safely in it (else, why even bother).
Hobby Lobby has some cases that are in great sizes for arboreal T's. But when you turn it vertical it requires more modifications versus use for terrestrial. TarantulaSam has some good videos on the mods.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8dYzbbuNgrLqlJY-anJnrA/videos
 

BMQ

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Yeah I never got why people say the smithis are "excrutiatingly slow growers" five or six years is NOT THAT LONG. Okay, yeah, it's really long, but the fastest growers usually take like two or three years apparently, so it's not that much *longer
I don't know if I've been lucky, but all of my smithis have grown pretty quick. They have almost tripled in size in about a year and a half. They were about the size of a silver dollar when I got them, 18 months later they are about the size diameter of the average CD disc from tip to tip. Maybe 2 inches to almost 4 3/4 inches.
 
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