Why did my T die?

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
So, I have two or rather had two OBTs and they are in the same tank. My husband and I converted a 10 gallon tank into 3 enclosures. I feed all my babies at the same time, give them water once a week (changing it as needed) and remoisturize tries the substrate when needed and he died. RIP Tigger. I just found it odd that the other is fine and he wasnt. Anyone have something similar happen or any ideas as to what went wrong? He didnt have a bad molt or anything. Just gone Thanks in advance for the help!
 

dangerforceidle

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
728
Do you happen to have a photo of the enclosure, how it was set up? Do you have a photo of the spider? How long have you had him (and was he a confirmed male)?
 

vancwa

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2011
Messages
192
As above, please give pics of the enclosure in its entirety along with the T's. We can better help you. Will say, P. murinus needs dry sub. Also, a single enclosure made into multiple is asking for trouble. One T could bolt into the other with deadly results.
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
Do you happen to have a photo of the enclosure, how it was set up? Do you have a photo of the spider? How long have you had him (and was he a confirmed male)?
No, all I have is feeding videos of "him" eating but I still have him in a cup. Couldnt bring myself to just throw him away ya know. Below are pictures of him (deceased) and the tank. It only happened about a week ago. I was heartbroken when it happened so I didnt even look at him until I just took this picture. I fed them every two weeks and kept the substrate moist but not soaking wet. His abdomen is shrunken. Is that normal for Ts when they die? I had him for almost two years and he wasnt even fully mature yet.
 

Attachments

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
As above, please give pics of the enclosure in its entirety along with the T's. We can better help you. Will say, P. murinus needs dry sub. Also, a single enclosure made into multiple is asking for trouble. One T could bolt into the other with deadly results.
As above, please give pics of the enclosure in its entirety along with the T's. We can better help you. Will say, P. murinus needs dry sub. Also, a single enclosure made into multiple is asking for trouble. One T could bolt into the other with deadly results.
Haha funny you should say that cuz it happened. It was certainly scary but not deadly as the other T was just about as scared as I was lol he ran as far away as he could. So we fixed that problem and they were fine houses next to each other for about 6 months.
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
That setup is not appropriate for that species.
Okay well I had him for two years and he was fine so I think it was okay for him. He was in a smaller container before I rehoused him and it was setup almost the same way. That's a top view btw. He was in it for 6 months and the other OBT is thriving and it's the exact same setup.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,315
2 years....your dead one is likely a mature male that died of old age.....flip it on its back and get a pic of the underside of the palps
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
2 years....your dead one is likely a mature male that died of old age.....flip it on its back and get a pic of the underside of the palps
It was only like 2 or 3 inches long tho? Wouldn't it be bigger if it were mature? That's the best I could get of the underside. Hes all curled up.
 

Attachments

dangerforceidle

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
728
It was only like 2 or 3 inches long tho? Wouldn't it be bigger if it were mature?
Not this species, no (and Harpactirinae sub-family, really). Some adult males may be larger, but they mature quite small.

They can also hatch, mature, and pass of old age in under 2 years.
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
Not this species, no (and Harpactirinae sub-family, really). Some adult males may be larger, but they mature quite small.

They can also hatch, mature, and pass of old age in under 2 years.
Oh wow I had no idea! My other is a pet hole but i saw it today. Could her being alive give me hope that it could be a female? They came from the same egg sack.
 

Ghost56

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
441
It was only like 2 or 3 inches long tho? Wouldn't it be bigger if it were mature? That's the best I could get of the underside. Hes all curled up.
He's a mature male. I noticed you said you remoisten the substrate though. Once these are past the sling stage, they prefer/need it bone dry.
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
He's a mature male. I noticed you said you remoisten the substrate though. Once these are past the sling stage, they prefer/need it bone dry.
Oh man. That makes me feel a little better I guess. How are you so positive he was a mature Male? Just wondering for future reference. Duly noted on the bone dry substrate I'll make modifications to the other tank. Thanks man!
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,315
And try to get seperate enclosures....divided enclosures are a disaster waiting to happen with ts.
 

jezzy607

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
579
This "they NEED dry substrate" business cracks me up. I've been keeping them for 20 years and have provided moist substrate and plenty of ventilation (I do let it dry between waterings) without any issues. They do have wet and dry seasons in the wild. They are certainly hardy and tolerant of dry conditions though. There is video footage (I forget from who) on youtube of some guys (maybe Guy himself?) finding "OBT" in the wild on a roadside embankment in which you can see moist soil and lush foliage (probably during or right after a rainy season). So take that for consideration.

That looks like an adult male that died of old age, which can easily happen in less than two years with this species. They can also mature quite small. I'm sure moisture had nothing to do with it.
 

Ghost56

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
441
This "they NEED dry substrate" business cracks me up. I've been keeping them for 20 years and have provided moist substrate and plenty of ventilation (I do let it dry between waterings) without any issues. They do have wet and dry seasons in the wild. They are certainly hardy and tolerant of dry conditions though. There is video footage (I forget from who) on youtube of some guys (maybe Guy himself?) finding "OBT" in the wild on a roadside embankment in which you can see moist soil and lush foliage (probably during or right after a rainy season). So take that for consideration.

That looks like an adult male that died of old age, which can easily happen in less than two years with this species. They can also mature quite small. I'm sure moisture had nothing to do with it.
I didn't mean that moisture had anything to do with it, just noticed they mentioned they moisten the sub. In my experience, sure they can survive just fine with some moisture occasionally, but they thrive on dry sub. Anytime something as simple as the water bowl wicking into the substrate has happened, mine has showed noticeable signs of stress that goes away once things dry back out. Again, that's my experience though.

Oh man. That makes me feel a little better I guess. How are you so positive he was a mature Male? Just wondering for future reference. Duly noted on the bone dry substrate I'll make modifications to the other tank. Thanks man!
If you compare the end of the pedipalps in that pic between him and one that isn't a mature male, you'll notice it almost looks like part of the pedipalp is "missing" on the male. You'll also see emboli on the bottom side of the pedipalps on the male. And no problem!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
This "they NEED dry substrate" business cracks me up. I've been keeping them for 20 years and have provided moist substrate and plenty of ventilation (I do let it dry between waterings) without any issues. They do have wet and dry seasons in the wild. They are certainly hardy and tolerant of dry conditions though. There is video footage (I forget from who) on youtube of some guys (maybe Guy himself?) finding "OBT" in the wild on a roadside embankment in which you can see moist soil and lush foliage (probably during or right after a rainy season). So take that for consideration.

That looks like an adult male that died of old age, which can easily happen in less than two years with this species. They can also mature quite small. I'm sure moisture had nothing to do with it.
I've always provided my Ts with a moist environment to provide the humidity that they require to molt. I'm so afraid that if I didnt they would get stuck. I've looked up the wet and dry seasons for all if my Ts and they vary so widely that I've found a happy middle ground that everyone can be happy with. Just like you I allow the substrate to dry out before I mist them again. I had a bad run in with some mold when i kept the enclosure to wet. Its all about learning. My T was rehoused and all is well with her now. But i do appreciate all of the comments that have been made, everyone has been most helpful.
That makes me sad to hear he was an adult, but it makes me feel like I didnt kill him so I guess it's not all bad. Poor guy...I didnt even breed him. Feel like he missed out on continuing his legacy there.
 

jezzy607

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
579
P. murinus, as well as most other species, can molt perfectly well when substrate is dry as long as the spider itself is well hydrated. So don't be overly concerned about molting complications if the sub is on the dry side. Definitely never add moisture or disturb a T when it is in the process of molting.
 

Jewels

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2020
Messages
1
P. murinus, as well as most other species, can molt perfectly well when substrate is dry as long as the spider itself is well hydrated. So don't be overly concerned about molting complications if the sub is on the dry side. Definitely never add moisture or disturb a T when it is in the process of molting.
Good to know about the dry sub. Honestly, I'm not brave enough to mess with them anyway other than husbandry or meal time lol I'm not ending up on that did it bite you poll haha I've only seen my rose hair molt, and it freaked me out. I was new to the hobby and when a spider turns upside down they are dead or so I thought. I woke my husband up at 2am panicked lol ahhh the good times being a noob
 

jezzy607

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
579
Good to know about the dry sub. Honestly, I'm not brave enough to mess with them anyway other than husbandry or meal time lol I'm not ending up on that did it bite you poll haha I've only seen my rose hair molt, and it freaked me out. I was new to the hobby and when a spider turns upside down they are dead or so I thought. I woke my husband up at 2am panicked lol ahhh the good times being a noob

Haha! The first time I ever had a T molt in my care, I saw the exuvia and thought my T died! Then for a moment I was extremely confused to see a set of larger than before legs protruding from his burrow! That was before internet forums and FB, but being a lifelong bug nerd, I figured out what occurred rather quickly.
 
Top