whoa ,more guts than i

Blackbeard

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
17
No way I'm tempting fate like that.
Then again, I don't handle any of my T's but my irminia or cambridgei would be last choice if I were to handle any of them.
Lovely T's.

Incidentally my adult female irminia emerged freshly molted from her webbing after 5 months of hiding and to my unpleasent surprise one of her legs from the third leg pair was missing.
It's sealed up nicely and doesn't bother her so it should be fine.
Still a shame because she is the crown jewel of my collection but I should be glad she made it out ok. :)
That vibrant orange on jet black. :drool:
 
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Tindalos

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
158
handling defensive T's is way overrated

I have handled many defensive T's before, its not that hard to do, if you can work pass a threat display most cases you'll be fine BUT!

DON"T

why learning to handle defensive T's is a very important skill to learn for those "interesting situations"( injured T, escapee, etc.) just don't if not needed

most of these defensive T's are also more sensitive than the hand able ones.

This really stresses out the T.
really bad

for example ive had to a handle a very defensive H.lividum few times, and every time once she returns to her enclosure she huddles up in corner for a few days, and rebuilds another hole although she has a perfectly fine one in the first place. I wont handle her any more as i don't want to cause stress.


in a nutshell what i am saying its not hard handling a defensive a T, its just really stressful for that T.
 

JimM

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Messages
873
An escapee is dealt with easily enough with a deli cup.
 

Anastasia

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 8, 2007
Messages
1,848
Haha, are you insane? biting dude with hairdo like that? might rub of, lol
seriously did he tried bite her @:15?
Crazy kids, lol
 

briarpatch10

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 21, 2010
Messages
67
The hair-do is a little known side effect of the venom from the p. Camridgei. It causes stick straight points to shoot out of your head.
 

ZergFront

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 2, 2009
Messages
1,959
Nice but I'd rather handle my irminia's (excluding Pita. She's wack-a-doo! Did manage to get on me during a transfer though with no threat pose) My cambridgei male, Fang is very defensive. Doesn't even like water being poured into his water cap.

Careful not to exhale near one. {D
 

micheldied

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,328
No way I'm tempting fate like that.
Then again, I don't handle any of my T's but my irminia or cambridgei would be last choice if I were to handle any of them.
Lovely T's.

Incidentally my adult female irminia emerged freshly molted from her webbing after 5 months of hiding and to my unpleasent surprise one of her legs from the third leg pair was missing.
It's sealed up nicely and doesn't bother her so it should be fine.
Still a shame because she is the crown jewel of my collection but I should be glad she made it out ok. :)
That vibrant orange on jet black. :drool:
The thing about my girl in particular, is that she is one of my most docile Ts.
Never thrown up a threat display, and quite fine with handling.
She's more docile and less skittish than my G. rosea.
She was the same with her past owner.
 

Teal

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 11, 2009
Messages
4,112
I would handle my male, Lamb.. he got his name from being so docile, even now as he's growing up. Aurora, my female, on the other hand... I wouldn't give her the chance to nail you, because she'd love it! lol

But it's true... once you get a defensive T out of their enclosure, most calm down pretty quickly.
 
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