Why are none of my Ts aggressive

Colorado Ts

Arachnoangel
Active Member
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Oct 16, 2019
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785
Are we being trolled here? What's going on?

Questions being asked...no information forth coming from the OP.

How many of us love wasting our time?
 
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DomGom TheFather

Arachnoknight
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Apr 26, 2020
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184
Lmao.
I was quoting to reiterate the point that all specimens are individuals of a species.
I don't know how this happened but it is so perfect.
Can we just live in this moment forever?
I wanted to know from the op how long they had had them and at what point in their development they are.

I think I steered the ship into an iceberg when I also referenced the gbb.
 
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jlr2016

Arachnopeon
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Jun 24, 2020
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11
First things first...what you are calling feisty and aggressive is commonly known as “Feeding Response “. There are many different species each with own “general traits” concerning feeding response.

What species of Tarantula do you have?
Lasiodora parybahana
 

Colorado Ts

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
785
Lasiodora parybahana
I'm raising two L.parahybana slings. Both started as 1/2” sling, one is currently 3”+ and was recently rehoused into an intermediate enclosure. The 2nd sling is currently ~1.5” and is housed in a 4X4X4 AMAC box.

Both slings spend a lot of time in their burrows. Neither of them has shown the very strong feeding response that L.parahybanas are known to possess. So I'm guess that the strong feeding response doesn't kick in until the spider starts spending more time outside the burrow.

The 3”+ L.parahybana sling is beginning to show a stronger response in that it is no longer afraid of taking down larger prey items, but it doesn’t have the feeding response of even my tiniest Acanthoscurria geniculata slings.
 

Liquifin

Arachnoprince
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May 30, 2017
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Lasiodora parybahana
They're great eaters but the response on how they catch, bounce, or kill prey is entirely random. If they're hungry, they'll go for the prey, so don't expect this amazing feeding response when feeding. Some days the feeding responses are greater or more entertaining than other days. But I wouldn't expect an amazing feeding response every time I feed a T. whether a it is a species that is a great eater or not. So your answer: just let it eat if it's hungry. :)
 

DomGom TheFather

Arachnoknight
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Apr 26, 2020
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184
Ok.
That's enough.
We have some very self important people on here and it would be rude of us to waste their time.
It isn't like they're scrolling through threads on an online forum just itching to spew their knowledge and make themselves feel like they matter.
 

Marc Spider

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
457
I have a range. I have a GBB that is supposed to be a heavy webber and aggressive eater. He is neither of those things. My A. genic, supposedly a murder machine, really doesn't jump on pray. He more meanders over to the general area and waits for the pray to get close.

So even when you have species with a strong feeding response, each T is different and don't always fit the mold.
Really?? You got a broken A geniculata then. Mine are nuts, even as 1/4 inch slings tackle crickets nearing an inch.
 
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