Wolf Spider, Ray City Georgia USA

MadMan24

Arachnopeon
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20210331_214307.jpg

Hey guys. This is my first post here. Just curious if anyone is familiar with wolf spider species. I found this guy and several females in my back yard. Successfully paired him with one female and the other females have egg sacs. Just curious if anyone knows what species exactly this is? I was thinking Hogna of some sort at first, but think I may be wrong now. They are about the size of a quarter leg span wise.

20210331_213724.jpg

A picture of one of the pairings I tried unsuccessfully. But this girl was already gravid and had an egg sac a few days later.
 
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viper69

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View attachment 382148

Hey guys. This is my first post here. Just curious if anyone is familiar with wolf spider species. I found this guy and several females in my back yard. Successfully paired him with one female and the other females have egg sacs. Just curious if anyone knows what species exactly this is? I was thinking Hogna of some sort at first, but think I may be wrong now. They are about the size of a half dollar leg span wise.
So you don’t know the species.

Then why did you breed them, and potentially make hybrids? FrankenSpiders not good.
 

MadMan24

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Because they were all found within ten or 15 feet from one another in my back yard. If there were any hybridization going on, it would have been in my back yard long before I attempted to breed them inside. FYI, hybridization does indeed occur in the wild anyways between closely related species whose regions overlap. I do understand your concern, however. I also appreciate your reply. :)
 

viper69

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Because they were all found within ten or 15 feet from one another in my back yard. If there were any hybridization going on, it would have been in my back yard long before I attempted to breed them inside. FYI, hybridization does indeed occur in the wild anyways between closely related species whose regions overlap. I do understand your concern, however. I also appreciate your reply. :)
Proximity doesn’t mean they are the same species. I find jumpers on the same plant or tree and they are not the same species.

I’m aware of hybridization FYI

Do you have proof this or these species hybridize?

If not - not a good idea.
You’ve made a lot of assumptions from what I’ve read so far.
 

MadMan24

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Do you or do you not know the exact species in the picture? I have tried to be polite while you on the other hand have not. There are plenty of trolls and jerks online. We do not need another one. So, either help me or post on someone else's post.
 

Edan bandoot

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Proximity doesn’t mean they are the same species. I find jumpers on the same plant or tree and they are not the same species.

I’m aware of hybridization FYI

Do you have proof this or these species hybridize?

If not - not a good idea.
You’ve made a lot of assumptions from what I’ve read so far.
If they're found within 10-15 meters in the wild and are able to then it's likely this spider is already a hybrid.

But I've never heard of true spiders hybridizing
 

MadMan24

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I do apologize as well for my brash comment. It was not necessary. Hope to find the help I need.
 

viper69

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and are able to
Except the OP doesn't actually know this.

I do apologize as well for my brash comment. It was not necessary. Hope to find the help I need.
I don't take words on a screen personally from someone I don't know. You suggesting I'm a jerk or troll, is your opinion only. You are entitled to it. If you don't like my answers you have 2 choices
1. Don't post.
2. Put me on ignore.
 

The Snark

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@MadMan24 Don't let the pedants get you down. Back to your original question, unless you get lucky, the pictures alone won't be enough to go on. Maybe this or that. An awful lot of lycosids out there. If you can get additional circumstantial data such as burrow and native habitat it would help. A full life cycle would also give us a leg up in the ID.
Nice pics BTW. As compared to the usual shots we see which, if you squint and use a little imagination can be ball-parked as an arachnid.
 

MadMan24

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@MadMan24 Don't let the pedants get you down. Back to your original question, unless you get lucky, the pictures alone won't be enough to go on. Maybe this or that. An awful lot of lycosids out there. If you can get additional circumstantial data such as burrow and native habitat it would help. A full life cycle would also give us a leg up in the ID.
Nice pics BTW. As compared to the usual shots we see which, if you squint and use a little imagination can be ball-parked as an arachnid.

Thank you! I have noticed since with me, they have dug extensive burrows and hang out in them for days on end. Only coming out once hungry. They dont web up their burrows at all, however. I can actually see the burrows from beneath their enclosure. I may try to get a shot of that just to share. From what I can observe in my yard, they prefer a woodland type habitat. I rarely find them far from the shaded leaf covered corner of my yard, which connects to my neighbors wooded property.
 

The Snark

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@MadMan24 Pretty typical burrows. And yes, they live in and utilize the detritus as both hunting grounds and defense. They aren't obligate nocturnal but you may find them more active, interested in hunting, when it's dark. You should give them a proper day-night cycle anyway to help them keep their internal clock adjusted.
 

Penn

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These do look in the ball park of Hogna. Any chance you could get a picture of the underside of one of them?

And there is no need to worry about hybridization when you found these guys right next to each other. If these guys are compatible physically, behaviorally and chromosomally, you would likely have little hybrids running around your yard already. And that's assuming they are indeed different species.

Proximity doesn’t mean they are the same species. I find jumpers on the same plant or tree and they are not the same species.

I’m aware of hybridization FYI

Do you have proof this or these species hybridize?

If not - not a good idea.
You’ve made a lot of assumptions from what I’ve read so far.
These look to be both in the Hogna genus and are likely the same species. More pictures would need to be provided to confirm.

As these spiders are in no way rare or hard to come by, an experimental pairing between individuals found within a couple yards from each other that are physically similar is hardly something to get worked up over. Even if they are not the same species, the odds of them being compatible and not already hybridizing in the wild are low. And if they can't hybridize, oh well.
 
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MadMan24

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These do look in the ball park of Hogna. Any chance you could get a picture of the underside of one of them?
This is admittedly not very good. I am going to try to get better pictures later. Hope this helps! 20210419_193327.jpg 20210419_193310.jpg

They are bigger than a quarter as well. This container is 2 inches and when flat, this male touches all sides.

I'm leaning towards hogna lenta myself, but not entirely sure. Lol
 
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Penn

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I'm leaning towards hogna lenta myself, but not entirely sure. Lol
Same, but I want to find an identification key to confirm. Lycosids are a pain. Definitely not carolinensis is all I can say at the moment.
 

Ungoliant

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Seconding Hogna lenta -- I've found lots of these in my yard.

mature male


mature female


mating pair (not the same individuals as above)
 
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