Why is my sling hyperactive?

Nandi

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 30, 2017
Messages
40
I've got a new sling on Thuesday, 2" legspan. I took him into a bigger terrarium instead of a small plastic cage because I had this enclosure free now and the sling isn't too small for it in my opinion. I equipped it simply, just peat and a big rock to make feeding easy. She can find his meal, eating well but she is constantly moving around, climbing in the glass and walking. Is it okay? Is she looking for a shelter to hide? Should I take in a shelter?
Phormictopus sp. green
 

boina

Lady of the mites
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
2,205
It absolutely definitely NEEDS a hide! ESPECIALLY if it's in a bigger enclosure. Otherwise it's terribly stressed because it constantly fears for it's life. It may tire itself running around until it's weak and sick. Does it have at least enough substrate to burrow? What's the rock for?
 

Hellblazer

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 13, 2016
Messages
134
Take the rock out, especially if it's climbing the walls a lot. It could fall on it and die.
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,611
Get yourself a piece of cork bark, and cover it with a little substrate. Next step is to slightly dig a crevasse, or a starter burrow and I'm sure your T will take to it.

Generally the larger the enclosure the more stressed your spider will be, especially without a hide. It may also just be getting used to its new home, and exploring the enclosure. Hopefully it's not an open space and you supplied some cover so your T can feel secure.
Take the rock out, especially if it's climbing the walls a lot. It could fall on it and die.
As he pointed out, that rock may be a hazard, it could also attempt to dig a burrow under the rock and get crushed in the process. Better safe then sorry.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
Generally the larger the enclosure the more stressed your spider will be, especially without a hide.
This is partially, factually wrong. A T in a setup without proper hiding areas can be stressed out, as they feel they are out in the open. This can happen in small containers as well. Even my 32 oz deli cups, if barren, will make an Avic withdraw its legs.

The statement I quoted also doesn't make logical sense from a wild life perspective either. Wild Ts live in the largest "container" in the world ;) They don't even know that hah.

What is critical regardless of container size is that the container provide the proper cage furniture so that the animal feels safe. Be it a small container, or keeping a T inside a 100 gallon container.
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,611
This is partially, factually wrong. A T in a setup without proper hiding areas can be stressed out, as they feel they are out in the open. This can happen in small containers as well.
That's why I used the word "generally" it's not a factual statement as there is no real definitive evidence to back it up, only our observations. However, from what I've experienced, they do not feel like they are out in the open when housed in deli cups. The deli cups themselves act as an enclosed area, thus allowing the animal to feel safe. This is why hobbyists keep slings in them. They definetely help the spiders acclimate to their new homes faster... at least that's what I've observed.

Of course I can't prove wether or not they would be more or less stressed, but they will be worse off in a huge barren aquarium then in a small barren deli cup. I think it has more to do with them establishing a safe zone, and hides provide that enclosed area the same way a deli cup would.
What is critical regardless of container size is that the container provide the proper cage furniture so that the animal feels safe. Be it a small container, or keeping a T inside a 100 gallon container.
My point is that they need an enclosed space to feel secure. The deli cup does provide that, unless your slings are too small then house them in a pill jar. Maybe this is the issue with your avic...
 

D Sherlod

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
222
My understanding of a smaller container or encloser was to make it easier for the T to find prey.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong:happy:
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
My understanding of a smaller container or encloser was to make it easier for the T to find prey.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong:happy:
Yeah. But I also add:

- IMO it's better for prevent escapes (I've saw here slings housed in KK and they managed to 'papillon' the hell out via the air holes. Logical).

- IMO with certain species working in little helps better with mantaining the humidity parameters certain Asian/Tropical require.
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
709
My understanding of a smaller container or encloser was to make it easier for the T to find prey.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong:happy:
The way I look at it is this:

They're basically blind. Their eyes are more like light sensors than anything. If YOU were blind, and got almost all of your information from feeling around, would you prefer to live in a stadium, or a small house? I'd take the small house...much easier to figure out where everything is and not get lost. I know tarantulas don't have the brain to think about this, but it still makes good sense to me.
 

boina

Lady of the mites
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
2,205
Smaller containers serve many purposes. Finding prey is the most cited for some reason. However, it also helps the sling feel safe. As
@nicodimus22 already said they are blind for all practical purposes. In nature they would hide, but not in a wide open field, but between sticks and grasses and rocks and wood and whatever. A wide open field makes them vulnerable to every predator around and of course they "know" that by instinct. A small container means they can feel shelter at every side - they are safe. In a large, barren enclosure their instinct to hide can overpower every other instinct. A lot of slings will not eat well, or they will pull their legs up, or they will run around to exhaustion. A larger enclosure can work if it's full of clutter - but then of course, there are a lot of hiding places, not only for the sling but also for the prey. I think that's why the problem gets often reduced to the *finding prey* problem.
 
Top